London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2008


Republika, Serbia
Crni (finansijski) oktobar u Velikoj Britaniji

... je nego u svim vecim razvijenijim državama (‘Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain’, Centre for Economic Performance – LSE, 2007).

This article appeared in Republika, Serbia.
Related Publications
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling
by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Tories target 'problem families.' to break cycle of dependency

Shadow secretary Chris Grayling suggests that entire "problem families" should be targeted for intervention by social services to break a cycle of benefit dependency and educational failure that limits social mobility in Britain. Labour insists that social mobility is rising, but a London School of Economics study concluded that it has not improved in the past 30 years.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on the 9th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Tories target 'problem families.' to break cycle of dependency

Shadow secretary Chris Grayling suggests that entire "problem families" should be targeted for intervention by social services to break a cycle of benefit dependency and educational failure that limits social mobility in Britain. Labour insists that social mobility is rising, but a London School of Economics study concluded that it has not improved in the past 30 years.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on the 9th December 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

Al Jazeera English
News

Linda Yueh on the rise of China and impact on the U.S.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jeezera English on the 21st November 2008.
[No link avaliable]

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
UTVi (India) - “Business Scene” discussing the financial crisis and Citigroup.
CBC Radio One (Canada) - “The Current” interviewed on flagship morning programme on the wider implications of China’s economic stimulus package

Islington Gazette
Job losses 'to hit bars and eateries'

Professor Christopher Pissarides , of the London School of Economics, agreed the outlook for bar and restaurant workers in Islington was grim. He said: "I would expect bars and restaurants to be hit because they are small companies that cannot afford to keep workers on if there is a short-term fall in demand."

This article appeared in the Islington Gazette on the 19th November 2008.
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Prospect
More mobile than we think

In 2005, the Sutton Trust funded and publicised the work of three economists—Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Paul Gregg —who burrowed into the British cohort studies (social data on a big sample of individuals born in a particular year) and found a significant decline in upward mobility between the cohort born in 1958 and that born in 1970. They attributed this fall to the growing income inequality of the 1980s and to the expansion of higher education being monopolised by the better off.

This article appeared in Prospect on the 19th November 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

The Guardian
Response I did not stammer when the Queen asked me about the meltdown

Professor Luis Garicano, director of research at the department of management, London School of Economics, comments on the Queen discussing the economy with him.

This article appeared in the The Guardian on the 18th of November 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Professor Luis Garicano is an Associate of the Productivity and Innovation Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance.
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Al Jazeera English
Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”

Al Jazeera English
Frost Over the World

Linda Yueh spoke on the G20 economic summit.

This interview was broadcast on Al Jazeera on the 14th of November 2008.
(No link avaliable)

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Linda Yueh was also interviewed on:
BBC Four“World News Today”
BBC World News “World News Today”
BBC Radio 5 “Breakfast”

Employment for Students
'university is increasing social mobility'

University students looking for graduate jobs in London may be interested to hear that Labour policy is helping to improve social mobility, according to new government research. And it cites research from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, which shows the mobility improvements only started to take effect in 2000.

This article appeared on Employment for Students website on the 4th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

Employment for Students
'university is increasing social mobility'

University students looking for graduate jobs in London may be interested to hear that Labour policy is helping to improve social mobility, according to new government research. And it cites research from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies, which shows the mobility improvements only started to take effect in 2000.

This article appeared on Employment for Students website on the 4th of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

Scotsman
Is victory truly in sight in the class struggle?

Privileges and the lack of them are difficult to measure: Figures published yesterday suggest that, between 1970 and 2000, social mobility neither improved nor deteriorated. However, findings from Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies seem to show that there have been encouraging signs since then. But are we really becoming more socially mobile and is the evidence overwhelming? Jo Blanden, a lecturer in economics and associate of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, is not convinced. She is quick to point out that Britain was already starting from a poor threshold.

This article appeared in the Scotsman on the 4th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility? by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

The Guardian
The seizing up eases up

Leader looks at new government findings about social mobility and disagrees with the view that the "class gap" is closing. Cites report from LSE which suggested that chances to progress at work have increased since 2000.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 4th November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 , Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Britain's class divide is over

Richard Dickens of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE and the University of Sussex, said: "After a very long period of increase, there is some evidence that inequality is finally falling due to increases in employment among women in particular."

This article appeared in the The Daily Telegraph on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Three background papers by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight, are published by the Centre for Economic Performance and the Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion.
Link to papers

Link to the report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation, "The Changing Pattern of Earnings: Employees, Migrants and Low-Paid Families’ by Richard Dickens and Abigail McKnight

Related Links
Richard Dickens webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Public Service Online
Social mobility 'improved since 2000'

Findings provided for the unit by Bristol University, the London School of Economics and the Institute of Fiscal Studies have indicated that a child's academic achievement - measured by the number of GCSEs they pass - is becoming less dependent on their family's wealth.

This article appeared in Public Service Online on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008.
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobilityin Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

ePolitix
Social Mobility rising says No.10

The paper suggested that between 1970 and 2000, social mobility - the ability of people to move up the income ladder into different jobs from their parents - did not change.

This article appeared on ePolitix website on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Getting on, getting ahead: A discussion paper: analysing the trends and drivers of social mobility’ published by the Cabinet Office Strategy Unit, November 2008. ‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007 Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

BBC Radio 4
The Today Programme

‘Easier’ to get on and up in Britain
’Striking’ fall in equality? A study, from academics at Bristol University and the London School of Economics, finds that family background appears to have less influence on educational attainment than it once did. The research was discussed on the programme broadcast at 7.50a.m.

This was broadcast on Radio 4 on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

BBC News
Social mobility 'improving' in UK

Gordon Brown has made social mobility a focus of his premiership.

This article appeared on the BBC News website on the 3rd of November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
'A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2), Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Class gap closing, research claims

Research to be published tomorrow by Downing Street will claim that one of the most enduring and damaging criticisms of the government, that it has presided over a decline in social mobility, is no longer true. Despite the low mobility of recent years, disclosed in a report by the London School of Economics that compared children born in the 1950s and 1970s, some have managed to move up the income scale.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on the 3rd November 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications ‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) , Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage webpage

The Daily Mail
Britain's class divide is all in the past claims Labour research

Government research is set to reveal a narrowing class divide, despite Gordon Brown claiming Labour had much to achieve on this four months ago. Labour is set to publish the research, by academics at the London School of Economics and Bristol University, as proof that young people's social standing is no longer linked to that of their parents

This article appeared in Daily Mail on November 2nd 2008.

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

The Times
Changing class grows easier

Despite the low mobility of recent years, disclosed in a report by the London School of Economics that compared children born in the 1950s and 1970s, some have managed to move up the income scale.

This article appeared in the Times on November 1st, 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
'A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’ by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 .

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage

The Guardian
Children worry about careers more than bullying

That finding tallies with a separate study, also published today, conducted by the influential educational charity the Sutton Trust. The London School of Economics researchers found that widespread poor education and careers advice is preventing large numbers of academically able pupils from non-privileged homes going on to higher education.

This article was published in the Guardian on the 28th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Information, Advice and Guidance in Schools: A Brief Literature Review’ by Sandra McNally. Appendix 3 in Report to the National Council for Educational Excellence from the Sutton Trust, Increasing Higher Education Participation Amongst Disadvantaged Young People and Schools in Poor Communities Link to report

Related Link
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Poor advice hinders university access

Report finds 'swathes' of state school pupils are missing out due to inadequate careers guidance Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, who carried out a review of research on schools' careers and education guidance packages, said they had not improved.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28th October 2008. Link to article.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Employment for Students
Graduates from top universities earn more

University leavers looking for graduate jobs in London earn more on average if they are from top ranking institutions, it has been claimed. According to the London School of Economics (LSE), students from the top 25 per cent of universities in the UK can expect to earn up to 16 per cent more than those with an equivalent degree from an institution in the bottom quarter, reports the Journal.

This article appeared in Employment for Students website on 27th October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece, Vol 13 Issue 2 Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
Link to CEE discussion papers

Related links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Independent
Child poverty costs Britain at least 25bn a year, study says

Continuing child poverty means that Britain has to pay at least 25 billion pounds a year due to the extra burden on state services. Jo Blanden and Steve Machin of CEP wrote the background report to this study from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

This article appeared in the Independent on 23rd October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Estimating the costs of child poverty by Donald Hirsch is based on three reports, one of which is ‘The GDP Cost of the Lost Earning Potential of Adults Who Grew Up in Poverty’ by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Stephen Machin.

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Kirstine Hansen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programm webpage

The Guardian
Cost of child poverty is at least 25bn a year

Researchers have found that the government spends £12bn a year on services to remedy consequences of childhood deprivation such as poor health, low educational attainment, crime and antisocial behaviour. Although not mentioned, Jo Blanden and Steve Machin of CEP wrote the background report to this report from the Joseph Rowntree Foundation.

This article appeared in the Guardian on the 23rd of October 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Estimating the costs of child poverty by Donald Hirsch is based on three reports, one of which is ‘The GDP Cost of the Lost Earning Potential of Adults Who Grew Up in Poverty’ by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Stephen Machin

Link to article
Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Kirstine Hansen webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC 4
World News Today

Linda Yueh of the CEP Globalisation Programme gave an interview on China's economic growth prospects.

This interview was shown on BBC4, World News Today on the 20th October 2008.
No link avaliable.

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further Interviews
BBC World Service - World Update
CNN - Business International

Times Higher Education
Charge Elite Students More

Researchers affiliated with the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, say a university education significantly raises earning power, particularly among graduates of Britain's elite universities.

This article appeared in Times Higher Education, News in Brief on October 16th 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
‘Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?’by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece.


Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Economics of Education webpage

Witan Jardine
Graduates from top universities earn more

Degrees obtained from top universities "significantly" increase earnings of graduates, new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) has revealed.

This article appeared in Witan Jardine on October 15th 2008.

Related Publications
"Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For?" by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of Centrepiece Vol 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Women in Technology
Earning power 'boosted' by best universities

Graduates who have attended what are deemed to be the UK's top universities are likely to earn "significantly more money during their career, a new study has found. According to the London School of Economics (LSE), university degrees in general boost earning power, but this increases again for graduates of the best 25 universities, the Guardian reports.

This article appeared in Women in Technology on October 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Career Engineer
LSE: Top engineering graduates' will earn significantly more

A university degree significantly raises the earnings of graduates, especially those from the best universities, Iftikhar Hussain, from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, told the Guardian.

This article appeared in the Career Engineer - London UK on October 15th 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers details

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Career Engineer
LSE: Top engineering graduates' will earn significantly more

A university degree significantly raises the earnings of graduates, especially those from the best universities, Iftikhar Hussain, from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, told the Guardian.

This article appeared in the Career Engineer - London UK on October 15th 2008.
Link to article.

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers details

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Guardian
The rich and the rest

Two analyses from the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance shed new light on the economic gulf between the rich and the rest.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Spend it Like Beckham by Andreas Georgiadis and Alan Manning appears in the latest issue of CentrePiece Volume 13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
The article summarises ‘Spend It Like Beckham? Inequality and Redistribution in the UK, 1983- 2004’ by Andreas Georgiadis and Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 816, August 2007.

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Andreas Georgiadis webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Silicon.com
US firms get more out of IT than UK rivals

Three pieces of government-backed research have confirmed that effective use of IT can give companies a "significant" productivity boost. The first paper, 'It ain't what you do it's the way that you do IT' from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that US multi-national enterprises in the UK are eight per cent more productive than their UK counterparts. The researchers said more than 80 per cent of this productivity advantage can be explained by better use of IT.

This article appeared in Silicon.com on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005/6
It Ain't What You Do It's the Way That You Do I.T. - Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth Using US Affiliates by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Office for National Statistics
'Americans do I.T. Better: US Multinationals and the Productivity Miracle’ by Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 788, April 2007

Related Links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Guardian
Degrees from top universities boost earning power

Researchers from the LSE have found that a degree from a university in the top quarter of all universities, such as Oxford or Cambridge, will lead to wages that are 10-16 per cent higher than a degree from a university in the lowest quarter.

This article appeared in the Guardian on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Daily Telegraph
Top universities 'should charge higher fees'

Students at top universities should be prepared to pay extra because they normally earn much more after graduating. The additional cash is needed to fund higher staff salaries at Britain's most prestigious universities, said the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics. Three academics - Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj - analysed the salaries of students graduating from university in 1985, 1990, 1995 and 1999.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on October 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Are the Top Universities Worth Paying For? by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj in the latest issue of CentrePiece Vol13 Issue 2, Autumn 2008.
This article summarises ‘University Quality and Graduate Wages in the UK’ by Iftikhar Hussain, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 99 (forthcoming).
CEE Discussion Papers webpage

Related Links
Iftikhar Hussain webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage



CEE Visitor
Stefanie Lehmann

Stefanie Lehmann is a researcher on the Education and Skills Programme. She is a visitor to CEP from the Bonn Graduate School of Economics, Germany.

The Times
Labour claims to narrow the class divide - at last

Ministers will claim tomorrow that social mobility - people’s ability to move up the income scale and into different jobs from those of their parents - is finally improving. The government will seize on the study, by academics at the London School of Economics and Bristol University, to counter opposition claims that Labour has presided over an entrenching of the class divide and growing income inequality, and that this is one of its biggest policy failures.

Link to article

Related Publications
‘A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility?’Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece 13(2) Autumn 2008.
Sutton Trust: Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007.
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in Centrepeice Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005.


Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage




Socialist Worker
Class politics are alive and kicking in Britain

A report for the London School of Economics last year found that social mobility in Britain hadn’t improved in 30 years, and the country was “stuck at the bottom of international league tables when it comes to social mobility”.

This article appeared in the Socialist Worker on September 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Independent
Faith schools work. Until you take the faith away

Figures from the research group, the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, suggest that on average in all English local education authorities, 17.3 per cent of pupils get free school meals; the average in Catholic schools is 12.5 per cent. But as Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance points out, the data do not prove that schools are socially selective.

This article appeared in the Independent on August 31, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?’, by Steve Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Steve Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
The education boom has proved a curse for the poor

Gordon Brown spoke last week: "I want to see a Britain that is far more upwardly mobile ... But it cannot be achieved without people themselves adopting the work ethic, the learning ethic and aiming high." He had warm words for the richness of untapped potential and praised Labour's great leap forward in education, more GCSEs, more degrees - all true and all good.
But on the day he spoke, the nation's social mobility experts assembled at the LSE [CEP]. A roll call of top economists and sociologists arrived at the same devastating conclusion: education has done virtually nothing to improve social mobility. Worse still, as a greater number of people gain more qualifications, the less socially mobile the country has become.

This article appeared in the Guardian on July 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Accounting for Intergenerational Income Persistence: Non-Cognitive Skills, Ability and Education' by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Lindsey Macmillan, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 73, September 2006
Cycles of Disadvantage by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons, in CentrePiece, Volume 11, Issue 1, Summer 2006
This article summarises The Persistence of Poverty across Generations: A View from two British Cohorts by Jo Blanden and Steve Gibbons, published for the Joseph Rowntree Foundation by The Policy Press

Life Opportunities: The Evidence on the UK's Declining Social Mobility Jo Blanden, Centre for Economic Performance Election Analysis, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, February 2005
More details on the research discussed here are in Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust. This paper has been published as: Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, 'Educational Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility' in Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles (eds.) What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK, Princeton University Press, 2005.

'Mobility Has Fallen' by Jo Blanden, in CentrePiece Volume 7, Issue 2 Summer 2002 [No link available]
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
This paper has been published as: 'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Chapter 6 in M. Corak (ed.), Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp:122-146. Details
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 517, January 2002

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Intergenerational mobility, an issue at the forefront of social policy, was the subject of an important one-day conference at the London School of Economics on June 23 2008. Programme details
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Red Orbit (Dallas, TX, USA)
Disproportionality in special needs education in England

Ethnic, gender, and socioeconomic groups not only experience different educational and special educational outcomes, but in an unequal society, they also experience different social outcomes in terms of health, employment, income, and so on (see, e.g., Blanden, Gregg, & Machin, 2005;…)
CEP/Sutton Trust Report: 'Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America’ by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg, Alissa Goodman and Steve Machin referenced in article on disproportionality in special needs education research.

This article appeared Red Orbit (Dallas, TX, USA) on June 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Sutton Trust Report with CEP, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Steve Machin, April 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
Bright pupils missing out on university, study shows

About 60,000 school leavers a year who were among the highest academic performers in their class are failing to reach university, new research shows. Anna Vignoles, the lead researcher at the Institute of Education, University of London [and associate at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE], said: ‘This research shows clearly that the main reason why poorer students do not go to university to the same extent as their wealthier peers is that they have weaker academic achievement in school.’

This article appeared in the Guardian on June 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
Bright pupils missing out on university, study shows

About 60,000 school leavers a year who were among the highest academic performers in their class are failing to reach university, new research shows. Anna Vignoles, the lead researcher at the Institute of Education, University of London [and associate at the Centre for the Economics of Education, LSE], said: ‘This research shows clearly that the main reason why poorer students do not go to university to the same extent as their wealthier peers is that they have weaker academic achievement in school.’

This article appeared in the Guardian on June 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Pulse
How to...Influence commissioning of mental health care

Work by Lord Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, showed that mental health is Britain’s biggest social problem, costing 4% of the GDP. The political push he generated resulted in the introduction of the DHs Improving Access to Psychological Therapies (IAPT) programme.

This article appeared in Pulse on June 9, 2008
Link to article (then subscribe)

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

Independent - Ireland
A trouble shared can be a trouble doubled

Just when happiness economist Richard Layard is trying to persuade the British to dispose of their stiff upper lips and embrace cognitive therapy, along come a crowd of Yanks telling them that that the Royals' mantra was right all along: "Don't explain, don't complain."

This article appeared in the Independent - Ireland on June 8, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard

Related links Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage

Resource Investor
Will the credit crunch lead to recession?

In an article for Resource Investor, Nick Bloom writes "Much like the credit crunch today, the Great Depression began with a stock market crash and a meltdown of the financial system."

This article appeared in Resource Investor (Herndon, VA, USA) on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Will the Credit Crunch Lead to Recession? by Nick Bloom. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, Spring 2008
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 12, Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Joint McKinsey/CEP Report, Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter by Nick Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy and John Van Reenen, July 2007.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

ThirdSector
Opinion: Our crucial role in tackling inequality

Last year, a report by the London School of Economics showed that parental background continues to exert a very powerful influence on the academic progress of children.

This article appeared in ThirdSector on June 4, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

LSE Magazine
Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

LSE Magazine
Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

LSE Magazine
Low social mobility in UK

Two articles on CEP research appear in the latest issue of LSE Magazine:
Low social mobility in UK
Social mobility in the UK remains at the low level it was for those born in 1970, with recent generations of children’s educational outcomes still overwhelmingly tied to their parents’ income. This is one of the key findings from a report by Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Stephen Machin of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance, funded by the Sutton Trust.
p.33

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Can pay regulation kill?
Findings of research by Professor John Van Reenen of LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance and Carol Propper of Bristol University suggest that a ten per cent increase in the gap between the wages paid to NHS nurses and those paid to women working in the private sector locally raises the fatality rate among people admitted with a heart attack by five per cent.
p.34

Related Publications 'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance' by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research, Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online.

The articles appeared in LSE Magazine on June 1, 2008
Link to magazine

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Washington Post (USA)
The gifts and costs of greed

But, as Richard Layard and others have pointed out so forcefully, this consumerism, this restless seeking after yet more possessions, does not make us happy.

This article appeared in The Washington Post on May 30, 2008
Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage


The Daily Telegraph
Class warriors who betrayed the underclass

A report last year by Professor Steve Machin, of the London School of Economics, showed that the expansion of higher education in the 1980s and 1990s entrenched social immobility because the poor's schools were not good enough to exploit new opportunities. Children from poor homes were found to be just as likely to under-perform now as 30 years ago, while the link between adults' education and that of their children is far stronger in Britain than in many other developed nations. The report said of social mobility: ‘The trend of worsening has stopped, but the UK remains very low in the developed world rankings.’

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on May 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust, Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Article also mentioned in
The Australian
Tuesday 13 May
The more things change, the more they stay the same

Times of Malta
Promoting resilience in the classroom

As the eminent British economist Richard Layard says in his recent theory on the science of happiness, happy and socially competent individuals are in the end more productive in both schools and society.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta on May 9, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
The Wellbeing Research Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Reuters
Risks mount for stressed traders as markets gyrate

Two Citigroup workers , including a trader, fell from office blocks in London and Miami in 2006. ‘The pressure on traders when the market goes wrong is always huge,’ said Tim Leunig, a lecturer in the economic history department at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE). ‘There will be a lot of bitten fingernails today. It is exactly the same, you can lose you job, your standard of living and you won't get it back, that's pressure.’

This article appeared in Reuters news on May 5, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Also in
Birmingham Post
Rise in suicides as credit crunch stress gets to traders

Guardian
Clinics at work cut sicknotes, says study

David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said there would be a huge bonus for the economy if similar schemes could be introduced in the 13 industrial sectors with the poorest occupational health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 1, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

Guardian
Clinics at work cut sicknotes, says study

David Marsden, a professor at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said there would be a huge bonus for the economy if similar schemes could be introduced in the 13 industrial sectors with the poorest occupational health.

This article appeared in the Guardian on May 1, 2008
Link to article

Related publication
Royal Mail Report, The Value of Rude Health by David Marsden and Simone Moriconi, May 2008

Related links
The paper will be given at the Labour Market Seminar on Tuesday 17 June, 2008, Room R405, CEP Conference Room, 12:45-2pm
Details
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Enterprise LSE Limited webpage

Financial Times
Visible measure that help reduce absenteeism

According to a London School of Economics' analysis of health and well-being policies across the group, such initiatives have saved the Royal Mail as much as £227m over three years by cutting absence across its 180,000 strong workforce from seven to just under five per cent between 2004 and 2007.

The article is referring to the Centre for Economic Performance Royal Mail study by David Marsden.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on April 17, 2008
[No working link available]

Related Publications
'Human Resource Practices and Employment Stability: Evidence from the European Structure of Earning Survey - ESES', by Simone Moriconi and David Marsden, work in progress
'Incentive Pay Systems and the Management of Human Resources in France and Great Britain', by Richard Belfield, Salima Benhamou and David Marsden, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.796, May 2007

Related links
David Marsden webpage
Simone Moriconi webpage
Pay Inequalities and Economic Performance (PIEP) Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Financial Times - Adviser
A perfect storm is brewing

Article by Nicolas Bloom, fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.
"One of the most outstanding effects of the recent credit crunch is the huge surge in stock market volatility. Going back 70 years to the Great Depression - this was the last time that volatility was persistently high."

This article appeared in the Financial Times Adviser Online on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Will the credit crunch lead to recession?’ by Nick Bloom.
Article in forthcoming CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, May 2008.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Financial Times - Adviser
A perfect storm is brewing

Article by Nicolas Bloom, fellow at the Centre for Economic Performance.
"One of the most outstanding effects of the recent credit crunch is the huge surge in stock market volatility. Going back 70 years to the Great Depression - this was the last time that volatility was persistently high."

This article appeared in the Financial Times Adviser Online on April 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Will the credit crunch lead to recession?’ by Nick Bloom.
Article in forthcoming CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 1, May 2008.

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed commenting on China's sovereign wealth fund investments in energy companies such as BP and Total.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on April 16, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

The Guardian
Left behind, and unhappier

Comment by Jonathan Rutherford that includes references to research from CEP with the Sutton Trust on social mobility; the Good Childhood Enquiry (CEP Well-being of Children Seminars beginning Summer 2008) and CEP research for The Primary Review (University of Cambridge).

This article appeared in the Guardian on April 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Summary of the Report download
Aims for Primary Education: The Changing National Context. Primary Review Research Survey 1/3, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, January 2008

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage
Well-being of Children Seminars webpage

BBC News
Richer, healthier but not happier

Article by Steve Schifferes (Economics Reporter, BBC) that refers to research on social mobility from the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared on BBC News online on April 8, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Summary of the Report download

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Handelsblatt
Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Handelsblatt
Mehr Wettbewerb kann töen - zentrale Lohnfindung auch

Competition study covered in the "Wissenswert" column, together with a related study by Carol Propper, Emma Hall and John Van Reenen.

This article appeared in Handelsblatt (Germany) on March 3, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance’ by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
'Centralised Pay Setting Kills Finds New Research', Press Release, LSE Press and Information News online

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Economist
Is it worth it?

Researchers at the Centre for the Economics of Education have used data on earnings, social class and education to distinguish the effects of private schooling from other advantages that students at such schools may enjoy (such as having richer, better-educated parents). Francis Green, one of the researchers said “Private education is a consumption good, not just an investment. Long gone are the days of spartan dormitories and cold showers—kids in the private sector now have fabulous science labs and sports facilities, and access to a huge range of subjects and activities.”

This article appeared in the Economist on February 28, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for private and state school teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education Programme webpage

The Times
Closer look at peer groups

Does segregation matter? It’s a question hanging in the air this week after research by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The study suggests that low-achieving pupils go to low-ranking schools – and high achievers go to high-ranking schools. Researchers Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj say, in CentrePiece (Winter 2008): ‘The average ability of pupils going into the “best” comprehensive schools is way above the average ability in the worst.’ In religious and grammar schools the difference is even more marked.

This article appeared in the Times on February 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Sunday Times
The week's news in review - Smoking risk to babies

Middle-class women who smoke while pregnant do little harm to their unborn babies. Smokers from poorer backgrounds do risk damage to their children, but only because they combine cigarettes with alcohol and a poor diet. Emma Tominey, from the London School of Economics, studied data on 3,368 mothers and 6,860 children taken between 1973 and 2000. Smoking during pregnancy reduced birth weight by 5.6 per cent, but when adjusted for other factors it accounted for just 1.8 per cent.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on February 17, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE Publications webpage

Also in
The Sunday Times
This divorce payout madness is getting out of control - Comment by Rod Liddle (Scroll down)
Women who smoke during the first five months of pregnancy do not harm their babies at all – and if they smoke during the latter stages of pregnancy the effect upon their unborn child is “negligible”, provided they eat decent food.

Monday 18 February
The Star, South Africa
Smoking in pregnancy harmless - for the rich
Middle-class women who smoke in early pregnancy do almost no harm to their unborn baby. A new study has concluded that only women from poorer backgrounds damage their babies by smoking, because they tend to combine it with alcohol and a poor diet. The study by the London School of Economics also casts doubt on the traditional view that smoking during early pregnancy does the most harm to the baby.
Access by subscription

Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK
New research downplays impact of smokingi n pregnancy

In her research report, Emma Tominey, research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, conceded however that smoking is not completely harmless.

This article appeared in Kiddicare - Peterborough, UK on February 15, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Further press cutting
Thursday 14 February
Tobacco.org
Smoking during pregnancy hurts poor most
A British report suggests smoking while pregnant may be less damaging to a foetus than many people have been led to believe. Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said the effects are almost negligible if women stop smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, The Times reported Thursday.

BBC News - UK
Top state schools 'take the best'

The pattern has emerged because of a "lack of choice", say researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance, based in London.

This article appeared on BBC News - UK on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
ATL (the Education Union) News
Top schools 'cream off' pupils
Research conducted by the Centre for Economic Performance has shown that faith and grammar schools take the best pupils at age 11.

The Times
Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Times
Damage to unborn baby from smoking 'negligible' in the first five months

Smoking in pregnancy is far less damaging to the unborn baby than commonly supposed, detailed analysis suggests. If women give up smoking by the fifth month of pregnancy, the effect on the baby is negligible, the study found. And even if they do not, the effect on birthweight is surprisingly small. The study by Emma Tominey, a research assistant at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, throws new light on government efforts to stop women smoking when they become pregnant.

This article appeared in The Times on February 14, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
In brief: Smoking During Pregnancy by Emma Tominey in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article in CentrePiece is based on 'Maternal Smoking During Pregnancy and Early Child Outcomes' by Emma Tominey, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.828, October 2007

Related links
Emma Tominey webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Huffington Post - New York, NY, USA
The media lucky sperm club

A new book titled Management Practice & Productivity: Why They Matter, is based on a study by Nick Bloom …, and John Van Reenen of the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post - New York, NY, USA on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Bloom, Dowdy, Dorgan and Van Reenen (2007), Management Practice and Productivity: Why They Matter
For full details of the survey methodology, including all the questions, see Bloom and Van Reenen (2006), ‘Measuring and Explaining Management Practices across Firms and Nations’, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 716 and forthcoming in the Quarterly Journal of Economics
What Drives Good Management Around the World? by Nick Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 2, Autumn 2007
Nick Bloom’s Management Practices Publication webpage

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
Christos Genakos webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Daily Mail
State schools are being 'divided along class lines into grammars or ghettos'

While grammars select pupils using an ability test open to all, top performing comprehensives tend to be located in affluent areas and effectively select by mortgage the London School of Economics warns.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Also in
Evening Standard
State schools are being 'divided along class lines into grammars or ghettos'
Many comprehensives are either ‘grammars’ or ‘ghettos’ because schools are still divided by ability, a study says today. Bright children from better-off backgrounds do well in sought-after comprehensives while pupils in poor areas tend to end up struggling in low-performing sink schools. The divide shows little sign of diminishing despite years of Labour policies aimed at boosting social mobility, say researchers from the London School of Economics.

Daily Telegraph
Top state schools 'still skim off the best pupils'

Children from middle-class backgrounds are still dominating the best state schools, an authoritative report has claimed. The study by the Centre for Economic Performance, part of the London School of Economics, lays bare the failings of the comprehensive education system. Faith-based secondary schools and grammar schools cherry-pick the most talented children at the age of 11, the reports says.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on February 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
School Segregation and its Consequences by Steve Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj in CentrePiece Volume 12 Issue 3, Winter 2007/08
The article summarises the following CEE Discussion Papers: CEEDP063 and CEEDP064

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Financial Times
Hard work ahead to promote apprenticeships

In an article co-written with Iain Vallance (former president of CBI), Professor Richard Layard says: "Now at last a government has acknowledged that for very many people the best way to learn is while earning - through apprenticeship. It is this, linked to part-time education relevant to the job, that is going to close our skills gap."

This article appeared in the Financial Times on February 10, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Channel 4 - News
Factcheck: More police, less crime under Labour?

The effects of extra police on crime are surprisingly slippery to measure, says Olivier Marie, an LSE Research Economist at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article appeared on C4 News on January 31, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can More Police Resources Reduce Crime? by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
CEP Election Analysis, Reducing Crime: More Police, More Prisons or More Pay? by Olivier Marie, April 2005
'Crime and Police Resources: The Street Crime Initiative' by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.680, March 2005
'Crime and Benefit Sanctions' by Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.645, August 2004

Related links
Olivier Marie webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Press Association
Schools policy 'causes segregation'

Dr Steve Gibbons, research associate at the London School of Economics, said increasing competition between schools led to more social segregation. ‘There is some evidence that competition works but the bulk of the evidence internationally suggests that it doesn't,’ Dr Gibbons told the House of Commons schools select committee. His own research focusing on primary schools found that giving parents more choice and encouraging schools to compete for pupils could increase divisions between rich and poor.

This article appeared in Press Association on January 30, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
The Educational Impact of Parental Choice and School Competition by Steve Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006/07
Choice, Competition and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No. 56, January 2006
'Competition and Accessibility in School Markets: Empirical Analysis Using Boundary Discontinuities' by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, in Improving School Accountability: Check-ups or Choice edited by Timothy Gronberg and Dennis Jansen (Elsevier)
‘Urban Density and Pupil Attainment’ by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) Discussion Paper No. 80, May 2007


Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Steve Gibbons Publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

RBC Daily (Russia)
Linda Yueh interviewed

Linda Yueh was interviewed on the effects of a US slowdown on the Chinese economy.

This article appeared in RBC Daily (Russia) on January 29, 2008
Link to article

Related Links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Further broadcast news
Australian Broadcasting Corporation - 'Late Night Live'
Linda Yueh was interviewed on Australian Broadcasting Corporation, 'Late Night Live' to discuss the global economic outlook.

The Economist
Paying a deadly price

Researchers — Emma Hall and Carol Propper of Bristol University, and John Van Reenen of the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance — investigate the impact on medical care of imposing virtually uniform pay rates in the NHS throughout England, even though wages in the private sector vary widely among regions.

This article appeared in The Economist on January 24, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Can Pay Regulation Kill? Panel Data Evidence on the Effect of Labor Markets on Hospital Performance by Emma Hall, Carol Propper and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.843, January 2008
Press Release on LSE Press and Information News webpage.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Emma Hall webpage
Carol Propper webpage

Further press cuttings
Wednesday 23 January
Guardian - Policy briefs
Pay problems for nurses
New research from the Centre for Economic Performance paints a bleak picture of how centralised pay for nurses impacts on patient care.
[No link available]

BBC News
Private schools' gain over state?

Now, though, new research from economists at the London School of Economics has highlighted one measurable way in which state schools are losing a valuable resource, namely teachers, to the independent sector. In their study of Competition for Private and State School Teachers, the LSE economists argue that there is a ‘loss’ to state schools, and an equivalent ‘bonus’ to private schools, in the net flow of publicly-trained teachers into the private sector.

This article appeared on BBC News on January 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for Private and State School Teachers by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 94, January 2008
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Failure to teach three Rs 'damaging economy'

Researchers at the London School of Economics say that children from working class areas are being sent to the worst schools and are struggling to master basic literacy and numeracy.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 19, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Birmingham Post
A huge contribution to the economy of the region
The university's [Birmingham] economic impact on Birmingham and the West Midlands is particularly interesting in the light of a study published last week, which says Britain is less productive than France, Germany and the United States because primary school children are failing to master the three Rs. Apparently, our workers' output is up to 25 per cent lower because they have failed to develop literacy and numeracy skills by the time they leave school. The study, by experts at the London School of Economics, found that a good grounding in basic skills at primary school is crucial to later success in the workplace.
[No link available]

The Guardian
Scrapping admissions system would 'reduce inequality'

Scrapping the school admissions system that allocates places by postcode would help reduce inequality in achievement between rich and poor pupils, according to research published today by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally.

This article appeared in the Guardian on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Guardian
Minister warns schools accused of breaking law on admissions
A paper commissioned by the independent Alexander inquiry into primary education in England says that scrapping the system would do much "to level the playing field". Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally of London University argue that the home advantage "discriminates in favour of those who can afford to choose exactly where they live".

The Times
Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.

The Times
Middle class 'monopolise' the best schools

The Cambridge Primary Review – the biggest study of primary schools for decades – recommends that catchment areas should be scrapped because only wealthy parents can afford to buy houses next to the best primaries. Instead, oversubscribed schools would use a lottery system. The research, by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, from the University of London, found that admissions procedures exacerbated inequalities.

This article appeared in The Times on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
Press Association
End catchment areas, report urges
Research published as part of the Cambridge University-based Primary Review called for a radical overhaul of school admissions to give working class families more choice. Professor Stephen Machin and Dr Sandra McNally, from the University of London, warned that divisions between rich and poor have been incrasingin recent decades. "It is possible that some aspects of primary education discriminate in favour of higher income groups and thereby exacerbate existing inequalities", the report said.

Daily Telegraph
Which skills are vital to the British economy?

Britain's productivity lags as much as 25 per cent behind economic competitors such as Germany, France and the United States because workers lack basic skills in reading, writing and arithmetic, according to a report by researchers at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Further press cuttings
IntheNews.uk
Primary schools 'need debate'
Concentrating on educating children so they can help Britain compete in the global economy may have its drawbacks, the Primary Review has warned.

Daily Mail
Schools' failure at three R's is 'putting the economy at risk'

A study, by experts at the London School of Economics, found a good grounding in the three Rs at primary school is crucial to later success in the workplace.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on January 18, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Aims for Primary Education: the changing national context by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Research Survey 1/3. The Primary Review Interim Report.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Article also appeared in:
This is Money.co.uk
Economy 'at risk' from failure at three Rs
ThisisLondon.co.uk
Schools' failure at three R's is 'putting the economy at risk

Daily Telegraph
Men 'find it harder to climb social ladder'

Men's chances of rising up the social scale in Britain have stalled because of greater competition from women and a slower rate of growth for top jobs, a study published yesterday by Oxford University reported. Their report is embarrassing for the Government, coming on the back of research by the London School of Economics that said the potential for children born in 2000 to move to a higher income bracket than their parents was as low as it was for children born in 1970.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on January 13, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Original 2005 Sutton Trust Report – Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Project Summary Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report – Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Research Programme webpage

Sunday Times
Private education boosts income

Attending a private school can boost your income by nearly 20 per cent. Researchers from the London School of Economics looked at the earning power of those born in 1958 and 1970. They found that the better teachers and smaller classes offered by independent schools were worth 19 per cent in extra income. By 2000, those educated in the private sector were earning about £ 5,000 a year more than their state school colleagues.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times January 13, 2008
[No link.]

Related Publications
Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper No.94, ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu.
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, paper by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu
The research on independent schools – ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ and ‘The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education’, two studies by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu – were presented at a Nuffield Foundation seminar in Oxford on Friday 11 January 2008.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
'The Economic Role of Independent Schools in Britain' research project webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
Private schools still 'reproduce inequalities'

Francis Green and co-author Stephen Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) and professor of economics at University College London, say: "Since selection into the [independent schools], despite some bursaries and the assisted places scheme, is primarily based on families' ability to pay, and given the substantial returns achieved, it is hard to escape the conclusion that private schools have served to reproduce inequalities in British society."

This article appeared in the Guardian on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Competition for Private and State School Teachers' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008
'The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
A private education can boost earnings by a fifth

Academics at the London School of Economics said the private school "premium" of better exam results and admission to the top universities was worth 19 per cent in extra income to pupils, irrespective of parents' wealth. Professor Francis Green's (Centre for the Economics of Education) research shows that the gap between the independent and state sectors has been increasing over the past 50 years as above-inflation fee increases enable headmasters to employ more staff and improve facilities faster. This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
'Competition for Private and State School Teachers' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.94, January 2008
'The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education' by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

ATL Education News - UK
Inequalities developed at private schools

Research carried out at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics suggests that there is a widening gap in attainment between pupils from state schools and those from private schools.

This article appeared in the ATL Education News - UK on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Competition for Private and State School Teachers by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 94, January 2008
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu, forthcoming.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

IntheNews.uk
Private schools under attack

Professor Stephen Machin concludes independent schools' existence is widening social inequality in the UK.

This article appeared in IntheNews.uk online on January 11, 2008
Link to article

Related Publications
Forthcoming CEE Discussion Paper No.94, ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu.
The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education, paper by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu
The research on independent schools – ‘Competition for Private and State School Teachers’ and ‘The Changing Economic Returns to Private Education’, two studies by Francis Green, Stephen Machin, Richard Murphy and Yu Zhu – were presented at a Nuffield Foundation seminar in Oxford on Friday 11 January 2008.

Related links
Francis Green webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Yu Zhu webpage
'The Economic Role of Independent Schools in Britain' research project webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage