London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2011



The Daily Telegraph
Skill shortages 'deter hirers'

A survey by the British Chambers of Commerce reveals that the majority of firms eager to create new jobs are "frustrated" by skills gaps and onerous regulation. A separate study by the LSE has warned that apprenticeship funding is "dysfunctional"

This article appeared in The Daily Telegraph on 14 December 2011 Link to article

Related publications
Apprenticeship Policy in England: Increasing Skills versus Boosting Young People's Job Prospects', Hilary Steedman, CEP Policy Analysis PA013, November 2011.
'Young People Without Qualifications: How 'Headline Numbers' Shape Policy and Aspiration', Hilary Steedman, article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 2, October 2011

Related Links
Hilary Steedman webpage

New Statesman
Fragmentation or integration

Comment: Econometric studies at the LSE and the University of Bristol appear to demonstrate that hospital based competition has improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals that are subject to greater competition. The price of competition
By Carol Propper
Piece in The New Statesman’s supplement titled ‘Competition in a New Society: National Health’ The government’s resolve will have been buoyed by recent research by the LSE and the University of Bristol. These econometric studies appear to demonstrate that the hospitalbased competition introduced by the previous government (the patient choice initiative) improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals subject to greater competition. While the validity of this evidence has been contested by other academics, it has been cited by David Cameron to support a more hawkish competition policy

This article appreared in the New Statesmen on 9 December 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Management in Healthcare: Why Good Practice Really Matters’ Report from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, October 2010
‘Management practices in the NHS’ CentrePiece 14 (3), Winter 2010 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/CentrePiece/browse.asp?vol=14&issue=3) pages 16-19, by Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

New Statesman
Fragmentation or integration

Comment: Econometric studies at the LSE and the University of Bristol appear to demonstrate that hospital based competition has improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals that are subject to greater competition. The price of competition
By Carol Propper
Piece in The New Statesman’s supplement titled ‘Competition in a New Society: National Health’ The government’s resolve will have been buoyed by recent research by the LSE and the University of Bristol. These econometric studies appear to demonstrate that the hospitalbased competition introduced by the previous government (the patient choice initiative) improved clinical quality more rapidly in hospitals subject to greater competition. While the validity of this evidence has been contested by other academics, it has been cited by David Cameron to support a more hawkish competition policy

This article appreared in the New Statesmen on 9 December 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Management in Healthcare: Why Good Practice Really Matters’ Report from McKinsey & Company and the Centre for Economic Performance, October 2010
‘Management practices in the NHS’ CentrePiece 14 (3), Winter 2010 http://cep.lse.ac.uk/CentrePiece/browse.asp?vol=14&issue=3) pages 16-19, by Nick Bloom, Carol Propper, Stephan Seiler and John Van Reenen

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

DCSF.gov.uk
Michael Gove speaks to the Schools Network

Speech given by Michael Gove on December 1, 2011 in Birmingham
A few months ago, academics at the London School of Economics published a landmark assessment of the academies programme. They found three things. First, that 'Academy conversion generates... a significant improvement in pupil performance.' Second, that this improvement is not the result of academies scooping up middle-class pupils from nearby schools: the fact that more middle-class parents want to send their children to their local academy is a consequence of the school's success, not a cause. And thirdly, beyond raising standards for their own pupils, academies also tend to raise pupil performance in neighbouring schools.

This article appeared on the UK Department of Education website on Friday December 2, 2011
Link to article.

Related publications
"Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England Education" Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Times Higher Education
Postgraduate premium shows significant rise

In a discussion paper for the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Machin, the centre's research director, and Joanne Lindley, senior lecturer in economics at the University of Surrey, report that the differential between the average wage earned by UK workers with a postgraduate degree and those with an undergraduate degree rose from 6 per cent in 1996 to 13 per cent in 2009.

This article appeared in The Times Higher Education on November 3, 2011
Link to article

Related Publications
The Boom in Postgraduate Education and its Impact on Wage Inequality, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 2, Autumn 2011

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Wall Street Journal - 'Week in Ideas' blog
Criminology: home field disadvantage

As police keep order at London soccer matches, property crime in the same borough rises, new research finds, suggesting that criminals take advantage of the distraction. The study looked at fan attendance at games by nine London teams, from 1994 to 1997, plus hourly crime statistics over the same period, in the city's 32 boroughs. For every 10,000 fans above the average attendance of an away match, property crime in a borough fell 3%, suggesting some criminals left the borough to watch the game. But property crime rose 4% for every 10,000 extra people attending a home game.

This article appeared in Wall Street Journal 'Week in Ideas' blog link to article

Related publications
'Football Matches: the Effect on Crime' Olivier Marie. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 2, Autumn 2011.
"Police and Thieves in the Stadium: Measuring the (Multiple) Effects of Football Matches on Crime," Olivier Marie, London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1012, October 2010.

Related links
Olivier Marie webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

ISC Daily News Summary
University students increasingly seeking second degrees to compete for top jobs

One degree is no longer enough to secure the best-paid jobs, according to research. Growing numbers of university students are staying on after their bachelors’ degrees to complete postgraduate masters and doctorate courses, said the study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Employers are increasingly seeking more highly qualified staff and typically pay workers with postgraduate courses 13 per cent more than those with first degrees only. Workers with degrees have traditionally been paid better than those without, but the research from Prof Stephen Machin of University College London and Joanne Lindley from the University of Surrey found a significant gap opening between employees with one degree and those with higher qualifications.

This article appeared in ISC Daily News Summary on 25 October 2011 link to article

Related publications

The Boom in Postgraduate Education and its impact on Wage Inequality’, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 2, Autumn 2011

Related links

Stephen Machin webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


CEE Visitor
Hanna Virtanen

Hanna is visiting CEP from Aalto University School of Economics in Finland. She is visiting the Education Programme from September 2011 until June 2012 and will be working on a project about the effects of the supply of upper secondary education on schooling choices and educational outcomes in Finland.

MercadoContinuo
El FMI cree que puede haber una recesión inminente

"Europa vive una encrucijada histórica. Hemos llegado al límite de lo que se podía hacer sin cambios sustanciales. Mientras, llegan muy malas noticias de Grecia e Italia, que parece un país sin rumbo", asegura Luis Garicano, de la London School of Economics.

This article appeared in MercadoContinuo on 6 September 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

CEE Visitor
Mathilde Gaini

Mathilde is a Visitor to the Education Programme from September until March 2012. Mathilde completed her Masters in Economics at the Paris School of Economics and worked as an economist at the French National Institute of Statistics and Economic Studies. She is affiliated to the Paris School of Economics and CREST. Her research interests include the economics of education, policy evaluation and labour economics.

Sky News
Jeff Randall Live

Christopher Pissarides comments on tax avoidance in the Greek economy.

This interview was broadcast on Sky News on 5 September 2011 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

SERC Visitor
Dr Tuukka Saarimaa

Tuukka works as a senior researcher at the Government Institute for Economic Research (VATT) in Finland and is visiting the Spatial Economics Research Centre from September until December 2011. His main research interests are in housing and urban economics, local public finance and applied microeconometrics.

Financial Times
Education: Lesson in progress

The last Labour government set up 203 academies, most of them failing schools that were closed down and reopened. They had fewer regulatory requirements than conventional schools. They are not required to follow national pay scales for teachers and have greater latitude over the curriculum. Crucially, alongside the extra freedoms, Labour also gave most of them new leadership as part of a push to turn them round. The improvements overall were remarkable. A paper published in April by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit both at the London School of Economics, reported “significant improvement in pupil performance”

This article appeared in the Finanical Times on 1 September 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Wall Street Pit.com
A fresh surge in uncertainty

The potentially explosive combination of Eurozone debt contagion, vulnerable banking systems, and European and American political paralysis has pushed stock-market volatility to levels nearly as bad as the days following the 11 September 2001 terrorist attacks. Nobody knows what happens next. This column reviews research on 16 previous shocks and concludes that today’s uncertainty shock will create a short, sharp contraction in late 2011 of about 1% with a rebound coming in spring 2012.

This article appeared in 9 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Markets turmoil and US downgrade: global reaction

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone included in roundup of reactions from analysts and commentators from around the world to threat of a global economic crisis.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 8 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Markets turmoil and US downgrade: global reaction

Simon Johnson and Peter Boone included in roundup of reactions from analysts and commentators from around the world to threat of a global economic crisis.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 8 August 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Boone webpage
Effective Intervention Programme webpage

BBC TV
News at 9pm

Ethan Ilzetzki appeared on the evening news, talking about the vote on the US debt ceiling.

This interview was broadcast on the BBC News on August 2, 2011
[No link available]

Related Links
Ethan Ilzetzki webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Ethan Ilzetzki CEP publications webpage

L'Occidentale
La riforma dell'istruzione di Cameron: si all'efficienza no ai privilege

Una ricerca del Centre for the Economics of Education della London School of Economics ha dimostrato che le Accademie non solo innalzano gli standard dei loro studenti, ma la loro stessa esistenza ha un effetto positivo sulle scuole limitrofe.

This article appeared in L’Occidentale on 18 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’ Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Atlantic
'The Pursuit of Happiness': How Do Communities Make Us Happy?

Some scholars see the study of happiness as a branch of economics, or at least a critical examination of traditional macroeconomics. It is way beyond the scope of this blog post to discuss the academic aspects, but among the works that discuss but among the works that discuss it in detail are Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, by noted British economist Lord Richard Layard

This article appeared in The Atlantic on 29 July 2011 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2005 details

The Sunday Telegraph
Competition, not enforced equality, is the way to drive up standards in schools

This was demonstrated in a recent piece of research carried out by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit at the Centre for the Economics of Education at the LSE. After studying all the secondary schools that converted to academies under the last government, as well as their neighbouring schools, they reached the following conclusion
Our results suggest that moving to a more autonomous school structure through academy conversion generates a … significant improvement in pupil performance and … significant improvements in the performance of pupils enrolled in neighbouring schools.

This article appeared in the Telegraph on 26 June 2011 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Don't rubbish my research. Competition really does improve the NHS

Separate research by economists Bloom, Propper, Seiler and Van Reenen at Stanford, Imperial and the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found competition led to improvements in hospital management which resulted in lower death rates, higher patient satisfaction and efficiency gains.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 24 June 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘In brief… Competition in the public sector: good for the goose, good for the gander?’, Zack Cooper, CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011 link
‘Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS’, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010 link

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Further information on health economics and NHS policy link
Summary of research papers on NHS reform link

The Guardian
Don't rubbish my research. Competition really does improve the NHS

Separate research by economists Bloom, Propper, Seiler and Van Reenen at Stanford, Imperial and the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found competition led to improvements in hospital management which resulted in lower death rates, higher patient satisfaction and efficiency gains.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 24 June 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘In brief… Competition in the public sector: good for the goose, good for the gander?’, Zack Cooper, CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 1, Summer 2011 link
‘Does Hospital Competition Improve Efficiency? An Analysis of the Recent Market-Based Reforms to the English NHS’, Zack Cooper, Steve Gibbons, Simon Jones and Alistair McGuire, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.988, June 2010 link

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Further information on health economics and NHS policy link
Summary of research papers on NHS reform link

The Times
Mr Hughes reports

A Sutton Trust report found that a pupil from an independent school was 22 times more likely to attend a top university than the pupil of a state school receiving free meals and six times more likely than a state school pupil. The article looks at some of the strategies which may be implemented to redress this balance in access, which will be the topic of White Paper currently being prepared by deputy Liberal Democrat leader Simon Hughes.

This article appeared in the Times on 6 July 2011 (no link avaliable)

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’ Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Newsroom Panama
What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage

Newsroom Panama
What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage

Newsroom Panama
What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage

Newsroom Panama
What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage

Newsroom Panama
What the papers say: Germany has to remember unpaid war debt to Greece

Albrecht Ritschl a professor at the London School of Economics, has slammed Germans for their hostile attitude to the near bankrupt Mediterranean country.

This article appeared in Newsroom Panama on 23 June 2011 link to article

Related Links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Prgramme webpage

The Independent
John Rentoul: Children reap fruit of Labour's revolution

A study by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit at the London School of Economics found three things. First, that academy status tends to raise pupil performance. This had been pretty obvious from comparing the results of academies with those of their predecessor schools, but previous studies had not satisfied the test of statistical significance, partly because there have been so few academies open for long enough. Now there is no doubt. "Academy conversion generates... a significant improvement in pupil performance," the authors conclude.

This article appeared in the Independent on 29 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Telegraph
The revolution is under way – now Michael Gove must entrench it

A major report by the London School of Economics this week concluded that academies are improving standards in neighbouring schools: quality is contagious; competition drives up standards.

This article appeared in The Telegraph on 26 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Independent
If you set up a school and it becomes a good school ??

Research by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit at the LSE has found that academy status tends to raise pupil performance; it tends to raise pupil performance in neighbouring schools, and it tends to raise the socio-economic quality of the academys intake.

This article appeared in the Independent on 26 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Economist
Business and skills: Restraining training

The Confederation of British Industry says one of its member firms had to produce half a million documents to comply with regulations for its 1,500 apprentices. Hilary Steedman an expert on training at the London School of Economics, argues that it would be better simply to leave all training to be done by employers themselves.

This article appeared in The Economist on 26 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Telegraph
The report every school reformer should read

Research by the London School of Economics has revealed that academy conversion does generate a significant improvement in pupil performance, but also leads to the institutions increasing the quality of their pupil intake.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 24 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England’s Education’ Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper NO.123, April 2011


Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Il Capitale (Umano) (blog)
Il mito dell'epoca d'oro della scuola italiana

Un recente studio di Richard B. Freeman Stephen Machin e Martina Viarengo compara i sistemi scolastici di oltre 50 Paesi e la loro performance nella rilevazione TIMSS 2007 (apprendimenti in Matematica e Scienze a 13 anni) e smentisce la tesi per la quale sistemi scolastici di qualità siano inevitabilmente i più iniqui. Anzi, è vero il contrario: i paesi con i risultati migliori (punteggi più elevati) sono anche quelli che mostrano differenze più contenute tra ragazzi (dispersione dei punteggi minore).

This article appeared in Il Capitale (blog) on 23 May 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Variation in Educational Outcomes and Policies Across Countries and of Schools within Countries' Richard B. Freeman, Stephen Machin and Martina Viargengo, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.117, August 2010


Related links
Richard B. Freeman webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Martina Viarengo webpage
CEE webpage

The Guardian
Academy schools mean more competition for schools – but must dog eat dog?

The move to convert schools to academy status is underpinned by research, most recently a paper by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit of the London School of Economics, which found Labour's academies not only improved their own performance, but also raised standards in neighbouring schools.

The study found this beneficial effect happened even though high-achieving pupils started leaving neighbouring schools to attend academies.

They attribute this effect to "increased choice [and] competition and also ... the sharing of the academy school facilities and expertise with the wider community".

This article appeared in The Guardian on 23 May 2011 - link to article

Related publications:
Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, April 2011, Paper No' CEEDP0123

Academy schools: who benefits? Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, November 2010, CentrePiece Magazine : Paper No' CEPCP325

Related links:
Steve Machin's webpage
James Vernoit's webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Young Fabian Blog
Finding a cure

…number of jobless young could reach 1 million. The prognosis for the economy is bleak. Research by the London School of Economics suggests that the average ‘NEET’ (young person Not in Employment, Education or Training) costs the state £97,000 over their lifetime. More importantly, there are shocking implications...

This article appeared on the Young Fabian Blog on 3 May 2011 link to article

Related Publications
The Cost of Exclusion: Counting the cost of youth disadvantage in the UK Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Joint CEP and Princes Trust Report, April 2007.

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

This is Money
A vital force for growth

A report last year by the OECD found it is harder to climb the social ladder here than in the US, France, Italy, Germany, Spain, Canada and a clutch of Scandinavian countries. A previous study by the London School of Economics suggested social mobility had declined in the UK, and that people born in 1970 had less chance of escaping the circumstances into which they were born than in 1958.

This article appeared in This is Money on 30 April 2011 link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
A vital force for growth

The Royal Wedding provides an extraordinary tale of social mobility - Prince William, the great-great-grandson of King George V, marrying Kate Middleton (now the Duchess of Cambridge), the great-great-granddaughter of a Durham miner. While the wedding has cheered post-credit crunch Britain, the country remains overall the least socially-mobile in Europe. A previous study by the London School of Economics suggested social mobility had declined in the UK, and that people born in 1970 had less chance of escaping the circumstances into which they were born than those born in 1958.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on 29 April 2011 link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
David Willets has got his maths badly wrong on tuition fees

As Peter Dolton an education economist at Royal Holloway University of London, puts it: "Don't underestimate the chaos there'll be over the next year or two." He predicts that there will be a slump in demand for the bottom-ranking 20 or 30 institutions, which will lead to them suffering "severe financial difficulties".

This article appeared in the Guardian on 26 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Peter Dolton publications webpage

Financial Times
Britain: the fairy tale fantasy

“If the gap between success and failure is large, the middle class will fight hard to ensure their offspring do well,” says Paul Gregg from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. “They might be quite happy for a child to go off and become a potter if the price of that is not a big drop in living standards. If it is, they will do all they can to ensure their kids do not suffer downward mobility.”

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 25 April 2011 link to article

Related links
Paul Gregg webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Paul Gregg CEP publications webpage

The Tribune
Debt, deficits and income inequality

But again, things are not quite as simple as they seem. Researchers at the London School of Economics have compared social mobility in eight advanced countries, and their data shows that the more equal countries have higher social mobility. In other words, the American Dream...

This article appeared in the Tribune on 21 April 2011 link to article

Related Publications
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005


Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Paul Gregg webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Alissa Goodman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

BBC Radio 4
The search for growth

John Van Reenen appeared on the programme in which the BBC's Economics Editor, Stephanie Flanders, concludes her search for growth in Britain's economy.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio 4 on 22 March 2011 link

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

This is Surrey Today
‘Budget cuts will increase schools gap' say Mole Valley headteachers

LEVEL PLAYING FIELD? Head teachers have warned Government cuts could widen the gap between private and state schools Dr Jo Blanden a University of Surrey expert on social mobility, agreed the cuts could lead to "more divisions" and fewer opportunities for state school pupils.

This article appeared in This is Surrey Today on 21 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Jo Blanden publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

El Pais
Moody's contra el Banco de España

Pero en este pulso los economistas consultados disparan contra Moody's: para Luis Garicano de la London School of Economics, "la arrogante pereza que supone no esperar a que el saque sus números (no sea que haya que estudiarse los datos antes de opinar) es incomprensible en...

This article appeared in El Pais on 20 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

El Pais
Moody's contra el Banco de España

Pero en este pulso los economistas consultados disparan contra Moody's: para Luis Garicano de la London School of Economics, "la arrogante pereza que supone no esperar a que el saque sus números (no sea que haya que estudiarse los datos antes de opinar) es incomprensible en...

This article appeared in El Pais on 20 March 2011 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

BBC News
Mind the pay gap

The reasons for Britain's income inequality over recent decades has been set out in a new academic paper by Stephen Machin director of the Centre for Economic Performance and a member of the Low Pay Commission.

This article appeared on the BBC News website on 16 March 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘In brief: Economic inequality in the UK’, CentrePiece Volume 14, Issue 3, Winter 2009/2010 link

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Guardian
China looks for inner richness

Although China has become the world's second-largest economy, its domestic markets need reform for its citizens' sake.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 February 2011 link to article

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Guardian
Government to create extra 100,000 apprenticeships

Apprenticeships and vocational training schemes are increasingly being promoted by business leaders and politicians from all sides as a cost-effective way to address skills shortages in several UK industry sectors. Despite this, a recent report by the Centre for Economic Performance found there are only 11 apprenticeships for every 1,000 workers in the UK. Historically such schemes have been beset by high dropout rates, with low rates of pay among the main contributing factors.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 7 February 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘The State of Apprenticeship in 2010’. A CEP Special Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman.
download report


Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Hilary Steedman publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Manchester Wired
Why is Social Mobility Still Such a Problem?

Getting the best start in life for people who come from a poor background has always been a difficult issue for politicians. This week a government-commissioned report identified a cycle of “dysfunction and under-achievement” – and the need to tackle it.... According to 2005 research from the London School of Economics there was an overall decline in social mobility in the UK between 1958-1970. The people who moved forward during this period were from the middle classes, the researchers concluded.

This article appeared in Manchester Wired on 22 January 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Increasing University Income from home and overseas students: what impact for social mobility’, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, CEP Report for Sutton Trust, September 2010 link
‘Recent trends in intergenerational mobility: will the downward trend continue?’ Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece vol 13(2), Autumn 2008.
Report for the Sutton Trust Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005
Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005


Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Progress Magazine
Social mobility: where next?

Liz Kendall shares her thoughts in a speech to last night's De Montfort Distinguished Lecture Series on social mobility in Britain and how to ensure it can be boosted in difficult times. "Before I go on to talk about the future, how has social mobility changed in Britain’s recent past? During the last Parliament, the LSE’s Centre for Economic Performance published research which found that children born to poor families in Britain are less likely to break free from their backgrounds and fulfil their potential than in the past."

This article was published in Progress magazine on 21 January 2011 link to article

Related publications
‘Increasing University Income from home and overseas students: what impact for social mobility’ Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, CEP Report for Sutton Trust, September 2010
Report for the Sutton Trust: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage