London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2005


Eastern Daily Press
Educational opportunity is declining in modern Britain

Peter Lampl, a successful businessman, has returned to Britain and established the Sutton Trust, which provides educational help to children from less privileged backgrounds. Research from the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the LSE, commissioned by the trust found that social mobility in the UK is lower than in other Western countries and is falling. This is because access to good education is based on wealth, in contrast to the grammar school system where it was based on brains.

This article appeared in the Eastern Daily Press on December 20, 2005
No link to article available.

Related Publications

Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

Scotland on Sunday
Class divide: now it's even harder for poor to get on

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, that compared children born in the 1950s and the 1970s and found that greater educational opportunities disproportionately benefited those from better-off backgrounds.

This article appeared in Scotland on Sunday on 11 December, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications

Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

Daily Telegraph
The poor are being robbed in Labour's class war

A recent LSE study showed that the UK was the most socially immobile of eight similar advanced western countries, the others being Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark, Finland and the U.S. The main reason cited was disparity in educational opportunity, and the increasing link between family income and educational achievement.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on December 8, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. CEE Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002

The Guardian
Physical attraction of science runs low

Dr Sandra McNally of the Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, comments on the current trend in UK schools where pupils are becoming less attracted to science-related subjects.

This article appeared in The Guardian, 28 November, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas, written with Stephen Machin, Costas Meghir et al. Report and Summary.


Entorno
Un laboratorio contra el fracaso escolar

A group of international experts offer opinions as to what policies may help towards solving problems of education in Spain. Steve Machin of CEP speaking about the UK Literacy and Numeracy schemes.

This article appeared in the Entorno on November 19, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Large benefits, low costs by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 9/1, Spring 2004.

The Literacy Hour by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally CEE Discussion Paper No.43 published December 2004


The Financial Times
EU set for clash on 'Anglo-Saxon' versus 'social' welfare models

Before the summit of the European Union at Hampton Court, the journalist Nicholas Timmins poses the question 'Does much of mainland Europe need to break up its "social model" welfare state in favour of an "Anglo-Saxon" model along UK and US lines? Richard Layard replies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 21 October, 2005
Link to article


French Institute
Gross National Happiness (Training one's mind and monitoring society's happiness)

18 October at 6.30 pm

Richard Layard, economist, professor at the London School of Economics, member of the House of Lords and author (Happiness - Lessons from a New Science, Penguin, 2005) and Matthieu Ricard, former molecular biologist, Buddhist monk, interpreter for H.H. the Dalai-Lama, photographer and author (Le plaidoyer pour le bonheur, Nil editions, 2003, Happiness, a guide to developing life’s most important skill, Little Brown, New-York, forthcoming May 2006) will debate on how to train our minds in order to develop in ourselves conditions that generate happiness and how we could monitor the development of happiness in our countries as closely as we monitor the development of income. The basic aim should be the sense of an overall purpose wider than oneself.

Matthieu Ricard and Richard Layard will sign their books after the conference.

Price: £20/£10 (students): advance booking: 020 7073 1350 With the generous support of the French Institute.

The French Institute
17 Queensberry Place
London SW7 2JR
Location: Cinema


See also http://www.institut-francais.org.uk

All the profits will be devoted entirely to humanitarian projects in Nepal and in Tibet.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
Professor Layard is Director of the Wellbeing Programme at CEP

The Times Educational Supplement
Foster to Question Quality of Managers

Professor Richard Layard was a speaker at the TES Learning and Skills Symposium that was held on Wednesday 12 October 2005. He spoke on the future and importance of Apprenticeships as part of a government inquiry into further education.

This article appeared in The Times Educational Supplement on 14 October, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
A full report following the TES Symposium has been published and is available to download. See Vision 2010 Symposium

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage

CEP Skills for All research programme.

The Observer
It's good to see that the old class structure is alive and flourishing

Reference to LSE research that shows that a working-class child was far more likely to get on if he was born in the 1950s rather than the 1970s. Nick Cohen comments (following on from Hands off the NHS).

This article appeared in the Observer on 2 October, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002, Paper No' CEEDP0026
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

The Sunday Times
Technology kicks away the career ladder

Today's aspiring CEOs are finding it much harder to work their way up from the bottom than the generation before - poor children born in the 1970s were 30% less likely to improve their position in society than those born in the 1950s, according to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Greggand Steve Machin.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times Online on October 3, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002, Paper No' CEEDP0026
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

The Daily Telegraph
Classic comedy sketch on lack of social mobility has the last laugh

Reference to research by Centre for Economic Performance, LSE into social mobility.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 30 September, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Social mobility in Britain: low and falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Spring 2005
Intergenerational mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Report produced for the Sutton Trust.
Changes in intergenerational mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. CEE Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

The Chronicle of Higher Education
The Legacy of '68

Reference to research by Eric Maurin, of Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques and Sandra McNally, LSE, that shows France's short-lived 'revolution' of May 1968. very positive effects for affected students and is of contemporary relevance given the current debate about widening access to higher education.

This article appeared in the Chronicle of Higher Education September 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Vive la Révolution! Long term returns of 1968 to the angry students , Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper 49, June 2005

Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, 'Children of the revolution', CentrePiece, Summer 2005

The Guardian
'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

The Guardian
'Mental illness is now our biggest social problem'

Richard Layard argues that while unemployment was a national disgrace, and still has not gone fully away, mental illness is now our biggest social problem - bigger than unemployment and bigger than poverty.

"We need our politicians to see it that way, because that is how it seems to one third of all the families in the country."

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Related Links
The Wellbeing research programme website.

The Guardian
Full text: David Davis at the IPPR

The Tory leadership hopeful stakes his claim to being a 'compassionate conservative' including his concern over social mobility in Britain

With reference to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 14, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517


The Daily Telegraph
Patients suffering depression 'need therapy more than pills'

Lord Layard, professor at LSE, who wrote the Downing Street strategy paper, Mental Health: Britain's Biggest Social Problem?, said there was a "mass of suffering" with half of all those with clinical depression receiving no help.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on September 12, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications:

The Sun September 13, 2005
Britain's got the blues
Britain is suffering a national epidemic of depression, a Downing Street adviser said yesterday. Lord Richard Layard, LSE, claimed 10,000 extra therapists are needed to combat the problem.
Link to article

Guardian September 12, 2005
Call for action on depression epidemic
Plans for a national network of 250 psychological treatment centres to provide talking therapy for 1 million people a year are being considered by ministers to tackle a national epidemic of depression and anxiety. A framework for making behavioural therapy freely available under the NHS will be set out today by Lord Richard Layard, LSE and Downing Street adviser.
Link to article

India Monitor September 12, 2005
Call for action on depression epidemic
A framework for making behavioural therapy freely available under the NHS will be set out today by Lord Richard Layard, LSE and a Downing Street adviser who has convinced the prime minister that mental illness has become Britain's biggest social problem.
Link to article

Related links
For further information on Happiness see the Wellbeing research programme.

'Happiness: Lessons from a New Science' is published by Allen Lane.

Liverpool Daily Post
Should poorer pupils be sent to private schools?

According to research by LSE, sponsored by the Sutton Trust, of eight advanced countries Britain's social mobility is the lowest and mobility in Britain has actually declined in recent decades, in part because advances in education have disproportionately benefited the affluent.

This article appeared in the Liverpool Daily Post on August 30, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, CEP Discussion Paper No' 517


The Observer
Sits vac: Teacher, carer, thatcher,Jeeves ...

Barbara Oaff looks at the best UK careers for a new start. The Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, verifies earlier studies that point to a lack of economists, statisticians and mathematicians. After gaining a suitable degree, graduates can go on to work in any number of sectors, from pharmaceuticals to farming to fashion. Starting salaries go from £15,000 to £28,000.

This article appeared in The Observer on August 28, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
''What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK'' edited by Steve Machin and Anna Vignoles

Related Links
CEP's Education and Skills programme

The Sunday Telegraph
Access All Areas

The growing performance gap between state and private schools is creating an educational apartheid, says Sir Peter Lampl. The best independent schools must be opened up to all children likely to benefit. Reference to research by LSE, which we also funded, social mobility in Britain has actually declined in recent decades, and of eight advanced countries Britain's mobility is the lowest.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph, on August 21, 2005
No Link

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


BBC
From Our Own Correspondent: Stark reality of the American dream

Humphrey Hawksley writes:

'I had come to Seattle because of a recent survey by the Centre for Economic Performance in London, on how easy or difficult it was to get rich in different parts of the world - or if not rich, at least move out of poverty.

'"If you are born into poverty in the US," said one of its authors [Jo Blanden], "you are actually more likely to remain in poverty than in other countries in Europe, the Nordic countries, even Canada, which you would think would not be that different." '

This article appeared on the BBC, From Our Own Correspondent, on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


BBC News Online
We need a dramatic solution

The National Union of Students has warned the government to improve the education system so more people stay on after the age of 16. Reference to research from LSE, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, have found that British children from disadvantaged backgrounds have less chance of moving up the social ladder today than they did 20 years ago.

This article appeared on BBC News Online on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


The Herald
Why streaming in schools helps pupils achieve more

But what exactly has the comprehensive system achieved? Earlier this year a study into social mobility carried out by the London School of Economics discovered that children born in 1970 were less likely to break free of their family background and fulfil their potential than children born in 1958.

The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which commissioned the LSE research, believes this decline in social mobility is partly due to the phasing out of grammar schools.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin

This article appeared in the The Herald Online on August 18, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


FENews.co.uk
Employers recognise skills gap

At the Industry and Government Summit on Skills Shortage, Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at LSE, delivers key-note speech on UK attitudes regarding learning and training. Dr Steedman called for an analysis of European competitor's methodology and investment initiatives to determine if what can be learnt from these educational models.

This article appeared on FENews.co.uk on August 11, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow of the Education and Skills Programme at CEP and headed the Skills for All Programme

The Times
Schools for a scandal

Among the most infuriating conundrums in Britain is why comprehensive schools still exist when every argument for them has been undermined.

Sutton Trust study for the London School of Economics, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,proves that comprehensives damage social mobility.

This article appeared in The Times on August 09, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


The Sunday Times
A short walk beats the school run

Reference to a study by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin that has estimated that in Britain, a home near the best school in a catchment area can be worth almost 20 per cent more than a similar property adjacent to what is perceived as the 'worst' school.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on August 07, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Paying for primary schools: supply constraints, school popularity or congestion? Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin, December 2004, Paper No' CEEDP0042

The Sunday Times
Education: Grammars: the regeneration

Are grammar schools set for a Doctor Who-like rebirth? Quite possibly if unions are voting for them, say Deirdre Fernand and Jasper Gerard. Reference to LSE research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin published last month showed that the decline of grammar schools had helped deepen class divisions, effectively kicking the ladder away from bright children. The LSE study found a link between income and educational achievement.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times Online on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America


The Observer
Long live grammars

The unacceptable face of British elitism lies in a school system where money matters more than talent. Reference to research by Jo Blanden and colleagues at LSE on Britain becoming 'an aristocracy of wealth'. The LSE found that on average a boy born to a well-to-do family in 1958 earned 17.5 per cent more than a boy born to a family on half the income.

This article appeared in the The Observer on July 31, 2005
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, CentrePiece, Spring 2005

Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage

The Times Online
Education gap between rich and poor children has grown

Despite millions of pounds of investment in primary schools, there is still an achievement gap between children from rich and poor families. A study published by the LSE showed that children born in 1970 were less likely to break free of their background and fulfil their potential than children born in 1958.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Times Online
on July 25, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

International Herald Tribune
2 Cents worth: Never too rich or too happy

This article reports research into the state of happiness. Richard Layard, professor of economics at the LSE, said in a 2003 lecture at the school that GDP is an inaccurate measure of happiness.

This article appeared in The International Herald Tribune
on July 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Times Online
Would-be homebuyers come out of the woodwork

Parents paying more to live near a popular school might be better off opting for private education. Recent research by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin of LSE suggests that schools so popular as to being oversubscribed have an effect on the house prices in the surrounding area, even if their league table performance is not brilliant.

This article appeared in the Times Online on July 22, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for primary schools: supply constraints, school popularity or congestion? Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin,  December 2004, Paper No' CEEDP0042

The Guardian
Sharp end of the LSE

Another exchange overheard at the Skills Summit. David Blunkett...is introduced to Dr Hilary Steedman, of the London School of Economics, just before they both go on stage to speak."Are you the responsible end of the LSE?" he asks impertinently. "You'd better wait and see what I have to say," comes the reply.

This article appeared in The Guardian on July 19, 2005.
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow of the Education and Skills Programme at CEP

The Times
The 60-second business book

Succint, "Pass Notes" style look at Richard Layard's book Happiness - Lessons from a new science

This article appeared in The Times
on June 23, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links:
The Happiness research programme website.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Daily Mail
Mugging the middle classes

Reference to research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin that reveals that the ending of educational selection has actually reduced opportunities for the poor and widened the class gulf. The LSE report shows conclusively that the 11-plus was an "escape route" and removing it has undermined social mobility.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail
on June 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications:
'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling'in CentrePiece Spring 2005

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

CentrePiece
Poor children ''now less likely to fulfil their potential''

Social mobility in Britain has fallen over recent decades to levels well below those of Canada, Germany and the Nordic countries, according to research published today by LSE. "Children born to poor families are now less likely to break free of their background and fulfil their potential than they were in the past," according to Jo Blanden, LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

The economists concluded that the strong relationship between family income and educational attainment was a key to understanding Britain's low levels of social mobility.

Countries with high levels of inequality tend to have higher rates of inflation, according to research by Chris Crowe published by the CEP today.

Related Publications:
'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling'in CentrePiece Spring 2005

'More inequality means higher inflation 'in CentrePiece Spring 2005



International Herald Tribune
Vote taken in stride outside Continent

Professor Richard Layard, economist from LSE, has recently published a book in which he examines the effects of government tax, employment and other policies on the personal happiness of ordinary people.

No link

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

academics.de
Konsequenzen fur Unternehmen aus der Einfuhrung des Bachelors

Die Einführung des sechssemestrigen Bachelors als Regelabschluß könnte erhebliche Umwälzungen im deutschen Ausbildungs- und Wirtschaftssystem zur Folge haben. Diese Schlußfolgerung legt jedenfalls eine deutsch-britische Studie nahe.

This article appeared in the academics.de on June 01, 2005
Link to article.

The Financial Times
Well-paid career is no longer simply a matter of course

Research by Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles, LSE, concludes that increased education supply has not resulted in falling wage differentials between more- and less-educated people.

With reference to the book "What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK" , edited by Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles, published by Princeton University Press. The book launch on Wednesday 8th June 2005.

This article appeared in The Financial Times May 31, 2005.
Link to article

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education

The Times Educational Supplement
Esteem will drive the merits of vocation

Despite the disappointment of the educational world with the previous Government's response to Tomlinson, in the vocational field there is an important job to do.

Hilary Steedman and John West on how esteem for vocational courses has to be earned, not just conferred.

This article appeared on The Times Educational Supplement May 27, 2005.
Link to article.

The Press Association
Public school is still key for legal high-fliers

The legal profession is still dominated by people who went to public school, according to a report published today. Education charity the Sutton Trust said the situation had not significantly improved in the last 15 years. Research by LSE published last month showed that social mobility has declined in Britain over the last 30 years and Britain, together with the US, has the lowest mobility of the eight industrial countries surveyed.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Press Association
on May 24, 2005.
No Link

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

The Scotsman
Labour has unleashed the dogs of class war

Recent research from LSE demonstrates that the annihilation of the grammar schools severely reduced the opportunities for the poorest in society to work their way up. As a result, Britain now has lower social mobility than comparable western countries.

With reference to work by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This article appeared in The Scotsman
on May 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

The Sunday Times
Relax, there is no need to be gloomy about jobs

According to a research by the Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development, the labour market might be starting to slow down after over a decade of prosperity. A rise in unemployment would have devastating consequences, especially after such a long phase of sustained growth, as pointed out by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman in their latest book 'Unemployment' (Oxford University Press).

This article appeared in The Sunday Times
on May 22, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Links
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell, and Richard Jackman.

BBC News Online
Challenge of 'Hidden Unemployed'

Inactivity is one of the biggest problems the Welsh economy faces, yet it has not become a major issue in this general election campaign.

Giulia Faggio of the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE comments.

This article appeared in BBC News Online
on May 03, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Giulia Faggio and Stephen Nickell, Inactivity Among Prime Age Men in the UK, CEP Discussion Paper No' 673, February 2005.

The Western Mail
Education, education, education - what rubbish!

"According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
Link to letter.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

The Western Mail
Education, education, education - what rubbish!

"According to research by the London School of Economics, Britain and the United States have the worst social inequality in a sample of eight rich nations."

Letter published in The Western Mail, with reference to Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

This Letter appeared in The Western Mail May 02, 2005.
Link to letter.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America

BBC News Online
Is increased choice any good?

The issue of choice is now at the centre of the political debate, with Labour and Conservatives both proclaiming their commitment to increasing choice in health and education.

Professor Steve Machin of the London School of Economics warns that there is relatively little evidence that competition improves performance in state education.

This article appeared in BBC News Online May 02, 2005.
Link to article.

CNN
Giant aspires to superpower status

While the United States still sets the pace for global markets, there is a growing awareness that, as China's economy expands rapidly, the balance of power is shifting in its direction.

Dr Linda Yueh of the London School of Economics (LSE), says the rising influence of the Chinese economy is causing a fundamental rethink of the implications for the world, and for China's neighbours.

This article appeared on CNN April 29, 2005.
Link to article

Related Links
CNN Eye on China

Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung
''Bachelor senkt Qualifikationsniveau''; Vergleichende Studie über verkürzten Hochschulabschluß in Großbritannien und Deutschland

Ein Vergleich mit Großbritannien zeigt, daß die Einführung des Bachelorabschlusses das Qualifikationsniveau der Hochschulabsolventen verringert. Gemeinsam mit der "London School of Economics" hat die Fachhochschule für Technik und Wirtschaft in Berlin 90 Unternehmen in Großbritannien und Deutschland befragt. Darunter waren Banken, Handel, Automobilindustrie und Softwareentwicklung. Grundlage der Befragungen war ein strukturierter Fragebogen - für den Vergleich der Hochschulbildung wurden die Informatikstudiengänge gewählt.

With reference to 'The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison' by Jim Foreman, Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner, June 2003

This article appeared in Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung April 25, 2005.
No direct link to article

Related Links
Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung Online Paper

Related Publications
The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, CEP DP 0575

The Boston Business Journal
MIT's Daron Acemoglu wins 2005 Clark medal

Professor Daron Acemoglu of the Department of Economics, MIT has received the prestigious John Bates Clark Medal, awarded every two years to an American economist under the age of 40 for making a significant contribution to economic thought and knowledge.

Professor Acemoglu gained his PhD from The London School of Economics and was associate member of the CEP.

This article appeared in The Boston Business Journal April 25, 2005.
Link to article.

LoWER Publications
Low-Wage Employment in Europe: Perspectives for Improvement - edited by I. Marx and W. Salverda

Employment in Europe is rising, but not fast enough. Yet, it would appear that there remains an enormous potential for job growth. Europe is known to have a massive employment deficit relative to the United States. It is often said that this is because economic activiy in the United states is more geared towards labourintensive services than in Europe. Americans are thought to buy far more financial and personal care services, as well as more domestic support and gardening. but is this perception entirely correct? How far is the greater service orientation of the US economy really a source of its higher employment rate? And would such service jobs be desirable jobs? Many service workers in the United States are said to be "working poor". The concern in much of Europe is that the opening up of low-paid service jobs could undermine Europe's social model, as well as do little to enhance social inclusion and gender equality.

Includes "Measuring Labour Market Performance on Jobs and Pay at the Individual and Household Level" by Paul Gregg and Jonathan Wadsworth.

Related links
AIAS Publications

Sutton Trust News Release
Social Mobility In Britain Lower Than Other Advanced Countries and Declining

In a study sponsored by the Sutton Trust, researchers from Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics have compared the life chances of British children with those in other advanced countries, and the results are disturbing.

They have found that social mobility in Britain - the way in which someone's adult outcomes are related to their circumstances as a child - is lower than in Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. And while the gap in opportunities between the rich and poor is similar in Britain and the US, in the US it is at least static, while in Britain it is getting wider.

See the full news release
on April 25, 2005.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Related articles appeared in:

The Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Demise of grammar schools leaves poor facing uphill battle

The Daily Telegraph
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Poorest pay for failures of state schools

The Guardian
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: UK low in social mobility league, says charity

The Independent
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Britain the land of least opportunity

The Daily Mail
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: End of grammar schools has helped widen class divisions

The Sun
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Rich/poor gap gets wider

The Financial Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article:University expansion fails to help the poor, says study

Belfast Telegraph
on April 25,2005.
Education class gap 'is growing'
No Link

Lidove noviny
on April 25,2005
Land of opportunity
No Link Coverage on TV & Radio: Channel 4 News
on April 24, 2005.
Link to special report: Life Changes

The Today Programme, BBC Radio 4
on April 25, 2005.
Link to The Today Programme Website


Sutton Trust News Release
Social Mobility In Britain Lower Than Other Advanced Countries and Declining

In a study sponsored by the Sutton Trust, researchers from Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics have compared the life chances of British children with those in other advanced countries, and the results are disturbing.

They have found that social mobility in Britain - the way in which someone's adult outcomes are related to their circumstances as a child - is lower than in Canada, Germany, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Finland. And while the gap in opportunities between the rich and poor is similar in Britain and the US, in the US it is at least static, while in Britain it is getting wider.

See the full news release
on April 25, 2005.

Read the Report: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America, by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Related articles appeared in:

The Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Demise of grammar schools leaves poor facing uphill battle

The Daily Telegraph
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Poorest pay for failures of state schools

The Guardian
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: UK low in social mobility league, says charity

The Independent
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Britain the land of least opportunity

The Daily Mail
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: End of grammar schools has helped widen class divisions

The Sun
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article: Rich/poor gap gets wider

The Financial Times
on April 25, 2005.
Link to article:University expansion fails to help the poor, says study

Belfast Telegraph
on April 25,2005.
Education class gap 'is growing'
No Link

Lidove noviny
on April 25,2005
Land of opportunity
No Link Coverage on TV & Radio: Channel 4 News
on April 24, 2005.
Link to special report: Life Changes

The Today Programme, BBC Radio 4
on April 25, 2005.
Link to The Today Programme Website


The New Statesman
Britain's rich kids do better than ever

Reference to research by Jo Blanden, LSE, Stephen Machin of University College London and Paul Gregg of Bristol University. They compared children to their parents generation.

This article appeared in New Statesman March 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002

The Independent
Education investment fails poorest pupils

A new report by the London School of Economics shows that the government has failed to stop young people from Britain's most deprived boroughs from leaving school with no GCSE passes. The report - "Tackling the Poverty of Opportunity: Developing 'RBS Enterprise Works' for The Prince's Trust" - by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Shankar Rajagopalan says millions of pounds worth of government money has failed to stop a new generation of teenagers from the poorest homes leaving school with nothing to show for 11 years of compulsory schooling.

This article appeared in The Independent March 21, 2005.
Link to article.

Also in New Zealand Online.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Download the report from The Prince's Trust website.

The Observer
Middle classes fill best state school

According to Sir Peter Lampl, a key government adviser on working-class access to independent and leading state schools, the government is to blame for the failure of a four-year project he devised to get more state school pupils into private schools. He also claims that, according to a study by researchers of the London School of Economics, social mobility has declined significantly over the last 30 years and this trend is set to continue.

This article appeared in The Observer March 20, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002

The Independent
Education Quandary

Are we losing sight of what schools are for? The Government tells them to teach children to be nice to each other. Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, says they should teach children how to be happy. Is this just more mumbo-jumbo?

Reference to the work of Professor Richard Layard, LSE, that despite growing prosperity, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago. He argues that schools have a role in building individual self-advancement at an early age in people.

This article appeared in The Independent - Education section March 17, 2005.
Link to article.

The Independent
Education Quandary

Are we losing sight of what schools are for? The Government tells them to teach children to be nice to each other. Professor Richard Layard, of the LSE, says they should teach children how to be happy. Is this just more mumbo-jumbo?

Reference to the work of Professor Richard Layard, LSE, that despite growing prosperity, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago. He argues that schools have a role in building individual self-advancement at an early age in people.

This article appeared in The Independent - Education section March 17, 2005.
Link to article.

Progress Seminars
Social Mobility - are some still more equal than others?

Wednesday 16 March 2005, 6.00pm
Committee Room 8, The House of Commons

Ruth Kelly is among the high profile speakers who will address the Progress seminar 'social mobility - are some still more equal than others?' Mike Dixon from the IPPR, Professor Stephen Machin from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and Barbara Roche MP, will join her in the debate. Parmjit Dhanda MP, vice chair of Progress, will chair the seminar.

Related Links:
The Progress website.

The Guardian
Students of the revolution thriving in France

Eric Maurin, of Paris-Jourdan Sciences Economiques and Sandra McNally, LSE, investigate the long term effects of 1968 revolutions. Dr McNally and Dr Maurin conclude: "Our study suggests very positive effects of the '1968 events' for affected cohorts and is of contemporary relevance given the current debate in many countries about widening access to higher education."

This article appeared in The Guardian March 09, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Vive la Révolution! Long Term Effects of 1968 to the Angry Students , Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Seminar Paper to be presented on Friday 11 March at the DfES.

For further details see the CEE Seminars page.

The Guardian
Blair''s Green antidote to beating the blues

The Government's Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs is planning to compile a wellbeing index, which includes a number of factors other than income (neighbourhood, mental health, access to green areas etc.) A book recently published by LSE professor Richard Layard argues that we are no happier now than 50 years ago.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 08, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Guardian
Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Guardian
Life, Labour and the pursuit of happiness

Happiness is all the rage. The year kicked off with a big conference in the United States on the subject, then Professor Richard Layard, LSE, published a book on it and now the government is getting into it. Professor Layard thinks happiness should become the biggest goal for the government. He suggests things such as compulsory parenting classes and lessons in emotional intelligence from the age of five onwards.

This article appeared on The Guardian March 07, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Denver Post
'Happy' as public policy

"What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" - Luke 9:25. Or, as Richard Layard puts it in secular, supranational terms in "Happiness: Lessons From a New Science," what good is it if Western societies get richer and richer but their populations become no happier?

Layard, a highly regarded British economist and pioneer in the new field of happiness studies, proves both halves of his equation quite satisfactorily in this engaging if inevitably controversial work. Standards of living in the United States, Britain, Western Europe and Japan have more than doubled in 50 years, bringing us improved health and shorter work weeks and allowing us to accumulate more and more stuff.

This article appeared on The Denver Post March 06, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

The Denver Post
'Happy' as public policy

"What shall it profit a man, if he shall gain the whole world, and lose his own soul?" - Luke 9:25. Or, as Richard Layard puts it in secular, supranational terms in "Happiness: Lessons From a New Science," what good is it if Western societies get richer and richer but their populations become no happier?

Layard, a highly regarded British economist and pioneer in the new field of happiness studies, proves both halves of his equation quite satisfactorily in this engaging if inevitably controversial work. Standards of living in the United States, Britain, Western Europe and Japan have more than doubled in 50 years, bringing us improved health and shorter work weeks and allowing us to accumulate more and more stuff.

This article appeared on The Denver Post March 06, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Richard Layard, Happiness: Lessons from a new Science, Penguin Press, March 2005.

Western Daily Press
Make life smiles better instead of just making miserable money

Review of 'Happiness: Lessons From A New Science', the book by LSE Professor Richard Layard in which he argues that, in spite of higher levels of income, we are no happier than we were 50 years ago.

Daily Telegraph
Family gap years 'no help to children'

Leaving gaps between children to spare more time for each of them does not result in better educational achievement, the largest study of its kind shows today. The study by the Centre for the Economics of Education says that this is the case whether the first-born is a member of a family of two or 10. Comments from Stephen Machin,director of the Centre.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph, March 01, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Sandra E. Black, Paul J. Devereux and Kjell G. Salvanes, The more the merrier? The effect of family composition on children's outcomes, CEE seminar paper presented 25 February 2005.

Radio Free Europe
World: Signs Grow Of Dollar Losing Favor As World''s Reserve Currency

Gianluca Benigno, LSE, states "The euro is an alternative reserve currency that the central banks are considering is becoming more liquid and important"

This article appeared on the Radio Free Europe website, February 24, 2005.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Gianluca Benigno and Pierpaolo Benigno, Designing Target Rules for International Monetary Policy Cooperation, Paper No' CEPDP0666, December 2004.

Times Educational Supplement
Wanted: Boffins with business balls

Why does the commercial world turn a blind eye to the demands of academics? Small firms are often too stretched, but there is also the problem of a common language. Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at LSE, who interviewed 90 firms in Britain and Germany to compare information and communication technology skills, says the ways of publishing research are deficient

This article appeared in The Times Educational Supplement, February 18, 2005.
No direct link.

Related Publications
Hilary Steedman, Karin Wagner and Jim Foreman, The Impact on Firms of ICT Skill-Supply Strategies: An Anglo-German Comparison, Paper No' CEPDP0575, June 2003.

The Guardian
Why the culture of failure has been hard to break

Assessing Labour's promises for education. Reference to research published in July 2004 by the Institute of Education and LSE on educational opportunity expanding.

This article appeared in The Guardian, February 01, 2005.
Link to article

Related news articles
Class gap widens under Blair
The class divide in UK higher education widened during Tony Blair's first term in office as the children of Middle England reaped the benefits of university expansion, new research reveals. Anna Vignoles of the IoE, who conducted the research with Fernando Galindo-Rueda and Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez of the LSE, said: 'The message is that things are getting better, everybody is more likely to go into higher education, but the gap between rich and poor is widening.'

This article appeared in THES July 2, 2004.
Link to article (subscription needed)

This article appeared in The Times July 2, 2004.
Link to article

This article appeared in BBC News Online July 3, 2004.
Link to article

Related publications
Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Anna Vignoles, The Widening Socio-economic Gap in UK Higher Education in the National Institute Economic Review, No' 190, October 2004

Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Anna Vignoles, Class Ridden or Meritocratic? An Economic Analysis of Recent Changes in Britain, Paper No' CEEDP0032, May 2003


The Guardian: Office Hours
The inside track: Welfare benefits

It is a widespread orthodoxy that Europe lags behind the US in job creation because workers in the Eurozone are featherbedded with social welfare benefits. Even German and French trade unions are beginning to accept this belief, introducing longer working weeks to defend jobs. Yet some economists are starting to wonder if the apparently freewheeling US economy might actually be rather less good at job creation than has previously been thought. True, the unemployment rate in the US is half that of Germany's, but fewer jobs are being produced than expected, given the recent economic recovery.

This is according to two prominent US economists, Richard Freeman and William Rodgers, writing in CentrePiece, the magazine for job-market anoraks, produced by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance. Like other economists, Freeman and Rodgers brush aside the US Government's excuse that job growth is weak because productivity is strong. Instead they turn their attention to, among other things, health insurance. In the US, private health insurance is principally an employment perk. This means that not only are the jobless without health cover, but that the most expensive health system in the world is financed almost entirely by employers. The costs of health insurance are a powerful incentive not to take on new workers. They are also a handicap in international competition. The US dollar would have to fall to the value of Monopoly money before US exporters could achieve a level playing field, and nobody is going to allow this to happen. Obviously the US is going to have to rethink its social model. Conversely German and French workers should be slower to concede social benefits and perhaps consider the possibility that the single currency, and its inflexible interest-rate policy, is the cause of sluggish job growth and high unemployment.

This article appeared in The Guardian
on January 17, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Freeman, R and Rodgers, W (2004), 'Jobless recovery: whatever happened to the great American jobs machine?', published in CentrePiece Autumn 2004, in PDF format (272Kb)


The Guardian: Office Hours
The inside track: Welfare benefits

It is a widespread orthodoxy that Europe lags behind the US in job creation because workers in the Eurozone are featherbedded with social welfare benefits. Even German and French trade unions are beginning to accept this belief, introducing longer working weeks to defend jobs. Yet some economists are starting to wonder if the apparently freewheeling US economy might actually be rather less good at job creation than has previously been thought. True, the unemployment rate in the US is half that of Germany's, but fewer jobs are being produced than expected, given the recent economic recovery.

This is according to two prominent US economists, Richard Freeman and William Rodgers, writing in CentrePiece, the magazine for job-market anoraks, produced by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance. Like other economists, Freeman and Rodgers brush aside the US Government's excuse that job growth is weak because productivity is strong. Instead they turn their attention to, among other things, health insurance. In the US, private health insurance is principally an employment perk. This means that not only are the jobless without health cover, but that the most expensive health system in the world is financed almost entirely by employers. The costs of health insurance are a powerful incentive not to take on new workers. They are also a handicap in international competition. The US dollar would have to fall to the value of Monopoly money before US exporters could achieve a level playing field, and nobody is going to allow this to happen. Obviously the US is going to have to rethink its social model. Conversely German and French workers should be slower to concede social benefits and perhaps consider the possibility that the single currency, and its inflexible interest-rate policy, is the cause of sluggish job growth and high unemployment.

This article appeared in The Guardian
on January 17, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Freeman, R and Rodgers, W (2004), 'Jobless recovery: whatever happened to the great American jobs machine?', published in CentrePiece Autumn 2004, in PDF format (272Kb)


The Observer
Class divisions bar students from university

Fifteen years after John Major promised to turn modern Britain into a 'classless society', research commissioned by an educational charity, the Sutton Trust, from experts at LSE reveals the barriers holding back children who start at the bottom. Comments from Paul Gregg, CEP, one of the authors of the report.

This article appeared in The Observer
on January 16, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, Paper No' CEPDP0517, January 2002


The Times
Another revolution in teaching

How do you keep hold of teachers once you've recruited them? With some difficulty, it would seem, as more than 40 per cent of teachers leaving the profession say that nothing could have made them stay, according to a report in CentrePiece (Autumn 2004). Even calculating the level of shortage is not straightforward, the magazine of the Centre for Economic Performance suggests. Demand for teachers has fluctuated considerably over the past 30 years and estimating the need for teachers is further complicated by the fact that teaching is an ageing profession: "Within the next ten years, nearly 50 per cent of the current workforce will have retired," the report authors note.

Current financial administration arrangements for education also make the calculations difficult. Although the Government sets spending limits and determines pay, it does not have control over how many teachers individual education authorities employ.

Despite "golden hellos" of £4,000 for new teachers in shortage subjects, retention in maths, English and modern languages is a problem because career options outside the profession offer better financial rewards. So assessing the flow of newly qualified teachers does not truly indicate the actual level of those available to teach.

The quality of teaching staff is also a concern. Quite aside from debates regarding what kind of qualifications make someone a better teacher, the report suggests that "we need to be concerned about recruiting from the lower end of the ability distribution".

Creating a pay package that would guarantee high-quality teachers remains a problem. The report notes, too, that performance-related pay schemes elsewhere in the world have not been entirely successful and have a limited role in motivating staff.

This article appeared in The Times on January 11, 2005.
Link to article

Related Publications
Arnaud Chevalier and Peter Dolton Teacher shortage: another impending crisis?, CentrePiece, Autumn 2004