London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2006


CNBC Europe
Today's Business

Linda Yueh, Associate of the Globalisation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, appeared on Today’s Business on CNBC Europe to discuss the outlook for the Chinese economy in 2007.

Linda Yueh appeared on CNBC Europe on December 20, 2006
Video link

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast
December 28 2006
CNBC Europe, ‘Worldwide Exchange’

HULIQ.com
Faith primary schools: better schools or better pupils?

An article on the research from the Centre for Economic Performance by Steve Gibbons and Olmo Silva that finds pupil ability and background, rather than teaching standards, account for higher attainment levels at faith primary schools.

This article appeared online on HULIQ.com - Hickory, North Carolina, USA on December 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils? by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Kathimerini
How do companies with bad management survive?

An article in the Greek newspaper Kathimerini related to the management study done in 2004 by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Kathimerini (Greece) on December 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries' by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

National Secular Society
'Faith Schools': official report confirms that their success is down to selection not religion

A report by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, commissioned by the Department of Education and Skills, says that religious affiliation of schools has little impact on their results. Church of England and Roman Catholic schools have fewer children from poor backgrounds and are more likely to be targeted by 'pushy' parents.

This article appeared in the National Secular Society on December 11, 2006.
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils? by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Slate - USA
The not-so-dismal science - how economists measure whether you're happy

In an article on how happiness research is starting to show up in policy proposals, Richard Layard's campaign for more government funding to provide cognitive behavioural therapists is cited.

This article appeared in Slate (a US daily magazine on the web) on December 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Programme webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

Slate - USA
The not-so-dismal science - how economists measure whether you're happy

In an article on how happiness research is starting to show up in policy proposals, Richard Layard's campaign for more government funding to provide cognitive behavioural therapists is cited.

This article appeared in Slate (a US daily magazine on the web) on December 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Programme webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

The Daily Mail
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Daily Mail
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Daily Mail
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Daily Mail
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva of the Centre for Economic Performance shows.

This article appeared in the The Daily Mail on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Evening Standard
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research shows. A Report from Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva from the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE warns that sending a child to a faith primary will give them only a 'very small advantage' over a pupil at the secular school down the road.

This article appeared in The Evening Standard on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Evening Standard
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research shows. A Report from Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva from the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE warns that sending a child to a faith primary will give them only a 'very small advantage' over a pupil at the secular school down the road.

This article appeared in The Evening Standard on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Evening Standard
Faith school education is no better than others

Faith primary schools make little difference to children's future prospects, government-funded research shows. A Report from Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva from the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE warns that sending a child to a faith primary will give them only a 'very small advantage' over a pupil at the secular school down the road.

This article appeared in The Evening Standard on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Telegraph
Faith schools 'get better results because they pick the best pupils'

A study by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva from the Centre for Economic Performance says that better teaching and links to the Church have little to do with results.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on December 8, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbon webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Guardian
School or training plan for all under-18s

Research by Fernando Galindo-Rueda of CEP cited in article on the government's aim to raise the minimumn school-leaving age from 16.

This article appeared in The Guardian on December 6, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'The Long-Term Impacts of Compulsory Schooling: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in School Leaving Dates' by Emilia Del Bono and Fernando Galindo-Rueda, Working Paper of Institute for Social and Economic Research, Paper 2006-44, November 2006, University of Essex: Colchester.

Related Links
Fernando Galindo-Rueda webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Government News Network - GNN
Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance announced

Environment Secretary David Miliband and Trade and Industry Secretary Alistair Darling will jointly chair a Commission on Environmental Markets and Economic Performance. Members of the Commission will be drawn from business, NGO's, academia, trade unions and public sector organisations. Professor John Van Reenen is amongst those who have provisionally agreed to sit on the commission.

This article appeared in the Government News Network on 8 November 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
DTI Environmental Industries Unit webpage
DEFRA website

Online Opinion
A touchstone time for Russia

For the past 100 years Russia has been a country of extreme ideas, and extreme policies based on those ideas. This has resulted in an overall poor economic performance and immense human suffering. As so often in Russian history, what happens now depends very much on one man and on the attitudes of others to him.
This article refers to Richard Layard and a visit he made to Moscow in 1992

This article appeared in Online Opinion on 8 November 2006
Link to article.

Online Opinion
A touchstone time for Russia

For the past 100 years Russia has been a country of extreme ideas, and extreme policies based on those ideas. This has resulted in an overall poor economic performance and immense human suffering. As so often in Russian history, what happens now depends very much on one man and on the attitudes of others to him.
This article refers to Richard Layard and a visit he made to Moscow in 1992

This article appeared in Online Opinion on 8 November 2006
Link to article.

EurekAlert USA
Urban sprawl not cause of human sprawl

Does urban sprawl really cause human sprawl? Not according to research conducted at the University of Toronto, the London School of Economics and Universitat Pompeu Fabra in Spain. In the recently released working paper, Fat City: Questioning The Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Obesity, researchers find no evidence that urban sprawl affects weight.

This article appeared in the EurekAlert, USA on 1 November 2006
Link to article.

Related Publications
Fat City: The Relationship Between Urban Sprawl and Obesity, Jean Eid, Henry G Overman, Diego Puga and Matthew A Turner, November 2006, Paper No' CEEDP0758

Related Links
Henry Overman's webpage

Reuters
Minimum Wage cuts pay inequality

Research published yesterday by Professor David Metcalf of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, showed that the minimum wage, which was introduced in 1999 and has benefited about two million workers, has reduced pay inequality between men and women.

This article appeared in Reuters online on 14 October 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
Daivd Metcalf's webpage

EasyBourse
EU will fail to meet 2010 Innovation, RandD goals - Study

The European Union has no hope of meeting its targets for boosting innovation by 2010, and may never achieve its goals without wide-ranging reform, LSE said Tuesday. In 2000, the EU agreed on a strategy - known as the Lisbon Agenda - for closing the productivity gap with the US by the end of this decade. But according to a report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, ‘progress has been poor.’

This article appeared in EasyBourse on 10 Ocotober 2006
Link to article.

Related Links
CEP Policy Analysis pageThe Lisbon Agenda

THES
Data no help in campaign for better pay

Academics earn more per hour than most other highly qualified workers, but they put in more overtime than most other professionals in the public sector, a report has revealed. The report’s authors are Dr Vignoles, reader in the economics of education at the Institute of Education and lecturer at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE and James Walker.

This article appeared in the THES on 6 October, 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK, Anna Vignoles with James Walker & Mark Collins, Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

THES
Data no help in campaign for better pay

Academics earn more per hour than most other highly qualified workers, but they put in more overtime than most other professionals in the public sector, a report has revealed. The report’s authors are Dr Vignoles, reader in the economics of education at the Institute of Education and lecturer at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE and James Walker.

This article appeared in the THES on 6 October, 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK, Anna Vignoles with James Walker & Mark Collins, Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

THES
Data no help in campaign for better pay

Academics earn more per hour than most other highly qualified workers, but they put in more overtime than most other professionals in the public sector, a report has revealed. The report’s authors are Dr Vignoles, reader in the economics of education at the Institute of Education and lecturer at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE and James Walker.

This article appeared in the THES on 6 October, 2006
Link to article (subscription only).

Related Publications
Higher Education Academic Salaries in the UK, Anna Vignoles with James Walker & Mark Collins, Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper

Related Links
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

Bangkok Post
Who should and shouldn't run the family business?

Family-owned companies run by outsiders appear to be better managed than other companies, a study finds, while family-owned companies run by eldest sons tend to be managed relatively poorly.

This article refers to research conducted by the CEP's Management Interviews and Government Policy team


This article appeared in the Bangkok Post on 25 September 2006
Link to article.

Related Publications
Management Practices Across Firms and Nations, Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Tom Rippin and John Van Reenen December 2004, Download Paper

Related Links
Management Interviews and Government Policy: about the project
CEP Productivity & Innovation Research Programme homepage

Sydney Morning Herald
Going into therapy

Cognitive behaviour therapy has a high success rate among people suffering depression and anxiety. It can make them feel happier. The positive findings have prompted an eminent British economist, and happiness guru, Professor Lord Richard Layard, to argue in favour of training thousands of therapists in the technique.

This article appeared in the Sydney Morning Herald on September 16, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Link

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group programme overview
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

egov monitor
The latest evidence on whether education policy is improving Britain's skills base

Some of the latest research findings on the effectiveness of recent education policies, was presented Tuesday 12 September by Dr Anna Vignoles at the launch of the Manpower Human Resources Lab at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This press release appeared in egovmonitor online on September 14, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Education Policy in the UK, by Dr Anna Vignoles, Deputy Director, Centre for the Economics of Education at CEP and Professor Stephen Machin, Director, CEE.
Manpower Launch Special Report: Human Resources, the Labour Market and Economic Performance: A look back and a look forward by Romesh Vaitilingam.

Related Links
The Manpower Human Resources Lab was launched on Tuesday 12 September 2005 details
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Anna Vignoles’ webpage
Stephen Machin’s webpage
Romesh Vaitilingam's webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Inthenews dot com
Education reforms 'have little success'

The government's continuing efforts to radically shake up Britain's education system reflects the limited success reforms carried out so far have had, it was claimed last night by Anna Vignoles. Dr Vignoles presented the findings of her research into the education system at the launch of a new human resource study centre, arguing that efforts to introduce competition to Britain's education system has not produced any "substantial gains".

This article from Inthenews.co.uk online September 13, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Education Policy in the UK, by Dr Anna Vignoles, Deputy Director, Centre for the Economics of Education at CEP and Professor Stephen Machin, Director, CEE.
Manpower Launch Special Report: Human Resources, the Labour Market and Economic Performance: A look back and a look forward by Romesh Vaitilingam.

Related Links
The Manpower Human Resources Lab was launched on Tuesday 12 September 2005 details
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Anna Vignoles’ webpage
Stephen Machin’s webpage
Romesh Vaitilingam's webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Easy Bourse
Research sees little impact from UK education reforms

Successive education reforms by the U.K. government have failed to lift general skills levels or raise the overall ability level of university graduates, according to a leading academic think tank. Anna Vignoles, from LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said in a paper published on Wednesday that there had also been ‘no substantial gains’ in educational standards from government efforts to introduce more competition between schools.

This article appeared in the Easy Bourse (France) on September 13, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Education Policy in the UK, by Dr Anna Vignoles, Deputy Director, Centre for the Economics of Education at CEP and Professor Stephen Machin, Director, CEE.
Manpower Launch Special Report: Human Resources, the Labour Market and Economic Performance: A look back and a look forward by Romesh Vaitilingam.

Related Links
The Manpower Human Resources Lab was launched on Tuesday 12 September 2005 details
Manpower Human Resources Lab webpage

Anna Vignoles’ webpage
Stephen Machin’s webpage
Romesh Vaitilingam's webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Australian
Share the benefits or beware the backlash to globalisation

In a paper given at the annual economic symposium organised by the Federal Reserve bank of Kansas City at Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Tony Venables noted the entrenched advantages of agglomerations of economic activity - the gains from proximity.

This article appeared in The Australian (Australia) on September 7, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Tony Venables is Director of the Globalisation Research Programme at CEP.

The Guardian
The radar is blinking but who's watching?

The government is still backing Lord [Richard] Layard's recommendations for 10,000 new NHS therapists to tackle depression and anxiety.

This article appeared in the Guardian on August 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report - A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group programme overview

The Daily Mail
British children among Europe's 'unhappiest and unhealthiest'

Research comparing children's wellbeing across 25 countries paints a picture of dysfunctional British families failing to talk to each other or eat together. Government adviser Lord Layard has already announced an inquiry into the wellbeing of British children.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on August 6, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
The Good Childhood Inquiry
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing research programme webpage

The Daily Mail
British children among Europe's 'unhappiest and unhealthiest'

Research comparing children's wellbeing across 25 countries paints a picture of dysfunctional British families failing to talk to each other or eat together. Government adviser Lord Layard has already announced an inquiry into the wellbeing of British children.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on August 6, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
The Good Childhood Inquiry
Richard Layard's webpage
The Wellbeing research programme webpage

Financial Express
Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research

Financial Express
Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research

Financial Express
Happiness indices must be discounted

While Richard Layard of LSE has started the debate around dynamics of happiness and its place in public policy in recent years, Bentham and other utilitarians of the 19th century have indeed laid the foundations.

This article appeared in the Financial Express online on August 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Happiness Research

Bay Windows
Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Bay Windows
Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Bay Windows
Lesbians earn more, according to a British study

Lesbians in the United Kingdom earn 35 percent higher salaries than their straight counterparts, and the nation’s gay men earn one percent less than comparable straight men, the British Broadcasting Corporation reported on Friday. The findings, the results of a four-year government Labour Force Survey, have prompted economists and sociologists around the country to speculate as to what causes the ‘gay pay effect.’ A publication produced by the London School of Economics, which conducted some of the research, said: ‘The average pay differentials conceal much variation across age groups, education, regions and sectors of the economy.’

This article appeared in the Bay Window newspaper, New England, USA on August 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Gay Pay in the UK by Reza Arabsheibani, Alan Marin and Jonathan Wadsworth
CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006

Related Links
Reza Arabsheibani's webpage
Alan Marin's webpage
Jonathan Wadworth's webpage

Ireland online
Trade unionists want government to legislate for flexible working options

Trade unionists have urged employers to carry out audits of their pay-scales to ensure gender equality between male and female staff. Research by LSE shows women in Europe could be earning less than their male counterparts for the next 150 years. In Ireland, men earn an average of €180 a week more than women.

This article appeared in Ireland online on July 29, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Gender Pay Gap by Alan Manning in CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006
'The Part-time Pay Penalty' by Alan Manning and Barbara Petrongolo, CEP Discussion Paper No. 679, March 2005
'The Gender Gap in Early Career Wage Growth' by Alan Manning and Joanna Swaffield, CEP Discussion Paper No. 700, July 2005
The Women and Work Commission (2006), Shaping a Fairer Future

Related Links
Alan Manning's webpage
Labour Markets research programme at CEP

Also in
• News.com, Australia
150-year wait for equal pay: study
• RTE.ie, Ireland
Women to wait 150 years for equal pay - study
• FinFacts, Ireland
Study says fall in UK gender pay gap masks some less positive developments in recent years
• Times of India
Eves have to wait 150 more yrs for equal pay
• Agency France Presse
Women to wait 150 years for equal pay: British study
[No link]
• Evening Standard
‘150 years’ to close gender salary gap
[No link]
• The Gold Coast Bulletin, Australia
Fair pay day is years away
[No link]
• Daily Star
150-year delay for fair pay
[No link]
• Advertiser, Australia
Gender gap; Equal pay for women now '150 years away'
[No link]


Personnel Today
Pay parity for women still 150 years away

The pay gap is set to continue for many decades yet, according to a report by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Personnel Today online on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Gender Pay Gap by Alan Manning in CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006
'The Part-time Pay Penalty' by Alan Manning and Barbara Petrongolo, CEP Discussion Paper No. 679, March 2005
'The Gender Gap in Early Career Wage Growth' by Alan Manning and Joanna Swaffield, CEP Discussion Paper No. 700, July 2005
The Women and Work Commission (2006), Shaping a Fairer Future

Related Links
Alan Manning's webpage
Labour Markets research programme at CEP

Personnel Today
Pay parity for women still 150 years away

The pay gap is set to continue for many decades yet, according to a report by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Personnel Today online on July 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Gender Pay Gap by Alan Manning in CentrePiece Volume 11 Issue 1 Summer 2006
'The Part-time Pay Penalty' by Alan Manning and Barbara Petrongolo, CEP Discussion Paper No. 679, March 2005
'The Gender Gap in Early Career Wage Growth' by Alan Manning and Joanna Swaffield, CEP Discussion Paper No. 700, July 2005
The Women and Work Commission (2006), Shaping a Fairer Future

Related Links
Alan Manning's webpage
Labour Markets research programme at CEP

The Times
If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, says Sholto Byrnes

If I were Richard Layard, I'd be happy to be the happiness czar, comments Sholto Byrnes.

This article appeared in the Times on July 12, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
The Happiness Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Group website

Further media item:
Saturday 8 July
ABC Radio (US)
Richard Layard gave an interview relayed across the US discussing how money cannot buy happiness.
[No link]

The Guardian
The British middle class is operating a closed shop

The power of the old school tie has never been stronger or more damaging to society as a whole. Research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin for the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics shows that while the proportion of children from the bottom 20 per cent gaining degrees has only increased fractionally since the 1970s, at the same time, the proportion from the top 20 per cent achieving degrees has more than doubled.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and
Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage

The Guardian
The British middle class is operating a closed shop

The power of the old school tie has never been stronger or more damaging to society as a whole. Research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin for the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics shows that while the proportion of children from the bottom 20 per cent gaining degrees has only increased fractionally since the 1970s, at the same time, the proportion from the top 20 per cent achieving degrees has more than doubled.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 18, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and
Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage

BBC Three Counties Radio
Productivity at the workplace

Interview on productivity at the workplace given by Tobias Kretschmer.

Aired Thursday, 15th June, Morning Show with Lorna Milton, 4.30-6.30am
[No link available]

Further broadcasts
CNN: Aired Friday, 16th June, Business International, 7.30-8.00pm
Interview given by Tobias Kretschmer on Bill Gates' announcement to step down as Chief Software Architect at Microsoft in 2008.
[No link available]

Further Links
Tobias Kretschmer's webpage
Explaining Productivity and Growth in Europe, America and Asia Research Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

LaVoce
Una gerontocrazia solo presunta

A joint article by Raffaella Sadun and Andrea Prat (Sticerd) in the Italian online economics newspaper talking about the demographic differences between US and Italian top managers.

This article appeared in LaVoce online on June 13, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Raffaella Sadun's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

The Observer
Moving house for your child's education 'may be pointless'

Spending a fortune on a home because it is near a top school may be a waste of money. Your child will do almost as well no matter who their classmates are, a new study has concluded. Steve Gibbons, one of the authors of the report, said: 'Although the attainment of a child's peer-group does matter, the effects are small. His study - from the Centre for the Economics of Education at the London School of Economics - measures the impact a move of school will have on GCSE results.

This article appeared in the Observer on June 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Peer Effects and Pupil Attainment: Evidence from Secondary School Transition by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponje Telhaj, Discussion Paper No. 0063, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE, May 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons' webpage
Shqiponje Telhaj’s webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

The Daily Telegraph
Open independent school doors to all

Mention of research by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin from CEP, that finds social mobility in the UK has declined.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on May 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage

The Guardian
Bedtime stories can help alleviate poverty, says study

According to a study by Jo Blanden of the University of Surrey and Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, children have an increased chance of escaping poverty later in life if their parents read to them.

This article appeared in The Guardian on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme

The Guardian
Bedtime stories can help alleviate poverty, says study

According to a study by Jo Blanden of the University of Surrey and Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, children have an increased chance of escaping poverty later in life if their parents read to them.

This article appeared in The Guardian on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme

Noticias
Labour: early experience vital in tackling poverty

Article from Spain on Jo Blanden’s research finding that children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty.

This article appeared in Noticias (Spain) on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': what enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed in later life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme

The Herald
Read to children to beat poverty

A new report by Jo Blanden of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance for the Department of Work and Pensions finds that parents should not only show an interest in their child’s education but should read to them to increase the chances of their child being successful.

This article appeared in The Herald on May 17, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': What enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme

The Labour Party online
Early experience vital in tackling poverty

Children who are poor but have parents who take an interest in their schooling and read to them when they are young are more likely to pull themselves out of poverty, new research by Jo Blanden published today shows.

This article appeared on the Labour Party Website, May 16, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Bucking the trend': What enables those who are disadvantaged in childhood to succeed later in life? by Jo Blanden, Working Paper No. 31, Department for Work and Pensions (DWP), May 2006.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
DWP Press Release
Education and Skills Research Programme

BBC News
Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

BBC News
Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

BBC News
Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

BBC News
Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

BBC News
Call to tackle therapist shortage

In November 2005, Professor Richard Layard of CEP, recommended 10,000 more therapists should be trained in cognitive behavioural therapy. He also called for a network of 250 dedicated psychological centres to be set up.

This article appeared in BBC News online on May 11, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Case for Psychological Treatment Centres by Richard Layard

Related Links
Richard Layard's webpage
Wellbeing research programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Making the apprenticeship work

How to help the 'forgotten half'. Rigid teaching styles are preventing the 'forgotten half' from attaining necessary skill levels, writes Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow in the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on May 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
Hilary Steedman's webpage
The Education and Skills Programme

The Guardian
Failing to bridge the social gap

Research commissioned by the Sutton trust and published in a Report by the Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, found only 5 per cent of pupils in the country's top 200 schools are from poor homes compared with a national average of 15 per cent.

This article appeared in The Guardian on May 1, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage

United Press International
Canadian study looks at urban sprawl

Researchers from the University of Toronto and London School of Economics are using satellite data and aerial photography to track the evolution of land use in the continental United States. The research is detailed in the May isse of The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

This article appeared in United Press International on April 26, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 121, Issue 2 - May 2006

Related Links
Henry Overman's webpage
The Globalisation Research Programme webpage

United Press International
Canadian study looks at urban sprawl

Researchers from the University of Toronto and London School of Economics are using satellite data and aerial photography to track the evolution of land use in the continental United States. The research is detailed in the May isse of The Quarterly Journal of Economics.

This article appeared in United Press International on April 26, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Volume 121, Issue 2 - May 2006

Related Links
Henry Overman's webpage
The Globalisation Research Programme webpage

BBC News
Young 'face risk of poverty trap'

Research has suggested that poverty in teenage years has had an increasing effect in keeping people poor when they get to middle age. Report by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons of CEP, for the Joseph Rowntree Trust.

This article appeared on BBC News, April 25, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Persistence of Poverty Across Generations by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons

Further press cuttings:
Easier Financial News, 25 April 2006
Poverty twice as likely to persist across generations

Community Newswire, 25 April 2006
New study shows poverty persists across generations

In the news.co.uk, 25 April 2006
Teenage poverty 'sets tone for adulthood'

My Finances.com, 25 April 2006
Born poor, stay poor

24 dash.com, 25 April 2006
Teens caught in poverty trap

Firstrung, UK, 27 April 2006
Poverty twice as likely to persist across generations, shows new CEP/JRF (Joseph Rowntree) research
A conference at CEP and a new JRF publication have demonstrated clearly the strong link between childhood poverty and its continuing persistence across adulthood.


The Guardian
£61,000 premium to be close to a popular school

A move of 10 percentage points up the league tables of schools can boost house prices in the immediate neighbourhood of an improving school by 3%, say academics Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin in the latest Economic Journal.

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Primary Schools: Supply Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion? by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin, The Economic Journal, Volume 116: Issue 510, March 2006.
Paying for Primary Schools: Supply Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion? by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.42, December 2004.

Related Links
Steve Gibbons' webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Education & Skills webpage

The Guardian
£61,000 premium to be close to a popular school

A move of 10 percentage points up the league tables of schools can boost house prices in the immediate neighbourhood of an improving school by 3%, say academics Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin in the latest Economic Journal.

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Primary Schools: Supply Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion? by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin, The Economic Journal, Volume 116: Issue 510, March 2006.
Paying for Primary Schools: Supply Constraints, School Popularity or Congestion? by Steve Gibbons and Steve Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.42, December 2004.

Related Links
Steve Gibbons' webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Education & Skills webpage

The Financial Times
Family-run businesses 'perform poorly'

Research by the Centre for Economic Performance and the McKinsey group has found that objective assessments of managerial performance are important in explaining why UK companies tend to have lower productivity and profitability.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 15, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
CEP Policy Analysis, Inherited Family Firms and Management Practices: the Case for Modernising the UK’s Tax Inheritance by Nick Bloom
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related Links: Nick Bloom’s webpage
John Van Reenen's webpage
CEP’s Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

Letters to the FT in response to CEP research results
Increase family directors' degree of accountability
Letter in response to research by the Centre for Economics Performance at LSE in "Family-run businesses perform poorly".
What matters is how the family business is handed on
Five years of research... (No direct link.)
“Sir, Five years of research by the Centre for Economics Performance at the London School of Economics and McKinsey is an expensive way to say "clogs to clogs in three generations.”

The New Statesman
Where did it all go wrong?

The research report Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin, cited in a discussion about the difference in this government's idea of the role of education from the beliefs that pioneered the comprehensive school education ideal.

This article appeared in the New Statesman on March 6, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

The Sunday Telegraph
It's the individual that counts

The Sutton sponsored CEP Report Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin cited in an analysis of the new "admissions code" that schools will be obliged to follow should the Education Bill get onto the statute book.


This article appeared in the Sunday Telegraph on March 5, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Spring 2005.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Steve Machin's webpage
Alissa Goodman's webpage at the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS)

The Independent
'Red tape as bad, if not worse, in America' claims study

Research by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen discussed in article about the difference in productivity between UK and US firms.

This article appeared in The Independent on February 28, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Link
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

The New Yorker
Pursuing Happiness

Two scholars explore the fragility of contentment. Richard Layard's book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science quoted.

This article appeared in The New Yorker on February 27, 2006 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

Related Links
Happiness Research webpage
Richard Layard's webpage

The New Yorker
Pursuing Happiness

Two scholars explore the fragility of contentment. Richard Layard's book Happiness: Lessons from a new Science quoted.

This article appeared in The New Yorker on February 27, 2006 Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard.

Related Links
Happiness Research webpage
Richard Layard's webpage

The Guardian
Tony Blair's School Report

Research from the CEP offers some answers to the question of how the "education, education, education" Government has done so far.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related Links
Sandra McNally's webpage

The Herald
Aim high in ambition stakes

A report written by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin for the Sutton Trust in 2005 referred to in an article discussing the Scottish Executive's 'Schools of Ambition' project. The project aims to raise standards of education in comprehensive schools sited mainly in disadvantaged areas.

This article appeared in The Herald on February 24, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin

Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005, titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling.

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Paul Gregg's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

The Guardian
Education reforms risk widening social gap

The government's plans to increase "choice" in education risk widening social divisions rather than bringing about improvement in attainment. A report from the Centre for Economic Performance casts doubt on many of Labour's highest profile education policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related media articles [no link available]
School plan 'fails' The Times online 23.02.06
Has Labour's £17bn extra done any good for schools? The Daily Mail 23.02.06
New concession over schools as Blair faces key test of authority The Evening Standard 23.02.06

The Guardian
Education reforms risk widening social gap

The government's plans to increase "choice" in education risk widening social divisions rather than bringing about improvement in attainment. A report from the Centre for Economic Performance casts doubt on many of Labour's highest profile education policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related media articles [no link available]
School plan 'fails' The Times online 23.02.06
Has Labour's £17bn extra done any good for schools? The Daily Mail 23.02.06
New concession over schools as Blair faces key test of authority The Evening Standard 23.02.06

The Guardian
Education reforms risk widening social gap

The government's plans to increase "choice" in education risk widening social divisions rather than bringing about improvement in attainment. A report from the Centre for Economic Performance casts doubt on many of Labour's highest profile education policies.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
'Education, Education, Education': the evidence on school standards, parental choice and staying on by Sandra McNally, CEP Policy Analysis, February 2006.

Excellence in Cities by Sandra McNally and colleagues in CentrePiece Volume 10 Issue 3, Winter 2005/06.

A joint work between CEP and the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS): Excellence in Cities: Evaluation of an Education Policy in Disadvantaged Areas’ by Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Costas Meghir.

Related media articles [no link available]
School plan 'fails' The Times online 23.02.06
Has Labour's £17bn extra done any good for schools? The Daily Mail 23.02.06
New concession over schools as Blair faces key test of authority The Evening Standard 23.02.06

The Times
Are you rude enough to be an entrenpreneur?

What makes someone a good businessperson is not, necessarily, what will make that person an entrenpreneur. The Director of the Centre for Economic Performance, John Van Reenen, makes some interesting observations.

This article appeared in The Times Online on February 20, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage

The Financial Times
Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Sharp rise in cross-border takeovers

John Van Reenen comments with regard to the latest rise in cross-border takeovers.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on February 9, 2006
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen's webpage
Productivity and Innovation Research Programme webpage

The Independent
Joseph Stiglitz: It takes more than free trade to end poverty

Joseph Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics and chair of the Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester, and Andrew Charlton of LSE, are the co-authors of Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development.

"Opening the door to trade is one thing, but the real challenge is to help developing countries go through it."

This article appeared in The Independent on February 03, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development is an Oxford University Publication. A description of the book and details on how to order a copy are available at: Oxford University Press webpage

Related Links
Andrew Charlton is a Research Officer with CEP's Globalisation programme.

The Independent
Joseph Stiglitz: It takes more than free trade to end poverty

Joseph Stiglitz, a Nobel laureate in economics and chair of the Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester, and Andrew Charlton of LSE, are the co-authors of Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development.

"Opening the door to trade is one thing, but the real challenge is to help developing countries go through it."

This article appeared in The Independent on February 03, 2005
Link to article

Related Publications
Fair Trade for All: How Trade Can Promote Development is an Oxford University Publication. A description of the book and details on how to order a copy are available at: Oxford University Press webpage

Related Links
Andrew Charlton is a Research Officer with CEP's Globalisation programme.

The Independent
New doubt over benefit of schools reform plan

The conclusions of a study by the Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, reject links between greater school choice and improved standards. The research by Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva concludes that "choice and competition does not seem to be generally effective in raising standards".

This article appeared in The Independent on January 31, 2006
Link to article.

Related Publication
CEE Discussion Paper No.056 titled Competition, Choice and Pupil Attainment was published in January 2006.

The Financial Times
A productivity prescription: how the US has pulled away from Europe and Japan

Professor John Van Reenen offers insight into the differences in productivity between individual UK and US companies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 25, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain’t What You Do, It’s the Way that You Do I.T. – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Work Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

The Financial Times
A productivity prescription: how the US has pulled away from Europe and Japan

Professor John Van Reenen offers insight into the differences in productivity between individual UK and US companies.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 25, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain’t What You Do, It’s the Way that You Do I.T. – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Work Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

BBC News
'Bigger the Better' for Workers

Large well-managed companies with a wide global reach provide a happier work-life balance for their employees, a study by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen at the Centre for Economic Performance has suggested.

This article appeared on the BBC News online on 10 January, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

The Financial Times
Work-life balance called into question

Providing employees with a good work-life balance does not lead to higher productivity, according to research published today. The study by three academics at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics finds that the evidence for "the win-win view, espoused by the government, that better work-life balance will improve productivity is rejected" and that "there is no relationship between productivity and work-life balance once good management is accounted for".

This article appeared in The Financial Times on January 10, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
Work-Life Balance, Management Practices and Productivity by Nick Bloom, Toby Kretschmer and John Van Reenen

Related Links
The CEP Productivity and Innovation programme.

The Guardian
Long route to low achievement: 'Widening participation' offers few benefits to those who leave school early

Does Labour still believe that colleges have a primary duty to seek and entice through their doors people who call it quits with education once they have left school? Does "widening participation" remain a core policy? If it does, a new piece of research makes clear that it has a long way to run before success can be claimed. Steven McIntosh comments on the results of his Skills for All research.

This article appeared in The Guardian on January 3, 2006
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of Vocational Qualifications on the Labour Market Outcomes of Low-Achieving School-Leavers by Steven McIntosh, Paper No CEPDP0621, March 2004.

The Returns to Apprenticeship Training by Steven McIntosh, Paper No CEPDP0622, March 2004.

Related Links
Skills for All webpage