London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2010


NewsKF
How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

NewsKF
How much my house worth?

[first published in The Wall Street Journal on 25 November 2010]
2007 real estate boom has raised housing prices by more than 100%, according to a study by Luis Garicano professor at the London School of Economics. According to the same report, the Spanish market accounted for two thirds of the units built in Europe between 1999 and 2007.

This article appeared in News FK on 6 December 2010 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Observer
Can a Christmas pudding ever be worth £250?

Third, many of us have read the works of the wonderful Richard Layard and digested the notion that stuff, per se, does not make you happy. Friends do, communities do, interests do, doing good does: but stuff?

This article appeared in the Observer on the 5th December 2010 link to article

Related publications
‘The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders’ the Centre for Economic Performance’s Mental Health Policy Group, June 2006 Happiness: Lessons from a New Science (2005), Richard Layard details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

The Times Educational Supplement
Research reveals academy disparity

Plans to allow every school to become an academy will reinforce inequalities in England's education system, new research has claimed. A study published in the Centre for Economic Performance's Centrepiece magazine concludes that schools approved for academy status are "significantly" more advantaged than those approved under Labour.

This article appeared in The Times Educational Supplement on November 19, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
Note on Academy School Policy Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Policy Analysis, July 2010
Academy schools: who benefits? by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. In CentrePiece 15 (2) Autumn 2010

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Truthout
The debt problems of the European periphery

Article co-authored by Peter Boone, associate at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics.
Last week's renewed anxiety over bond market collapse in Europe's periphery should come as no surprise. Greece's EU/IMF program heaps more public debt onto a nation that is already insolvent, and Ireland is now on the same track. Despite massive fiscal cuts and several years of deep recession Greece and Ireland will accumulate 150% of GNP in debt by 2014. A new road is necessary: The burden of financial failure should be shared with the culprits and not only born by the victims.

This article appeared in Truthout on November 17, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

The Independent
The Coalition doesn't need to reinvent the Blairite wheel

Comment. It is likely that some of the coalitions’ reforms will succeed, and some will fail. It is mentioned that a study by Zack Cooper and others at the LSE came to the conclusion that patients were more likely to expire where the provider of NHS services is a monopoly provider.

This article appeared in The Independent on November 16, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Zack Cooper webpage
Zack Cooper CEP publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Computing.co.uk
Council tackles youth unemployment using data from IT systems

Research undertaken by the London School of Economics showed that each person classed as NEET costs the taxpayer £97,000 over the course of their lifetime.

This article appeared on Computing.co.uk on October 12, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Joint CEP and Princes Trust Report, April 2007.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC Today
What is the social value of sport?

How will the government measure the value of the different areas in which it plans implement its cuts? Correspondent Tim Franks considers the value of sport in the time of austerity, and interviews Richard Layard on the disadvantage of using the normal model of GNP to calculate effect of spending cuts.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC Today programme (7.20am) on October 8, 2010
Link to interview

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

SecEd
Warning over tuition fees

Researchers Richard Murphy and Steve Machin, from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, looked at what has happened to unregulated fees for overseas and post-graduate students in 20 universities.

This article appeared in SecEd on October 7, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
‘Increasing university income from home and overseas students: what impact for social mobility?’, Report for the Sutton Trust by Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, September 1010.
Download

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Guardian - crib sheet 05.10.10
What's Browne and sticky?

But all Porter will say is that tuition fees shouldn't be spent on staff salaries, and: "I dont see why students should have to pay more. I think universities need to concentrate on providing high quality education."
Isn't that a bit vague? asks Humphrys. A bit?
Meantime we wait. The Sutton Trust tells us Browne could price poorer students right out of the most high-status universities while Will Hutton makes a plea for fairness.

This article appeared in the Guardian - Crib sheet 05.10.10 - Education on October 5, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
'Increasing University Income from Home and Overseas Students: What Impact for Social Mobility'. Report for the Sutton Trust by Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, September 2010.

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Independent
Letters: Perspectives on teaching methods - Faith schools no better

Alan Sykes (letter, 4 October) suggests that church schools are "popular", and this is because they provide "an excellent all-round education". In 2007, researchers at the London School of Economics studied the performance of children who lived in the same area and had similar family backgrounds: they reported that religious affiliation had little impact on primary schools' effectiveness in teaching core subjects.

This article appeared in The Independent on October 5, 2010
Link to article

Related publications
The educational impact of parental choice and school competition by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva. Published in CentrePiece 11/3 Winter 2006-07
Competition, Choice and Pupil Achievement by Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.056, CEP, January 2006.
'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?', Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No 72, November 2006
'In brief: Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?', Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, in CentrePiece Vol 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007, pp.24-25.

Related Links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Poor students will be priced out by high tuition fees, warns charity

Top universities could raise their fees five-fold if ministers give them free rein, says Sutton Trust

Top universities will price out poor students with a five-fold hike to tuition fees if ministers give them free rein over what they charge, an influential education charity warns today. The Sutton Trust study analysed how much 20 universities charge undergraduates from outside the European Union, and how much they charge postgraduates from all countries. Universities are allowed to charge whatever they like to these two groups, so a free market already exists.

The researchers, from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that the most prestigious institutions charge twice as much as lower-ranked universities.

This article appeared in The Guardian, on October 4, 2010
Link to article

Related Publications
Increasing University Income from Home and Overseas Students: What impact for social mobility? a report by The Sutton Trust, September 2010.


Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education & Skills Programme webpage
CEE website


Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey)
Top economist voices concern about second global dip

There is a high possibility that a second economic dip in the U.S. economy could occur, triggering a “snowball effect” throughout the rest of the world, according to a prominent London-based economist. “If someone had asked me about the direction of the economy eight months ago, I would have said the risk had receded,” John Van Reenen, the director of the London-based Centre for Economic Performance, an applied economics research center, recently told the Hürriyet Daily News & Economic Review. “But now, looking at recent data, I am much concerned that we may have a second dip and go back to a recession again.”

This article appeared in Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey) on September 20, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
John Van Reenen publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey)
Top economist voices concern about second global dip

There is a high possibility that a second economic dip in the U.S. economy could occur, triggering a “snowball effect” throughout the rest of the world, according to a prominent London-based economist. “If someone had asked me about the direction of the economy eight months ago, I would have said the risk had receded,” John Van Reenen, the director of the London-based Centre for Economic Performance, an applied economics research center, recently told the Hürriyet Daily News & Economic Review. “But now, looking at recent data, I am much concerned that we may have a second dip and go back to a recession again.”

This article appeared in Hurriyet Daily News (Turkey) on September 20, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
John Van Reenen publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
White British pupils ‘make less progress' than ethnic minorities

A report published in the Economic Journal suggested that differences may be down to children’s relatively poor grasp of English at a young age. It said ethnic minority pupils progressed faster throughout compulsory schooling as their grasp of the language gradually improved. Academics also blamed the pressure of league tables – particularly in poor secondary schools.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 15 September 2010 Link to article

Related publications
‘Ethnicity and Educational Achievement in Compulsory Schooling’, Christian Dustmann, Stephen Machin and Uta Schönberg, The Economic Journal, 120 (August), pp.F272–F297 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Stephen Machin publications webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The Daily Mail
Ethnic pupils go to top of the class at 16 as they overtake white Britons for the first time

For the study, published today in the Economic Journal, researchers analysed exam results for nearly 500,000 pupils. They found that, at the ages of three and five, white British children outperformed their ethnic minority counterparts in tests of vocabulary and making patterns. At seven, in English and maths tests, all ethnic minority groups with the exception of Chinese pupils were behind white British youngsters. But by the end of compulsory schooling, when youngsters take GCSEs, Bangladeshi, Pakistani and black pupils from outside the Caribbean had caught up with their white British classmates, while Indian and Chinese pupils had overtaken them.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 15 September 2010 link to article

Related publications
‘Ethnicity and Educational Achievement in Compulsory Schooling’, Christian Dustmann, Stephen Machin and Uta Schönberg, The Economic Journal, 120 (August), pp.F272–F297 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Stephen Machin publications webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

The State of Apprenticeship in 2010
International Comparisons - Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network.

Forward by Sir Roy Gardner (Chairman, Compass Group plc; Chairman, Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network) August 2010:

I am pleased to commend this report, commissioned by the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network, of which I am Chairman. The Network is a group of senior business leaders committed to the expansion and development of Apprenticeships.

In an earlier report 'The Net Benefit to Employer Investment in Apprenticeship Training' (University of Warwick Institute for Employment Research, 2008) we set out the business case for Apprenticeships. That proved to be an effective medium for communicating the real and tangible benefits to employers. This time we wanted to draw comparisons on the planning and delivery of Apprenticeships in a number of other countries, with a particular focus on employer participation and involvement. Apprenticeships in this country are amongst the world’s best, but we cannot be complacent and we need to know what is happening in competitor countries and what lessons can be learnt

I was re-assured in the recent general election that all the main political parties signalled their support for the expansion of Apprenticeships. I am grateful to Hilary Steedman for producing this report which I am sure will be of interest to employers and employer organisations, Government and policy makers, training organisations, trade unions, awarding bodies, academics in the vocational training field and others. We will continue to argue the case with employers for greater involvement in Apprenticeships - they are good for young people, companies and the economy in general.

Download The State of Apprenticeship in 2010: International Comparisons Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman - CEP Special Report 22


CEE Visitor
Charlotte Geay

Charlotte is visiting CEP from INSEE in France. She is visting the Education Programme from September 2010 until June 2011 and will be working on a project conducted by Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj about the effects of Eastern European migration on educational outcomes in the UK.

Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review (Turkey)
Sabancandl University hosts top economists

John Van Reenen mentioned as amongst top economists attending the 37th Annual Conference of European Association for Research in Industrial Economics (EARIE) organised by Sabanci University, Istanbul.

This article appeared in the Hurriyet Daily News on September 3, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
John Van Reenen publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also in:
Dunya online on September 14, 2010
Link to Article
Prnet: Hurriyet Daily News [ Ulusal Gazeteler] on September 4, 2010
Link to Article
Ekonomi hukuku on September 2, 2010
Link to Article

Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review (Turkey)
Sabancandl University hosts top economists

John Van Reenen mentioned as amongst top economists attending the 37th Annual Conference of European Association for Research in Industrial Economics (EARIE) organised by Sabanci University, Istanbul.

This article appeared in the Hurriyet Daily News on September 3, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
John Van Reenen publications webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Also in:
Dunya online on September 14, 2010
Link to Article
Prnet: Hurriyet Daily News [ Ulusal Gazeteler] on September 4, 2010
Link to Article
Ekonomi hukuku on September 2, 2010
Link to Article

The Daily Telegraph
Good parents, not poverty, shape a child's destiny, claims Clegg

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg yesterday said that good parenting and not poverty was the key component in determining the qualifications and career of their children. It is noted that a A London School of Economics report in 2007 concluded that Britain's social mobility had not improved in 30 years.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 19 August 2010 Link to article

Related publications
‘Recent trends in intergenerational mobility: will the downward trend continue?’ Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece vol 13(2), Autumn 2008.
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

See also publications on LSE Research Online link

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

PS Public Service co.uk
We should be proud of our first 100 days

Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg gave a speech on social mobility in which he said the coalition was committed to making decisions today that will promote a better future, with a more prosperous economy and a fairer society. In his speech he cited research on intergenerational mobility from the Centre for Economic Performance with the Sutton Trust.

This article appeared in PublicService.com
link to article Related publications
‘Recent trends in intergenerational mobility: will the downward trend continue?’ Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece vol 13(2), Autumn 2008.
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

See also publications on LSE Research Online link

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Nick Clegg challenges middle-class domination of universities

Some studies show British children are more likely than those in other developed countries to end up in the same socio-economic class as their parents. A London School of Economics report in 2007 concluded that the UK’s social mobility has not improved in 30 years. Mr Clegg said that the recent expansion of the university sector has not helped that situation because richer children still dominate higher education.

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 18 August 2010 Link to article

Related publications
‘Recent trends in intergenerational mobility: will the downward trend continue?’ Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece vol 13(2), Autumn 2008.
Project Summary Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

See also publications on LSE Research Online link

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Evening Standard
New academies 'will disadvantage the poor'

Research by Professor Stephen Machin and James Vernoit of the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE has warned that the government's plan to turn states schools in semi-independent academies threatens to widen the gap between rich and poor in education.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on 12 July 2010 (no link avaliable)

Related publications
‘Note on Academy School Policy’, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Policy Analysis, July 2010 Link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Schools Interested In Academy Status Very Different From Existing Academies
New findings from CEP Policy Analysis.

A new policy briefing by Professor Stephen Machin and James Vernoit of the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) describes the contrasting characteristics of existing Academy schools and schools that have recently expressed an interest in Academy status. The report, A Note on Academy School Policy, published today, finds that:
  • The Academies programme set up under the Labour government, beginning in 2002, has so far given Academy status to 203 English secondary schools. These schools were more significantly disadvantaged in terms of pre-Academy GCSE attainment, free school meal, special educational needs and ethnic minority status.

  • The new coalition government has written to all headteachers asking if they are interested in Academy status, to which 1,560 schools have responded positively. Schools that have expressed an interest, contrary to the current Academies, are characterised by having a more advantaged pupil population (lower free school meal, special educational needs and ethnic minority status) and superior GCSE attainment.

  • If it follows the expression of interest route to awarding Academy status to schools, the new coalition government's policy on Academy Schools is not, like the previous government's policy, targeted on schools with more disadvantaged pupils. The serious worry that follows is that this will exacerbate already existing educational inequalities.
The report is available at http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/pa011.pdf or you may like to browse our other briefings from the CEP Policy Analyses site.

For further information, contact co-author James Vernoit on 07877 221014 (J.Vernoit@lse.ac.uk); Romesh Vaitilingam on 07768 661095 Romesh@vaitilingam.com; or Helen Durrant on 020 7955 7395 h.durrant@lse.ac.uk.


The Telegraph
Church schools

SIR – Dr Giles Fraser’s article about the problem of “fake worshippers” attempting to get access to church schools regards these families as the problem.
Research by Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva at the London School of Economics shows that the relative success of church schools is due, for the most part, to the parents, rather than the schools' ethos.

This article appeared in The Telegraph on 4 July 2010 Link to article

Related publications
'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?', Steve Gibbons, Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006. Link to article

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

PR-USA.Net
Low Pay Commission's 2010 Report

The Low Pay Commission was pleased that the coalition Government today accepted the recommendations made in its 2010 report. As well as increases to the three minimum wage rates from October 2010, a new apprentice rate will be introduced at £2.50 an hour. This will be the first time apprentice pay will be covered by the minimum wage framework. Professor Stephen Machin, Research Director, Centre for Economic Performance, is a member of the Low Pay Commission.

This article appeared in PR-USA.Net on June 28, 2010
Link to article

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Sky News
Weekend Lunchtime

Linda Yueh was interviewed, speaking on the European economies: UK and the euro crisis.

This interview was broadcast on Sky News on 23 May 2010 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Public Finance Magazine
UK efforts to cut carbon emissions are ineffective

A study from the Centre for Economic Performance based at the London School of Economics, also concluded that carbon taxes hit the poor hardest, as low-income groups spend proportionally more on fuel and energy-intensive goods such as food.

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 5 May 2010 Link to article

Related publications
CEP Election Analysis ‘Climate Change: Consensus on the long-run targets – but will we get policies that deliver?’ by Ralf Martin download
CEP Policy Analysis ‘Still time to reclaim the European Union Emissions Trading System for the European tax payer’ Ralf Martin, Mirabelle Muûls and Ulrich J. Wagner, May 2010 download

CEP Election Analysis
The complete Series, discussing research on some of the key policy battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election

The 2010 General Election is shaping up to be the closest in living memory with a three-horse race between the main parties. It is also an extremely important election as there are tremendous economic problems facing the UK, and the victors of the election will face a series of major challenges as the economy tries to climb out of the deepest recession since the war.

At this critical juncture, it is important to give UK voters the hard information based on rigorous economic analysis that they need to make a reasoned decision on whom to vote for. There is a surfeit of spin from the parties, lobbyists, newspapers and pressure groups with axes to grind and agendas to push. At the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), we want to give, to the best of our ability an informed and balanced view of the evidence on the major issues facing the electorate. The CEP has no 'corporate view' and each of the 11 election analyses expresses the independent views of the authors.

The mission of the CEP since it was established two decades ago has been to conduct world-class and policy-relevant research. We have drawn on our work and on the best of other research to identify and carefully interpret the facts.

We do not ask you to vote for any particular party, but we would urge you to vote; and to vote wisely considering some of the research evidence we present here.

CEP Election Analyses
Each analysis begins with a single page of bullet points summarising key findings followed by 5-10 pages of more in-depth briefing.

Dedicated readers are encouraged to follow the references at the end with even more information regularly updated from the CEP Election Analysis Site

You may also download CEP Election Analysis 2010 - The complete Series, discussing research on some of the key policy battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election (in Adobe PDF)

For further information, contact Romesh Vaitilingam on 07768 661095 (Email: romesh@vaitilingam.com).

The following summary draws out some key facts across all the election analyses.

Summary of Election Analyses

  • Debt and deficits: The greatest challenge facing the next government is how to reduce the budget deficit and stabilise net public debt, which currently stands at £890 billion (£14,500 per person). No party has outlined more than £10 billion of spending cuts when cuts of £37 billion will be needed by 2014 to halve the deficit. Read more...

  • Getting and spending: Before the recession, Labour increased taxes (by 2.3 per cent of GDP between 1997 and 2007) and spending (by 1.2 per cent of GDP). The higher spending on police, education and hospitals has reduced crime and improved schools and healthcare - but public sector productivity has fallen. Read more...

  • Financial regulation: The roots of the global crisis lie in the financial sector where governments were forced to bail out banks deemed 'too big to fail'. Bankruptcy risk must be made credible by reducing the systemic risk of large banks, for example, through steeply progressive taxes on bank size. Read more...

  • Inequality: Global forces such as technological change have pushed up inequality pressures. Labour's policies have constrained the growth of inequality, but not reduced its level. The richest 10 per cent have increased their share of income by £20 billion since 1998 - largely because of bankers' bonuses. Read more...

  • Jobs: Since the recession began, unemployment has risen from 5 per cent to 8 per cent - far less than expected given the huge fall in GDP (over 6 per cent). Unemployment rose faster for youths than adults, but this always happens in recessions. Although the New Deal has helped to contain unemployment, youth joblessness started rising from 2004 - four years before the recession began. Read more...

  • Education: A pupil premium for disadvantaged pupils would help raise standards. City academies and Swedish-style 'free schools' are unlikely to raise overall school performance. Read more...

  • Health: Since 1997, huge increases in NHS spending have helped reduce the inequality of health outcomes by social class. Reforms that increased competition improved hospital quality. Read more...

  • Crime: Crime has fallen since 1997, although 75 per cent of people think it is rising. More police and targeting prolific offenders have helped reduce crime, as have improved opportunities at the lower end of the labour market. Read more...

  • Immigration: The proportion of immigrants of working age rose from 8 per cent in 1995 to 14 per cent by 2009. Immigrants are less likely to be in social housing than the UK-born and are, on average, younger and better educated. Read more...

  • Urban renewal: There is no convincing evidence that area-based initiatives, such as the New Deal for Communities, have reduced differences between rich and poor areas. Read more...

  • Environment. In line with the Kyoto protocol, compared with 1990, UK emissions have been reduced by more than 12.5 per cent since 1990. But the UK has failed to meet its own target of a 20 per cent cut by 2010. To meet the targets efficiently, carbon prices must rise. Read more...
Download CEP Election Analysis 2010 - The complete Series, discussing research on some of the key policy battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election (in Adobe PDF)

World Socialist Web Site
What is the situation facing immigrants and asylum seekers in Britain?

A report by the London School of Economics shows that the UK has a lower share of immigrants in its population (10.2 percent) than Australia (25 percent), the US (13.6 percent), Germany (12.9 percent) and the Netherlands (10.7 percent).

This article appeared on the World Socialist Web Site on 25 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
‘Immigration and the UK Labour Market: The Evidence from Economic Research’ Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Election Analysis, April 2010
CEP Election Analyses
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Related publications
‘On the Relative Gains to Immigration: A Comparison of the Labour Market Position of Indians in the USA, the UK and India’, Jonathan Wadsworth and Augustin de Coulon, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.851, February 2008 Link to article
‘The Labour Market Effects of Immigration’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, CentrePiece article, Centre for Economic Performance, Winter 2007/2008 Link to article
‘The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain’, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006 Link to article

Independent (Education and Careers)
Why the Swedes' idea may backfire

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics comments on plans for parents to set up their own schools being greeted with scepticism.

This article appeared in the Independent on 22 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
'Evaluating Education Policies: the Evidence from Economic Research' CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses 2010

Independent (Education and Careers)
Why the Swedes' idea may backfire

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics comments on plans for parents to set up their own schools being greeted with scepticism.

This article appeared in the Independent on 22 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
'Evaluating Education Policies: the Evidence from Economic Research' CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses 2010

Independent (Education and Careers)
Why the Swedes' idea may backfire

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics comments on plans for parents to set up their own schools being greeted with scepticism.

This article appeared in the Independent on 22 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
'Evaluating Education Policies: the Evidence from Economic Research' CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses 2010

Business World
The view from Taft - by Dante V. Sy: education and crime

The 2010 Annual Conference of the Royal Economic Society (RES) held at the University of Surrey in Guildford, London, revealed another important consequence of education. A paper written and presented by Stephen Machin of University College, Olivier Marie of Maastrich University and Suncica Vujic of the London School of Economics, indicated that spending more on education is a cost-effective way of preventing or cutting down the incidence of crime.

This article appeared in Business World on 21 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olivier Marie webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Stephen Machin publications webpage
Olivier Marie publications webpage

Public Finance
Education policies converge but details remain sketchy

Sandra McNally director of education and skills at the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance agrees that the evidence base for charter and free schools is unconvincing. Positive effects of the Swedish reforms do not last beyond high school, she says, while a report by Stanford University last year found only 17% of US charter schools reported significantly better academic gains than traditional public schools.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 20 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
‘Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research’ CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally
Full series of Election Analyses link
Sandra McNally publications webpage

Business World online
Opinion: Education and crime

The 2010 annual conference of the Royal Economic Society (RES) held at the University of Surrey in Guildford, London, revealed another important consequence of education. A paper written and presented by Stephen Machin of University College, Olivier Marie of Maastrich University, and Suncica Vujic of the London School of Economics indicated that spending more on education is a cost-effective way of preventing or cutting down the incidence of crime.

This article appeared on Business World Online on 21 April 2010. (No link avaliable)

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olivier Marie webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Stephen Machin publications webpage
Olivier Marie publications webpage

Wales online
Breaking the bonds of dependency

Prof Lord Richard Layard of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, argues that a job guarantee scheme must be introduced to impact on the UKs long-term unemployment.

This article appeared in Wales Online on 15 April 2010. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Richard Layard publications webpage

Public Finance Magazine
Education, education, by Sandra McNally

New – or supposedly new – policies on education are a central focus of what the party manifestos, published this week, are offering the electorate. Research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) provides some evidence on the impact of past initiatives and the prospective success of some of the proposed reforms.
Dr Sandra McNally is director of Education and Skills at the Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics and Political Science.
More information on CEP election analyses available from http://cep.lse.ac.uk

This article appeared in Public Finance Magazine on 13 April 2010 Link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
‘Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research’, CEP Election Analysis by Sandra McNally download
Sandra McNally publications webpage
Full series of Election Analyses webpage

CEP Election Analysis
Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research

The latest CEP Election Analysis gives an overview of the research evidence on education policy, one of the key battlegrounds of the 2010 General Election.

The publication is summarised below and can be found in full on the CEP Election Analysis Site

For further information, contact Romesh Vaitilingam on 07768 661095 (Email: romesh@vaitilingam.com) or education election analysis author Sandra McNally (Email: s.mcnally1@lse.ac.uk).

Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research
  • Educational expenditure in the UK has increased enormously - but it is still only just above the OECD average. In 1997/98, expenditure on education and training as a percentage of GDP was 4.9 per cent (the same level as in 1987/88) whereas in 2006, it was 5.9 per cent of GDP. There is robust evidence that the increase in school expenditure between 2002 and 2007 led to a modest increase in educational attainment.

  • Exam performance has improved over time for secondary schools. But the improvement in primary schools since 2000 has been more muted. Exam performance has improved at a faster rate for poorer pupils, although the gap between rich and poor pupils is still substantial.

  • A 'pupil premium' that would follow disadvantaged pupils would help to correct inequities in how funding gets allocated to schools. Research evidence suggests that economically disadvantaged pupils benefit disproportionately from rises in general school expenditure.

  • Early evidence on the effects of the academies programme suggests that the growth in educational attainment for pupils attending academies is no different than for pupils attending other similar schools. Evidence for Sweden does not suggest that the application of a similar system in the UK would raise overall educational attainment.

  • Increasing the entry-level qualifications for teachers is a difficult challenge in view of the high labour market returns available to graduates and the continuing need for more teachers to replace those who leave the profession. Research evidence suggests that 'teacher quality' is important for their pupils' results, but it does not suggest that there is a relationship between 'teacher quality' and teachers' own educational credentials.
Download CEP Election Analysis - Evaluating Education Policies: The Evidence from Economic Research (in Adobe PDF)

The Strengths Foundation
H:is for happiness

Richard [Layard] is a Professor at the London School of Economics. His primary focus is well-being, together with the economic and other benefits this brings to society. You can discover more at his profile page at the LSE

This article appeared on the Strength Foundation's website on 18 March 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

Belfast Telegraph
Comprehensive failure

One study looked at the income progression of a sample of people born in 1958 with a similar group born in 1970. It concluded mobility fell markedly and that it was children from poorer homes who suffered disproportionately (London School of Economics April 2005).

This article appeared in the Belfast Telegraph on 12th March 2010. Link to article

Related Publications
'Social Mobility in Britain: low and falling' in CentrePiece Spring 2005 Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Economist
Failing schools for whom the bell tolls

Sandra McNally of the London School of Economics says new schools may raise standards but won't improve choice much.

This article appeared in the Economist on 11 March 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘A Swedish Model for UK Schools?’ by Helena Holmlund and Sandra McNally, article in CentrePiece Vol 14 Issue 3 Winter 2009/2010

Related links
Helena Holmlund webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

Number10.gov.uk
PM's speech on education

The Prime Minister’s office released a transcript of the PM’s speech on education, delivered at Woodberry Down Community Primary School in Hackney on 23 February 2010. In his speech, Gordon Brown said “And the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has recently argued that the Swedish schools model – if introduced here – would be expensive to implement, and would most likely fail to make real improvements in standards or offer real change in the choices available to the vast majority of parents.”

The transcript of this speech appeared on Number10.gov.uk on 23rd February 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘A Swedish Model for UK Schools?’ by Helena Holmlund and Sandra McNally, article in CentrePiece Vol 14 Issue 3 Winter 2009/2010

Related links
Helena Holmlund webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

Financial Times
LSE questions schools model

The Swedish schools model championed by the Conservatives may not be cost-effective if imported to England, says the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 18th February 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘A Swedish Model for UK Schools?’ by Helena Holmlund and Sandra McNally, article in CentrePiece Vol 14 Issue 3 Winter 2009/2010

Related links
Helena Holmlund webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Swedish schools ‘A leap of faith that won't make a difference'

The Conservatives' plan to adopt a Swedish-style school system was described yesterday as a "leap of faith" that would "not make much difference" in Britain. The scheme, in which parents' groups, charities and not-for-profit organisations run state-funded schools, has been feted by senior Tories. But in a report yesterday, Dr Sandra McNally and Dr Helena Holmlund , from the London School of Economics, argued otherwise. They said the most recent studies of Swedish reform found evidence of "only small positive effects". "Importing the Swedish model may not make very much difference to the UK's status quo," they said. Nick Gibb, the shadow schools minister, described the report as "deeply flawed".

This article appeared in The Daily Telegrpah on 18th February 2010. (No link avalible).

Related publications
‘A Swedish Model for UK Schools?’ by Helena Holmlund and Sandra McNally, article in CentrePiece Vol 14 Issue 3 Winter 2009/2010

Related links
Helena Holmlund webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills programme webpage

The Independent
Three cheers for the Liberal Democrats

The Liberal Democrats have seized on the findings of last week's National Equality Report and decided they would give each poor child a pupil premium of £2,500. "They should be commended for doing so," says an Independent leader column. "Last week's report showed that the richest 10 per cent are more than 100 times as rich as the poorest 10 per cent and that government spending on deprivation is not going to those most in need.

This article appeared in The Independent on 4th February 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
Details

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Sandra McNally webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC News
Ed Balls gives a lesson in conflict

It's not often you hear a Cabinet member telling a Westminster crowd to sit down and work quietly in pairs. But then it is not everyday that England's schools Secretary becomes your teacher for the.... Research by the London School of Economics recently revealed how social and economic background is still the most significant factor influencing a child's outcomes in life.

This article appeared on BBC News on 4th February 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
details

Related links
Contributors to Report: Sandra McNally webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Christian Science Monitor
UK equality bill: unease over legislating equal treatment

The equality bill contains a clause that would make it a public sector duty to narrow the gap between rich and poor, according to John Hills, a social policy expert at the London School of Economics and chair of the National Equality Panel. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to article
Details

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Sandra McNally webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Telegraph
New Labour's biggest losers: the children of the poor

The National Equality Panel Report cites the work of Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin who used “birth cohort studies” to follow the progress of two groups of children, one born in 1958, the other in 1970. Blanden and Machin discovered that a child born in 1958 whose parents were in the bottom quarter of incomes was more likely to end up in a higher income bracket than a child born in comparable circumstances in 1970. Similarly, a child born in 1958 whose parents were in the top quarter of incomes was more likely to end up in a lower income bracket than a comparable child born in 1970. This and other similar studies of intergenerational income mobility show that (according to this measure) Britain has the lowest level of social mobility in the developed world, with the exception of Brazil and the USA.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 2nd February 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
Details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Sandra McNally webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

City AM
Inequality widens as elite grow richer

According to a report published yesterday, the gap between the wealthiest and the most deprived households in the country has widened dramatically over the past 30 years. Professor John Hills of the London School of Economics, said: "The country was hoping that by tolerating the increase in incomes, the benefits would trickle down through higher economic growth. When you look at what the financial system was built on, that becomes a lot more questionable."

This article appeared in City AM on the 28th January 2010 (No link avaliable).

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
Details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Inside Housing
Action needed to tackle social housing inequality

A major study into economic inequality has said more must be done to tackle the wealth gap between social tenants and the rest of the population of the UK.
The study has been produced by the National Equality Panel, a body set up at the request of minister for women and equality Harriet Harman, and chaired by London School of Economics academic professor...

This article appeared in Inside Housing on 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
Details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin Link to article
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC Radio Cornwall
Laurence Reed

Professor John Hills, LSE, discusses the National Equality Report.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Cornwall on 27th January 2010. (No link avaliable)

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
details of report


Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

4NI
The divide between Britain's rich and poor is at its widest in 40 years, a government-backed report has found

Pay and employment differences for men, women and minority groups remain "deep-seated and systemic", the National Equality Panel said. "....how do you create a level playing field when there are such large differences between the resources that different people have available to them," panel chair Professor John Hills, of the London School of Economics, told ...

This article appeared in 4NI on 27th January 2010 Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
Details of report Link

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Build
Rich-Poor Gap At 1970s Levels

Pay and employment differences for men, women and minority groups remain "deep-seated and systemic", the National Equality Panel said. evel playing field when there are such large differences between the resources that different people have available to them," panel chair Professor John Hills, of the London School of Economics, told ...

This article appeared in Builder.co.uk on the 27th January. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to article
Details


Related links
Contributors to Report: Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Local Government Chronicle
Renewal shake-up needed to tackle inequality

The authors, led by Prof John Hills of the London School of Economics, said schools and education were a “pressing priority” for public investment, given the large gaps in educational attainment rates...

This article appeared in Local Government Chronicle on 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Local Government Chronicle
Renewal shake-up needed to tackle inequality

The authors, led by Prof John Hills of the London School of Economics, said schools and education were a “pressing priority” for public investment, given the large gaps in educational attainment rates...

This article appeared in Local Government Chronicle on 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report
details of report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC News
Rich-poor divide 'wider than 40 years ago'

"Most political parties and people subscribe to the ideal of 'equality of opportunity'," panel chair Professor John Hills, of the London School of Economics, told the BBC.

This article appeared on BBC News website on 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Link to report

Details of Report

Related links
Contributors to Report:
Steve Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Financial Times
Social advantages still shape life chances

People's origins shape their life chances from cradle to grave, the biggest study of equality and inequality in Britain has demonstrated. John Hills the panel's chair and professor of social policy at the London School of Economics, quoted.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on the 27th January 2010. Link to article

Related publications
‘An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK. Report of the National Equality Panel’, The Centre for Analysis of Social Exclusion (CASE), London School of Economics, January 27, 2010. Download
Details of report

Report Launch
An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK - Report of the National Equality Panel

'An Anatomy of Economic Inequality in the UK' - the Report of the National Equality Panel - was launched on Wednesday 27 January 2010.

The independent National Equality Panel was set up at the invitation of the Government in 2008 to investigate the relationships between the distributions of various kinds of economic outcome on the one hand and people's characteristics and circumstances on the other. The report addresses questions such as how far up or down do people from different backgrounds typically come in the distributions of earnings, income or wealth.

Professor Steve Machin, one of the panel members writes: 'The National Equality Panel Report is a pathbreaking report that accumulates and interprets a sizeable body of empirical evidence, painting a picture of key aspects of economic and social inequality over time in the UK. A lot of hard work has gone into this comprehensive review of inequality. In my experience, this kind of attention to detail is rarely delivered. The NEP Report however, offers the kind of evidence base that policymakers from all political parties really need in order to make progress in formulating coherent policies - policies to tackle the negative effects that increased inequality has caused.'

Related links: Other CEP contributers to the report