London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2007


The Guardian
Colleges soon big enough to go out on their own

The latest education bill opens up the possibility that further education colleges can create their own qualifications. The bill's proposal is nonetheless heading towards a more flexible situation than is found in most of Europe, says Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in The Guardian on December 4, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

24 Dash
Grammar schools labelled 'ghettos for wealthy'

Researchers based at the London School of Economics also found that the decision to expand grammar education in Northern Ireland had boosted average exam results. Access to grammar schools in Northern Ireland was widened in 1989 so another 15 per cent of all pupils could attend. The research said: ‘An expansion of grammar school places is potentially beneficial to both (higher and lower income) groups but access to grammar schools is very unequal.’

This article appeared in 24 Dash online on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Grammars 'need to open up'

According to latest research, a grammar school education can have "net positive effects", but selection systems are skewed hugely in favour of well-off families. One study by the Centre for Economic Performance — based on selective education in Northern Ireland — found that expanding the number of grammar school places in the late 1980s boosted GCSE grades across the province.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Grammars 'need to open up'

According to latest research, a grammar school education can have "net positive effects", but selection systems are skewed hugely in favour of well-off families. One study by the Centre for Economic Performance — based on selective education in Northern Ireland — found that expanding the number of grammar school places in the late 1980s boosted GCSE grades across the province.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on November 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

New York Times
The MBA under attack

A study by Nick Bloom, an assistant economics professor at Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, concludes that companies using the most widely accepted management theories taught by business schools outperform their peers in productivity, sales growth and return on capital.

This article appeared in the New York Times on November 17, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What drives good management around the world? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Guardian
Grammar school policy

A report earlier from the London School of Economics said allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools would boost their results and overall national performance.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
Educational Effects of Widening Access to the Academic Track: A Natural Experiment by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.85, August 2007

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Guardian
Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Guardian
Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Guardian
Test results on education policy

Sandra McNally (CEP) responds to Jenni Russell’s ‘Comment’ (Guardian on November 14th) that the positive results from Labour Government’s education policies have been meagre.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece 10/3 Winter 2005 Article: In brief: Evaluating ‘Excellence in Cities' by Sandra McNally, December 2005 Available to order
Sandra McNally’s publications

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

The Economist
What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Economist
What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Economist
What witch doctors?

Article refers to the study Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter, conducted by academics including John Van Reenen, professor of economics and director of the Centre for Economic Performance at London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Economist on November 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Secondary Education.com
Long hours in class do not lead to better jobs

Children who spend long hours in school do not necessarily perform better, or gain better jobs or higher earnings in adult life, according to a report by Professor Jörn-Steffen Pischke, of the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in Secondary Education online on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Impact of the Length of the School Year on Student Performance and Earnings: Evidence from the German Short School Years in The Economic Journal, 117, October 2007, pp.1216-1242

Related links
Steve Pischke webpage
Labour Markets webpage

The Financial Times
Too much social mobility in Britain

The common belief that Britain is socially immobile comes from a study published in 2005 by the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on November 8, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC Radio
Radio Northampton

Sandra McNally gave an interview discussing government proposals to extend the school leaving age to 18.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Northampton on November 5, 2007
[No link to broadcast]

Related Publications
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Stephen Machin publications page
Sandra McNally publications page

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Guardian
Too many graduates? Apparently not

A report published this week by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally from the London School of Economics, found there is no problem of "over-supply" or "over-qualification" of university leavers.

This article appeared in the Guardian on November 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007
Stephen Machin publications page
Sandra McNally publications page

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

ATL Education News - UK
Students 'study wrong subjects'

According to the Times, a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance has shown that students are studying the wrong subjects at university, which is leading to oversupply in certain sectors and shortages in others.

This article appeared in ATL Education News - UK on October 31, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
Higher Education and the Labour Market by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally.
Article in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2 Autumn 2007

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

CEP Visitor
Victor Lavy

Victor Lavy is a professor of economics at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and at University of London, Royal Holloway and spends each Christmas Term working with the Education Programme at CEE on educational interventions and social programmes.

Contact Details

Tel: +44 (0)1784 41 4190
Email: victor.lavy@rhul.ac.uk

The Scotsman
Court blow to Microsoft as it loses appeal against record £343m fine

The Centre for Economic Performance said:
"First, by illegally bundling Windows Media Player into its ubiquitous Windows operating system, Microsoft has driven rival media player firms out of the market.
"Second, by refusing to provide critical technical information about Windows, it has severely disadvantaged rival manufacturers who needed this information to make their server-operating systems run smoothly with Windows-dominated personal computer operating systems."

This article appeared in The Scotsman on September 18, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The European Commission versus Microsoft: Competition Policy in High-Tech Industries by Christos Genakos, Kai Uwe Kühn and John Van Reenen
Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
Christos Genakos webpage
Kai Uwe Kühn webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

THES
Laurie Taylor column

What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
Link to article [subscribers only]

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

THES
Laurie Taylor column

What is your degree worth to an employer? According to Anna Vignoles, a leading education economist, student tuition fees should be based on the worth of the degree to employers. Dr Anna Vignoles is a research associate in the Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE.

This article appeared in the THES on September 14, 2007
Link to article [subscribers only]

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Economist
Holy alliance

The government claims to be following parents' wishes in opening more religious schools: they tend to be popular and often have good exam results. Yet a study in 2006 by researchers at the London School of Economics showed that this apparent success was due to the social characteristics of the children they admitted, rather than to superior teaching or ethos.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006 by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva
In brief: 'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Economist
Holy alliance

The government claims to be following parents' wishes in opening more religious schools: they tend to be popular and often have good exam results. Yet a study in 2006 by researchers at the London School of Economics showed that this apparent success was due to the social characteristics of the children they admitted, rather than to superior teaching or ethos.

This article appeared in The Economist on September 13, 2007
Link to article

Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006 by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva
In brief: 'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Smith names head of new migration advisory body

The home secretary today announced that David Metcalf would be the new chair of the committee set up to control the flow and quality of migrant workers. Mr Metcalf, professor of industrial relations at LSE, will spearhead the independent Migration Advisory Committee, which will advise ministers on which occupations should qualify as being short of necessary skills.

This article appeared in The Guardian on September 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
BBC News Online
Head named for immigration panel

THES
Repression kick-starts a career in radical violence

Review of What Makes A Terrorist: Economics and the Roots of Terrorism by Alan Kreuger. The book is based on the three Lionel Robbins lectures Alan Kreuger gave at LSE on ‘What Makes a Terrorist’. (subscription only)

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Alan Krueger Princeton University webpage
Professor Alan Krueger was interviewed by Romesh Vaitilingam at the Centre for Economic Performance on 23 February 2006.
Listen to the interview
Lionel Robbins Lectures, 'International Terrorism - Causes and Consquences'
Details

THES
'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

THES
'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

THES
'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

THES
'Surplus' in arts may spur shakeout

Universities should set student tuition fees according to how much a degree subject is valued by employers a leading education economist, Anna Vignoles (Centre for the Economics of Education, London School of Economics), has argued.

This article appeared in the THES on September 7, 2007
Link to article

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education at LSE webpage

LaVocel - Italy
Il gap manageriale del vecchio continente

Tradizionalmente, gli economisti sono stati restii a partecipare al dibattito sul rapporto fra management e produttività. Questo atteggiamento è attribuibile principalmente alla mancanza di dati che documentassero in modo sistematico le diverse pratiche manageriali adottate dalle imprese. Nel corso degli ultimi anni, il Centre for Economic Performance della London School of Economics ha condotto una serie di ricerche finalizzate a colmare questo vuoto. Fra il 2004 ed il 2006 abbiamo misurato sistematicamente le pratiche manageriali di circa 4,000 imprese manifatturiere in 12 paesi, fra l‘Europa, gli Stati Uniti e l’Asia.

This article appeared in LaVocel - Italy on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

LaVocel - Italy
Il gap manageriale del vecchio continente

Tradizionalmente, gli economisti sono stati restii a partecipare al dibattito sul rapporto fra management e produttività. Questo atteggiamento è attribuibile principalmente alla mancanza di dati che documentassero in modo sistematico le diverse pratiche manageriali adottate dalle imprese. Nel corso degli ultimi anni, il Centre for Economic Performance della London School of Economics ha condotto una serie di ricerche finalizzate a colmare questo vuoto. Fra il 2004 ed il 2006 abbiamo misurato sistematicamente le pratiche manageriali di circa 4,000 imprese manifatturiere in 12 paesi, fra l‘Europa, gli Stati Uniti e l’Asia.

This article appeared in LaVocel - Italy on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

LaVocel - Italy
Il gap manageriale del vecchio continente

Tradizionalmente, gli economisti sono stati restii a partecipare al dibattito sul rapporto fra management e produttività. Questo atteggiamento è attribuibile principalmente alla mancanza di dati che documentassero in modo sistematico le diverse pratiche manageriali adottate dalle imprese. Nel corso degli ultimi anni, il Centre for Economic Performance della London School of Economics ha condotto una serie di ricerche finalizzate a colmare questo vuoto. Fra il 2004 ed il 2006 abbiamo misurato sistematicamente le pratiche manageriali di circa 4,000 imprese manifatturiere in 12 paesi, fra l‘Europa, gli Stati Uniti e l’Asia.

This article appeared in LaVocel - Italy on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen.
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
‘Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries’, by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
New research webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

The Guardian
Bouncing into schools

Britain is at the bottom of the European social mobility league table, as John van Reenen and Stephen Machin show in this summer's Fabian Review.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Schools Are the Best Tools for Tackling Social Mobility by John Van Reenen and Stephen Machin in The Fabian Review, Summer 2007: The Education Issue

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Bouncing into schools

Britain is at the bottom of the European social mobility league table, as John van Reenen and Stephen Machin show in this summer's Fabian Review.

This article appeared in The Guardian on August 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Why Schools Are the Best Tools for Tackling Social Mobility by John Van Reenen and Stephen Machin in The Fabian Review, Summer 2007: The Education Issue

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Herald, Scotland
Inspiring a Neet solution

According to a report from the London School of Economics published in June, Scotland's Neet generation of young jobless is costing the country £1.7bn a year in crime, lost productivity and educational under-achievement. Almost one in five young people in Scotland are not in work, education or training, but the £2m a week cost of jobseekers allowance is only a fraction of the real loss to the economy.

This article appeared in the Herald on August 4, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Princes Trust Report
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK, Sandra McNally & Shqiponja Telhaj, April 2007, Download Report

Related Links
Sandra McNally's webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj's webpage
The Prince's Trust website

BBC World Service
Burmese service - International Business Analysis

Linda Yueh discussed China's trade surplus and economic growth on the programme.

The interview was broadcast on the BBC World Service on July 30, 2007
[No link to interview]

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Kathimerini - Greece
Management practice

[No link to article available]

Toffeeweb
Overlooked. Look here.

According to a study carried out for The Prince's Trust by the London School of Economics, published in April, the proportion of NEETS nationally is around 18 per cent, roughly one in five. That's a heck of a lot.

This article appeared online on Toffeeweb on July 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sunday Telegraph
Our ill-trained youth will kick Britain out of the economic elite

Article refers to a report from the House of Lords economic affairs select committee titled Apprenticeship: A Key Route to Skill.
Richard Layard was a member of the Select Committee and Hilary Steedman was 'Specialist Adviser' for the inquiry.

This article appeared in The Sunday Telegraph on July 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Apprenticeship: A Key Route to Skill. Volume 1: Report
House of Lords Select Committee on Economic Affairs. 5th Report of Session 2006-07. Published July 20, 2007
Skills for All Research publications webpage

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Skills for All research webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Brisbane Times
Profile: Andrew Charlton

Profile of Andrew Charlton, the Sydney-born economist, who is a research fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared in the Brisbane Times on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Ozonomics: Inside the Myth of Australia’s Economic Superheroes (2007) by Andrew Charlton
Random House: Australia. Release – July 2007.
Details

Related links
Andrew Charlton webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Youngsters opt to do nothing

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics calculates that the number of neets aged 16 to 24 increased by 15 per cent between 1997 and 2006, from 1.06m to 1.24m.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on July 19, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Economist
Where money seems to talk

In a 2005 book, Richard Layard, a British scholar, said family circumstances, employment and health all mattered more to a sense of well-being than income. Rich countries might be happier than poor ones, but beyond a threshold, the connection weakens, and more cash would not buy more happiness—so the theory goes.

This article appeared in The Economist on July 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

The Wall Street Journal
Risk-loving Americans counter U.S.'s foreign debt

What accounts for Americans’ better performance? In a report last week, Goldman Sachs economist Ed McKelvey points to a recent study by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reene that found U.S.-owned companies in the U.K. are 3% more productive than other multinationals.

This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal on July 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Wall Street Journal
Risk-loving Americans counter U.S.'s foreign debt

What accounts for Americans’ better performance? In a report last week, Goldman Sachs economist Ed McKelvey points to a recent study by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reene that found U.S.-owned companies in the U.K. are 3% more productive than other multinationals.

This article appeared in The Wall Street Journal on July 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter. Report by CEP and McKinsey & Co. Authors: Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practice and Productivity Research webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Daily Mail
How axing grammars let down millions of pupils

A study by Jo Blanden and other researchers confirms that those born poor in Britain have a worse chance of improving their lives than children anywhere else in the developed world. It pointed to the failure of the education system as the overwhelming reason why poor children in Britain have less chance of climbing the ladder and winning good jobs than those in any other wealthy country.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on June 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
UK 'one of worst countries for social mobility'

Working-class children in Britain are less likely to climb the social ladder than in any other developed nation, a report showed yesterday. Prof Steve Machin, from the London School of Economics, which carried out the Sutton Trust study, said: ‘We had a very big expansion of the higher education system in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but contrary to many people's expectations this actually reinforced social immobility.’

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 27, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Expansión, Spain
El día soñado de Brown

John Van Reenen, director del Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics, asegura, en cambio, que las críticas a Brown son ‘un poco injustas’. Según Van Reenen, quienes otorgan el mérito ‘a las reformas de Thatcher, al buen hacer del Banco de Inglaterra o a las importaciones baratas desde China’, olvidan que el Gobierno pudo oponerse a todo ello, pero no lo hizo.
(Source: Lexis Nexis News)

This article appeared in Expansión, Spain on June 26, 2007
[No link available]

Related Publications
Blair's Economic Legacy. 'In brief' article by John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1, Summer 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Northern Echo
Milburn addresses housing problems

This week, a London School of Economics study found that British children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives than in most other wealthy countries. It said ten years of a Labour Government had done no more than prevent the decline in social mobility in the Seventies and Eighties from worsening.

This article appeared in the Northern Echo on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Northern Echo
Milburn addresses housing problems

This week, a London School of Economics study found that British children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives than in most other wealthy countries. It said ten years of a Labour Government had done no more than prevent the decline in social mobility in the Seventies and Eighties from worsening.

This article appeared in the Northern Echo on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Firstrung - London, UK
Social mobility in Britain lower than other advanced countries and declining

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) have compared the life chances of British children with those in other advanced countries for a study sponsored by the Sutton Trust, and the results are disturbing.

This article appeared in Firstrung.com on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Adonis wants to raise GCSE top grades target to 80 per cent

Lord Adonis' call for an ‘80 per cent education system’ came the day after the Sutton Trust education think-tank revealed preliminary research from the London School of Economics showing UK social mobility is lower than in most other developed countries.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Times
News in brief - Children 'in a poverty trap'

Children from poorer families have far less chance of improving their lives in Britain than those in most other wealthy countries. But a London School of Economics study found that a decline in social mobility in the 1970s and 1980s has levelled off, suggesting that new Labour may have stopped things getting very much worse.

This article appeared in The Times on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Labour's school reforms 'haven't helped the poor'

The Sutton Trust released the preliminary research findings of the social mobility study which it commissioned from academics at the London School of Economics. The study said: ‘Social mobility remains weak in the UK compared to other developed nations.’

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 26, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
UK productivity still trails competitors

Gordon Brown’s ambition of matching the growth in productivity of the world’s big economies appears as elusive as ever after research, by the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE published on Monday said there was ‘still a major productivity challenge’.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
UK Productivity During the Blair Era by Raffaella Sadun. CEP Policy Briefing, June 2007
Americans Do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.788, April 2007
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006

Related links
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

BBC News
Education 'fails poorer children'

Professor Steve Machin, from CEP, said: "We had a very big expansion of the higher education system in the late 1980s and early 1990s, but contrary to many people's expectations this actually reinforced social immobility."

This interview was broadcast on BBC News at 10 O'Clock on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Le Monde
Sandra McNally: Sous Tony Blair, le système éducatif britannique s'est incontestablement amélioré

Sandra McNally est chercheuse au Centre for Economic Performance de la London School of Economics et auteur d’une analyse sur la politique éducative de Tony Blair .

This article appeared in Le Monde (France) on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Has Labour Delivered on the Policy Priorities of ‘Education, Education, Education’? by Sandra McNally
Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analyses Listing

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Q and A: grammar school policy

A report earlier this month from the London School of Economics said allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools would boost their results and overall national performance.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1, Summer 2007


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC Radio 4
Today Programme

Special report on new LSE research, in conjunction with the Sutton Trust, on the current state of social mobility in Britain.

This report was broadcast at 7.09a.m. on BBC Radio 4's the Today Programme on June 25, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sunday Times
Kicking away the social ladder

Article refers to a 2005 study by Stephen Machin’s group at LSE, which found the US and Britain were less mobile than other advanced countries.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on June 24, 2007
Link to article

Related publications
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Globe and Mail
Bogota's urban happiness movement

London School of Economics professor Richard Layard, who wrote the seminal Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, was an adviser to Tony Blair's first Labour government.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail (Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Globe and Mail
Bogota's urban happiness movement

London School of Economics professor Richard Layard, who wrote the seminal Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, was an adviser to Tony Blair's first Labour government.

This article appeared in the Globe and Mail (Canada) on June 23, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Kansas City News
Pursuit of happiness

Recently, Lord Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, argued that happiness should be taught alongside core subjects such as English and math.

This article appeared in the Kansas City Star on June 19, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness and the Teaching of Values by Richard Layard in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
The 2007 Ashby Lecture, University of Cambridge: ‘The Teaching of Values’ by Richard Layard Download
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard Details

Related links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness research webpage

Belfast Telegraph
Exams plan spiralling out of control

The 11-plus is on the way out, but the jury is still out on the question of academic selection. Grammar school supporters are already highlighting a report from the London School of Economics which found that selective education benefited children from a working class background.

This article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph on June 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Public Finance Magazine
Faith primary schools no better than secular, study finds

Pupils in faith primary schools do no better than children in secular state primaries once covert selection has been eliminated, research from the London School of Economics has found.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils? by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva in CentrePiece 12/1
Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils, CEE Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Trumpet
Schools flunk dropout test

The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Trumpet
Schools flunk dropout test

The education system in Britain is failing. The London School of Economics labels the 1 million unemployed, non-student young people in Britain a “lost generation” that is proportionally twice the size of those in Germany and France.

This article appeared in The Trumpet on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Parents 'buying' places at grammar schools

A report published this week by the London School of Economics said that a grammar school education could be very beneficial to children from poor backgrounds. But it warned that many could not get in because admissions procedures were skewed against them.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Parents 'buying' places at grammar schools

A report published this week by the London School of Economics said that a grammar school education could be very beneficial to children from poor backgrounds. But it warned that many could not get in because admissions procedures were skewed against them.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Parents 'buying' places at grammar schools

A report published this week by the London School of Economics said that a grammar school education could be very beneficial to children from poor backgrounds. But it warned that many could not get in because admissions procedures were skewed against them.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on June 15, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally in CentrePiece 12/1

Related links
Eric Maurin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Grammar schools improve grades

Allowing children from working-class backgrounds into grammar schools boosts their results and overall national performance, according to new research from the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in The Guardian on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Exam results boosted by the grammar effect

The findings, from researchers at the respected Centre for Economic Performance, cast doubt on Conservative policy on grammar schools after the party abandoned support for selective education.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Exam results boosted by the grammar effect

The findings, from researchers at the respected Centre for Economic Performance, cast doubt on Conservative policy on grammar schools after the party abandoned support for selective education.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Exam results boosted by the grammar effect

The findings, from researchers at the respected Centre for Economic Performance, cast doubt on Conservative policy on grammar schools after the party abandoned support for selective education.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Study shows grammars benefit poor pupils

The row over academic selection was reignited last night after a study by the London School of Economics concluded that more grammar schools would boost the results of working class pupils and raise education standards nationwide.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on June 13, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 1 Summer 2007
Widening Access to Grammar Schools: the Educational Impact in Northern Ireland by Eric Maurin and Sandra McNally

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Eric Maurin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Times
Home ground disadvantage

Get ready to challenge your assumptions – inner-city schools aren’t so bad after all say researchers from the London School of Economics. The study, Urban Density and Pupil Attainment, found evidence of small but significant benefits from education in schools in densely urbanised settings.

This article appeared in The Times on June 12, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Urban Density and Pupil Attainment’ by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.80, Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE, May 2007.

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Observer
If you're not a fat cat or a footballer, new problems keep on popping up

Incidentally, people who still have social consciences and who are worried about the way the world is going can take heart from a paper by the eminent labour economist David Metcalf, of the London School of Economics. Its very title - Why has the British national minimum wage had little or no impact on employment? - gives the game away. For all those predictions by (usually) right-wing economists that a minimum wage would produce economic disaster, it hasn't happened. Indeed, Metcalf concludes: 'The national minimum wage has raised the real and relative pay of low-paid workers, tempered wage inequality and contributed to the narrowing of the gender wage gap.' It has not had adverse effects on employment; nor has it been inflationary.

This article appeared in The Observer on June 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
'Why has the British National Minimum Wage Had Little or No Impact on Employment?' by David Metcalf, Discussion Paper No.781, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE, April 2007.

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Observer
How we have grown up in 50 years of change

Article refers to research by Anna Vignoles, of the LSE's Centre for Economics of Education, which has shown surprising changes in school life for the thousands of people in the study.

This article appeared in The Observer on May 20, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
Education Policy in the UK by Anna Vignoles and Stephen Machin, CEE Discussion Paper No.57, March 2006

Related Links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Independent
'Happiness tsar' warns of therapy funding shortage

Professor Richard Layard is concerned that patients suffering from anxiety and depression will not benefit unless cash is set aside for training up therapists.

This article appeared in The Independent on May 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard
Download

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

Clare Hall Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values'
Specialists Are Needed To Teach Values, Says Richard Layard

Delivering the Ashby Lecture at the University of Cambridge on Wednesday, 2nd May, Richard Layard will argue that we need a new specialty of teachers specifically trained to teach values. There are scientifically evaluated approaches to the teaching of emotional intelligence; they need to be used in every school.

More and more children are suffering from emotional disturbance and a major purpose of schools must be to help develop good and happy people. The study of Personal, Social and Health Education should continue to the age of 18, and university applicants should give evidence of good project work in this area.

Download the lecture 'The teaching of values'(PDF)

Related Links
Clare Hall, Ashby Lecture: 'Happiness and Values' webpage

Richard Layard's Home Page

Richard Layard's Wellbeing Research Programme


BBC Radio 4
The Today Programme

The Joseph Rowntree Foundation - which funds research into social policy - brought out a report on poverty among ethnic minority groups. Professor Stephen Machin interviewed on Radio 4.

This article appeared BBC Radio 4's The Today Programme on April 30, 2007
Link to broadcast

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

The Independent
The illusion of inclusion

According to The Cost of Exclusion by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, roughly one in five young people face a lifetime on benefits, running the risk of falling into crime and mental or physical ill-health.

This article appeared in The Independent on April 11, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Young People Now - April 11, 2007
Youth exclusion: Youth exlusion is costing the UK billions, say economists
Action to reduce youth exclusion could save the UK economy £3,650m a year, a report by the Centre for Economic Performance this week claims.
The Herald - April 11, 2007
A lesson for labour
Evening News 24 - April 11, 2007
the £62m cost of the jobless generation

Newsletter - April 11, 2007
Lack of jobs for young people 'is costing us millions'
Evening Chronicle - April 11, 2007
Huge cost of young jobless
Western Morning News - April 11, 2007
£5m cost of the lost generation
[No links available]

The Times
The 'lost generation' of young and jobless

The lifetime cost of educational underachievement will be £18 billion according the the report, The Cost of Exclusion by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. The report shows that by re-engaging young people and helping them turn their lives around, the UK economy could save billions.

This article appeared in The Times on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group - The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK
by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Herald
A disaster for Scotland

Research from the Centre for Economic Performance for The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group finds that 35,000 young people not in education, employment or training (NEETS) are costing Scotland a staggering £1.7bn a year. This is a disaster for the Scottish economy but worse - a tragedy for the thousands of youngsters who face a bleak future of long-term unemployment, poor health and early death.

This Editorial article appeared in The Herald on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Daily Record - April 10, 2007
£1.7 billion - the cost of lost generation
Focus - April 10, 2007
One in five young people rely on handouts
Evening Standard - April 10, 2007
£3.6bn cost of lost youth [No link]
Belfast Telegraph - April 10, 2007
Unemployed teens costing province £1.6m every week [No link]

The Daily Telegraph
Labour's failure has lost us a generation

A large-scale study for The Prince's Trust by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj of the Centre for Economic Performance says that a 'lost generation' of unemployed young people is costing the economy billions of pounds a year in benefits, youth crime and educational under-achievement.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on April 10, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
A joint report from The Prince's Trust and The Royal Bank of Scotland Group The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj
Details and access to download.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Allafrica.com
Zimbabwe: students' financial aid schemes vital

Article refers to 2005 research by LSE for the Sutton Trust, an education charity, which showed children born to poor families in Britain are less likely to fulfil their potential than in other developed countries.

This article appeared in Allafrica.com on March 29, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. Report for the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Financial Times
Race to close productivity gap

Britain has been slowly but steadily catching up in productivity to the US. Professor John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance points out: “Since the mid-1990s, American productivity growth has been exceptionally strong, so we have done well even to keep up.”

This article appeared in The Financial Times on March 21, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Measuring and Explaining Management Practices Across Firms and Countries by Nick Bloom and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No.716, March 2006
It Ain’t What You Do It’s the Way that You Do IT – Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates, by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Further Press Cuttings
The Financial Times, Wednesday 22 March
The quest for improved productivity
Quote by John Van Reenen used again in article by Scheherazade Daneshkhu discussing the latest Budget announcement from Gordon Brown.
Link to article

BBC News 24
World business report

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the progress of the WTO meeting in Jakarta. [No direct link]

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 - World on March 21, 2007
[No direct link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

BBC News 24
World business report

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the progress of the WTO meeting in Jakarta. [No direct link]

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 - World on March 21, 2007
[No direct link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

BBC News 24
World business report

Linda Yueh was interviewed to discuss the progress of the WTO meeting in Jakarta. [No direct link]

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 - World on March 21, 2007
[No direct link available]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Christian Today
Faith schools better when competitive, research suggests

Research suggests that faith schools that operate their own admissions get better results when they have competition. Using a sample of 200,000 pupils in England, an institute at the London School of Economics (LSE) has published a study of school choice, the BBC reports. Faith schools - outside local authority control - were compared with community schools to measure the impact of parental choice. Researchers say when a faith school has no competition, its results are lower.

This article appeared in Christian Today on March 16, 2007
Link to article

Related Publication
The Educational Impact of Parental Choice and School Competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
School choice could 'widen divisions'

Writing in the journal CentrePiece, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva from CEP say that Tony Blair's drive to give parents more choice over schools for their children could widen social divisions.

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. In CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07.
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph
School choice 'could widen divisions'

In an article in CentrePiece magazine (published by the Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva examine the impact of parental choice on schools.

This article appeared in the Northamptonshire Evening Telegraph on March 14, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. In CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC News - UK
Faith schools get competitive

Faith schools which operate their own admissions get better results when they have competition, research suggests. An institute at the London School of Economics has published a study of school choice, using a sample of 200,000 pupils in England. The research from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, carried out by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, examines the impact of parental choice on schools, using a sample of 2,400 schools in south-east England.

This article appeared in the BBC News - UK
Link to article

Related Publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. Published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Discussion Paper No.056, Centre for the Economics of Education, CEP, January 2006.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
School admissions: the race for a place

Places at some oversubscribed schools can be allocated by lottery, also known as random selection. Dr Anna Vignoles, Co-Director of the Centre for the Economics of Education at CEP, says it breaks the link between where a pupil lives and a school. ‘It is likely to lead to less social segregation and some reduction in the prices of houses around good schools.’

This article appeared in The Guardian on March 6, 2007
Link to article

Related Links
Anna Vignoles is a Co-Director (Institute of Education branch) of the Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Details
Education & Skills Research Programme webpage

BBC
BBC News 24

Linda Yueh was interviewed on BBC News 24 to discuss Tesco's foray into China.

Related Links
Linda Yueh's webpage

The Guardian
Wellbeing is not about the individual - it's about relationships

While starting from urgent and appropriate concerns, both Oliver James and Richard Layard, cited by Madeleine Bunting as key players in the "politics of wellbeing", risk promoting the very individualism they identify as being the cause of 'social recession'.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 22, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related publication
The Depression Report by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage

For a full list of articles in the Politics of Wellbeing debate click here


La Tribune
Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage

La Tribune
Comment certains pays ont réduit le chômage demasse

An article by Richard Layard discussing unemployment was published in the French business newspaper La Tribune.

This article appeared in the French newspaper La Tribune
[No direct link to article available.]

Related Publications
Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market by Richard Layard, Stephen Nickell and Richard Jackman. New edition published by Oxford University Press, January 2005.
Details

‘Full Employment for Europe’ by Richard Layard. Chapter in Global Competitiveness Report 2005-2006 Policies Underpinning Rising Prosperity by Augusto Lopez-Claros, Michael E. Porter and Klaus Schwab. Palgrave McMillan. September 2005.
Details

Related link
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Nickell webpage
Richard Jackman webpage

The Guardian
Wanted: an Erich Fromm party

…don’t look either to short-term fixes like the cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) advocated by Richard Layard. Instead, turn to the work of Erich Fromm…

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 20, 2007
Link to article

For a full list of articles in the Guardian's Comment Is Free Politics of Wellbeing debate, click here

Related Publications
The Depression Report by Richard Layard


Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
The Mental Health Policy Group webpage


Socialist Worker
Downwardly mobile

A Report from the Centre for Economic Performance for the Sutton Trust published in 2005 is cited in this article in the Socialist Worker (Issue 2037, 10th February). The article says that it is harder for disadvantaged people to progress in society now than it was when the present Prime Minister came to office.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker online on February 7, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.026, June 2002.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Washington Post
Political happiness

Despite a sharp rise in material wealth over the past 40 years the average level of reported happiness has remained static. The factoid is most often wielded by the political left in its battle against excessive materialism, inequality and competition which, it believes, are at the root of the “status anxiety” that makes us less happy than we should be. In Britain, for example, one of the key figures in the happiness debate is Richard Layard, the LSE economics professor and Labour peer, who advocates higher taxes on the rich to mitigate status anxiety.

This article appeared on the joint Washington Post.com/Newsweek online website on February 3, 2007
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

News-Medical.net
Money cannot buy you happiness

"For example, as Professor Richard Layard of the LSE emphasises, improving health, particularly mental health, would be an effective way of making people ...
This artical featured in News-Medical.net on 29 January, 2007. Link to article

Related Links
The Depression Report Click to download
Richard Layard's webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Research Programme webpage


The Statesman, Ghana
Moving up the social ladder is never easy

Article refers to LSE research that has shown that early cognitive development, measured in children as young as 22 months, predicts final qualifications about 25 years later.

This article appeared in the Statesman on January 8, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Pre-school Educational Inequality? British Children in the 1970 Cohort Leon Feinstein, September 1998 Paper No' CEPDP0404

Related Links
Leon Feinstein is an Associate of the Education and Skills research programme at CEP. He is also the Director of the Centre for Research on the Wider Benefits of Learning, Institute of Education, London. VIew webpage

Financial Times
Moving up the social ladder is never easy

Even before formal education starts, parenting has arguably an even more important effect. Researchers at LSE have shown that early cognitive development, measured in children as young as 22 months, predicts final qualifications about 25 years later. The explanation is intuitive: parents set the standards that most children aspire to surpass.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on January 6, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Pre-school Educational Inequality? British Children in the 1970 Cohort Leon Feinstein, September 1998 Paper No' CEPDP0404

Related Links
Leon Feinstein is an Associate of the Education and Skills research programme at CEP. He is also the Director of the Centre for Research on the Wider Benefits of Learning, Institute of Education, London. VIew webpage

Public Finance Magazine
School segregation not decreasing

Researchers from the London School of Economics, in their study Are schools drifting apart? published by the DfES on 2 January, found there is still a 30 percentile difference in the average ability of pupils entering the best and worst state secondary schools in England — a gap that has not changed since 1996.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on January 5, 2007
Link to article.

Related Publications
Are Schools Drifting Apart? Intake Stratification in English Secondary Schools by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj
December 2006, Paper No. CEEDP0064 - Link to paper

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons' webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj's webpage
Centre for the Economic Of Education homepage
Education and Skills research programme webpage

BBC Radio 4
The World Tonight

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the programme discussing the reports that the Chinese city of Guangzhou is expected to become the first in the country to reach the economic standard of developed nations.

There is no link to this broadcast
The World Tonight homepage.

Also on
CNBC Europe
Squawk Box
Linda Yueh also featured in broadcast discussing China’s economic outlook.
Squawk Box homepage

Related Links
Linda Yueh's webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage