London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2012


BBC TV - Newsnight
Can the gap between living costs and wages be fixed?

A report from the Resolution Foundation says people on low to middle incomes face the prospect of being poorer in 2020 than they are now. In the past, benign employers raised pay to keep pace with the cost of living, and if they did not, trade unions organised strikes to meet the need. But now things are different - the promise of Western capitalism, of ever rising rates of pay, has turned out to be false.

This article appeared on the BBC TV Newsnight programme on October 31, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
What a drag: the chilling impact of unemployment on real wages, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Resolution Foundation Paper, September 2012

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

BBC TV - Newsnight
Can the gap between living costs and wages be fixed?

A report from the Resolution Foundation says people on low to middle incomes face the prospect of being poorer in 2020 than they are now. In the past, benign employers raised pay to keep pace with the cost of living, and if they did not, trade unions organised strikes to meet the need. But now things are different - the promise of Western capitalism, of ever rising rates of pay, has turned out to be false.

This article appeared on the BBC TV Newsnight programme on October 31, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
What a drag: the chilling impact of unemployment on real wages, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Resolution Foundation Paper, September 2012

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Sunday Times
Britain on low rung of social mobility ladder

Dominic Lawson misses the most important point that arose from the research the Sutton Trust commissioned the London School of Economics (LSE) to undertake in 2005 on social mobility ("It's a myth that there is less social mobility", Comment, last week.) The significant issue the LSE study identified was that social mobility is lower in Britain than in most other developed countries.

This comment was published in The Sunday Times on October 28, 2012
Link to a copy of the article here.

Related publications
Sutton Trust: Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
A chain reaction that would fix failing schools

So what can this Government do about it? The first piece of good news is that the academy programme is working. According to both the National Audit Office and the London School of Economics, failing schools that have been turned into academies under new sponsors are performing better than those that did not.

This article was published in the Daily Telegraph on Wednesday 17 October, 2012
Link to article here

Related publications
'Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education', by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, CEE Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage

Vox
Apprenticeship policy in England: Increasing skills versus boosting young people's job prospects

In her article, Hilary Steedman writes:
As in every downturn, youth unemployment is a serious concern. This column looks at apprenticeship policy in England. It argues that England is a long way off the apprentice numbers of countries like Germany but with a clear strategy, some nudging, and flexibility, England could realistically aim for the prize that has so far eluded it – higher skills and high youth participation in the workforce.

The article was published by Vox on October 6, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP Publications webpage

Vox
Apprenticeship policy in England: Increasing skills versus boosting young people's job prospects

In her article, Hilary Steedman writes:
As in every downturn, youth unemployment is a serious concern. This column looks at apprenticeship policy in England. It argues that England is a long way off the apprentice numbers of countries like Germany but with a clear strategy, some nudging, and flexibility, England could realistically aim for the prize that has so far eluded it – higher skills and high youth participation in the workforce.

The article was published by Vox on October 6, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP Publications webpage

The Raconteur
Yes-no debate over the best business model

DEBATE Leading experts Joachim Schwass, professor of family business at IMD and director of the IMD Global Family Business Center, and John Van Reenen, professor of economics at the London School of Economics and director of the Centre of Economic Performance, debate the value of family business.

This article was published by The Raconteur on October 4, 2012
All articles in The Raconteur originally published in The Times or The Sunday Times
Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
John Van Reenen CEP publications webpage

Huffington Post
Grand illusion: mobility, inequality, and the American Dream

Studies of social mobility as far back as the 1950s and 1960s showed that rates of movement in the United States were generally comparable to other developed countries. This finding itself challenged the longstanding image of America as exceptionally open, but it is a far cry from today, when the United States rates at or near the bottom in comparative studies of social mobility. To take just two examples, a study by Jo Blanden and colleagues at the London School of Economics found that a father's income was a better predictor of a son's income in the United States than in seven other countries, including Germany, Canada, and the United Kingdom.

This article was published in the Huffington Post on October 2, 2012

Related publications

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Paul Gregg webpage


Guardian
Public sector pay stays neck and neck with private sector for the long race

Over a whole career, men in the public sector will earn the same as their commercial peers - and women will do better.

It is essential that any proposed reforms of the total remuneration package available to current and future public sector employees are evaluated carefully...

Related publications
Are public sector employees overcompensated? by Alexander Danzer, Peter Dolton. Article in CentrePieceVolume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
This article summarises 'Total Reward and Pensions in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors' by Alexander Danzer and Peter Dolton, Labour Economics 19(4): 584-594, August 2012

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Guardian
Public sector pay stays neck and neck with private sector for the long race

Over a whole career, men in the public sector will earn the same as their commercial peers - and women will do better.

It is essential that any proposed reforms of the total remuneration package available to current and future public sector employees are evaluated carefully...

Related publications
Are public sector employees overcompensated? by Alexander Danzer, Peter Dolton. Article in CentrePieceVolume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
This article summarises 'Total Reward and Pensions in the UK in the Public and Private Sectors' by Alexander Danzer and Peter Dolton, Labour Economics 19(4): 584-594, August 2012

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Daily Telegraph
Forget private fees, live near state schools

Parents could save around 26,000 by avoiding independent schools in favour of state primaries ranked among the top 10 per cent, researchers from the London School of Economics claim.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on September 20, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices by Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
How happy is local government?

With the release in recent years of books such as Richard Layard's Happiness and The Spirit Level by Richard Wilkinson and Kate Pickett, we should have seen a fundamental shift in how mainstream politics and government views happiness metrics.

This article was published in the Guardian on September 14, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, 2nd Edition
Richard Layard, Penguin, 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness Research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Washington Post
France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

Washington Post
France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

Washington Post
France said to press Spain to seek aid over German concerns

"The situation in Spain is not improving, there is really absolutely no benefit in waiting", Nobel laureate Christopher Pissarides, an economics professor at the London School of Economics, said in an interview with Bloomberg Television yesterday. "There isn't anything in the pipeline that will ease the situation".

The article was published in the Washington Post on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage
Christopher Pissarides CEP publications webpage

The Business
A tangible Olympic economic boost?

Several of our essayists are likewise sceptical about the existence of clear economic and business benefits to Olympic host cities and countries. Max Nathan, research fellow with the Spatial Economics Research Centre, London School of Economics, writes that hoped-for impacts from job creation, transport improvement and inducements to healthier living usually turn out to be small. He also warns that it will take years for any lasting benefits to become clear.

This article was published in The Business on September 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Max Nathan webpage
SERC website

FinChannel
Low-cost information campaign promotes positive attitudes to university

A 'light-touch' information campaign about the value and affordability of going to university can have a big positive effect on the attitudes of pre-GCSE school students towards staying in education. That is the central finding of new research by Professor Sandra McNally and colleagues at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) which has surveyed more than 12,000 students aged between 14 and 15 in 54 London secondary schools.

This article appeared in FinChannel on 25 August 2012 link to article

Related publications
Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign, Martin McGuigan, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.139, August 2012 link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

The Guardian
Bad advice turns poor students off university

Professor Sandra McNally says myths surrounding tuition fees need to be debunked before inequalities in university access worsen.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 25 August 2012 link to article

Related publications
Student Awareness of Costs and Benefits of Educational Decisions: Effects of an Information Campaign, Martin McGuigan, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.139, August 2012 link to article

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website

CEP Press Release
School students' views on going to university

Low-cost information campaign promotes positive attitudes
New research by Professor Sandra McNally, Gill Wyness and Martin McGuigan at the Centre for Economic Performance reveals substantial gaps in school students' knowledge of very basic facts about the costs and benefits of staying in education. What's more, the trebling of university fees announced in late 2010 - and the negative media coverage around at that time about the potential impact - significantly increased students' perceptions that going to university is 'too expensive'.

A summary of the research can be read in the press release [PDF]

Download the full discussion paper

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Family Times New Zealand
Let's not hurry children through childhood

Ironically, when parents release the pressure and focus on developing children's general wellbeing, they perform better in the long run. The London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance followed the fortunes of all babies born in the first week of April 1970 in Britain. There was clear evidence that children with a higher self-esteem at the age of 10 got as much kick to their earning power as those with higher math, reading and other academic abilities. They had less chance of being unemployed later in life and if they were, they would soon be back in the workforce.

This article appeared in Family Times New Zealand on 4 August 2012 link to article

Related publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.517, January 2002
Changes in intergenerational mobility in Britain J. Blanden, A. Goodman, P. Gregg and S. Machin. In M. Corak (ed.), Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, November 2004, Cambridge University Press.

Related Links
Steve Machin website
Jo Blanden website
Education and Skills website

FSN
US better at exploiting software than UK

US multinational firms are on average 8.5 per cent more productive than UK domestic-owned firms, and almost all of this difference is due to the higher productivity impact of their use of IT. This was one of the stand-out comments in the recent Technology Insights 2012 report from e-skills, the sector skills body for business and IT, a finding based on research from both the London School of Economics and the UK Office for National Statistics.

This article was published in FSN on Thursday 26 July, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
It ain't what you do it's the way that you do I.T. Testing explanations of productivity growth using US affiliates, Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, EDS Discussion Paper No.2, July 2005
It Ain't what You Do, It's the Way that You Do IT, Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
See also Nick Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen (2005), It Ain't What You Do, It's the Way that You Do I.T.:Testing Explanations of Productivity Growth using US Affiliates, Office for National Statistics Report

Related links
Nick Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Spain edges closer to disaster as the euro crisis apreads

Euro doomed, say experts
The euro has broken down and faces collapse with 'incalculable economic losses and human suffering', according to an extraordinary warning from a group of leading economists. The experts include two members of Germany's Council of Economic Experts and leading euro specialists at the London School of Economics [Luis Garicano and Guillermo de la Dehesa], all of whom support the single currency.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on Wednesday 25 July, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
My first free school has passed the test - now for the next one

Research carried out at the LSE recently suggests that increased competition really does raise standards. Stephen Machin and James Vernoit looked at the academies opened under Labour and found that their impact on the neighbouring schools had been positive, with exam results improving.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 18 June 2012 link to article

Related publications
Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 123, April 2011
Academy schools: who benefits? Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Paper No. 11, July 2010


Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

The Sunday Times
Don't get mad, get help

A report by the mental-health policy group at the London School of Economics (LSE) estimates that these disorders now account for nearly half of all ill health suffered by people in Britain. But does the deluge of celebrity sufferers mean that while awareness is raised, there is a risk that mentalhealth problems become so commonplace, we are being conditioned into thinking they are the norm?

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on the 8 July 2012 link to article

Related publications
How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS A report by The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published 18 June 2012
Download the report here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Times
Ignoring mental illness is pure discrimination

Comment: Professor Lord Layard, at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, discussing an LSE report published today, says that "Mental illness is the great hidden problem in our society. But cost-effective treatments exist. The tragedy is that so many people cannot get them, and less than a third of those who need help are in any form of treatment."

The article appeared in The Times on June 18, 2012
Link to a copy of the article

Related publications
'How Mental Illness Loses Out in the NHS'. A report by the Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy Group. Published June 18, 2012.
Details
Download the report here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Mental Health Policy Group webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


See also
The Times
NHS 'failing to deal with big rise in mentally ill'
[No link available]

The Guardian
Are tuition fees really to blame for a drop in student numbers?

Article by Gill Wyness
New figures from UCAS show that 46,413 fewer English students have applied to go to university in September 2012 than had applied by this time last year. So far this year, student demand in England has dropped by 10 per cent in total. It seems enough to conclude that tuition fees have had a severe impact on university anticipation. However, there are a few problems with drawing this conclusion.

Article appeared in the Guardian on June 13, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage

Policy Review TV
The impact of non-native English speakers on classmates

In England, 12 per cent of primary school children do not speak English as a first language, Dr Sandra McNally told the Can't Speak, Can't Learn conference this week. The event looked at the impact of non-native speakers on their classmates. The number of those whose mother-tongue is not English has increased by one-third from 2003 to 2009. Dr Sandra McNally, Director of Education and Skills, Centre for Economic Performance, The London School of Economics and Political Science, presented research findings in a talk entitled: Pupil Performance on the Changing Geography of Ethnic Minority Pupils in Secondary Schools.

The interview was broadcast on Policy Review TV on May 24, 2012
Link to interview here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

TVP - Telewizja Polska Wspolpracownik (Polish National TV Station)
Polania 24

Prof Sandra McNally interviewed, speaking about study she co-authored that suggests that far from holding native speakers back, that non-native English speakers may actually be spurring their colleagues on to greater academic achievements.

The interview was broadcast on VP. Telewizja Polska Wspolpracownik (Polish National TV Station) on May 23, 2012
No link available.

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally, Shqiponja Telhaj, May 2012. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Influx of Polish children into schools has helped improve British pupils' grades

The proportion of non-native pupils in primary schools in England has increased by a third to around 12% over the past 10 years - leading to fears they would take up too much of teachers' time. But research by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics shows they actually appear to have a positive effect on English children. Prof Sandra McNally, who led the research, looked at data from 2005 to 2009 taken from the National Pupil database, a census of all children in English schools.

This article appeared in The Daily Mail on May 22, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Polish children boosting standards among English pupils, study suggests

The influx of Polish children into schools in the UK has helped lift their British-born classmates' grades despite language difficulties, an economic study suggests. The findings come in a study on the impact of non-native speakers on the results of children in English primary schools published by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) today. Researchers led by Prof Sandra McNally, a professor of economics at Surrey University, who is also director of the CEP's research programme on education, looked at data from the English schools census for the years 2005 to 2009.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on May 22, 2012
Link to article

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Washington Post
England Student Debt Unprecedented as Government Shifts Funding

U.S. education debt can't be discharged through bankruptcy and almost 2 million Americans with student debt are over 60, according to the New York Federal Reserve. About $85 billion in student debt was delinquent in the third quarter of 2011. In March, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said U.S. student-loan debt had reached $1 trillion, based on preliminary findings. "The American system is brutal" said Tim Leunig who teaches economic history at the London School of Economics.

This article appeared in the The Washington Post on 23 April 2012 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

The Guardian
Academies: old research is being wrongly used to validate them

Article by Stephen Machin
The coalition's academy programme is not the same as Labour's, so why is our old research being used to support them, asks Stephen Machin.
University researchers are under increasing pressure to make their findings policy-relevant. At the same time, research evidence is increasingly quoted either to support or subvert government policies across a wide range of areas and this has featured heavily in policy debates about education. On the whole, this is a good thing, especially for evaluating the success or otherwise of initiatives like Sure Start, the education maintenance allowance and the literacy hour. One education policy that has been discussed extensively is the introduction of academy schools. This is an initiative on which James Vernoit and I published some research in late 2010, not long after the coalition government came to power and the new education secretary, Michael Gove, started pushing for a rapid expansion of the academies programme.

This article appeared in The Guardian on 9 April 2012 link to article

Related publications
Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 123, April 2011
Academy schools: who benefits? Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Paper No. 11, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

LSE blog British politics and policy at LSE
The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in the classroom is not damaging for the educational outcomes of native English speakers

The number of primary school pupils in England who do not speak English as a first language has been growing in recent years. Sandra McNally examines whether this is damaging the educational outcomes of native English speakers, concluding that this should not in fact be a cause for concern.

This article appeared in the LSE blog on 23 March 2012 link to article

Related publications
Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance? by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

All Voices
Study dispels myth that immigrants have bad effect on standards of primary schools in UK

Immigrants coming to the UK don't have a bad effect on the standards of British primary schools. This has been proved by findings of a latest research undertaken by London School of Economics. The research shows that immigrants who are non-native English speakers do not, in any way, lower the educational standards of British primary schools.

This article appeared in All Voices on 20 March 2012 link to article

Canada updates (Canadian Immigration site)
Immigrants don’t affect UK school standards
United Kingdom, 19th March: Contrary to common claims, immigrants from non-native English speaking nations don't have any significant impact on British school standards. Increasing percentage of non-native English speakers in British primary schools is not affecting educational performance levels of native English speakers in any way, states one of the authors of the research, Sandra McNally link to article

See also
Related publications
Non-Native Speakers Of English In The Classroom: What Are The Effects On Pupil Performance? Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Immigrants have little effect on school standards

A study by the London School of Economics examining the impact of east European immigrants has concluded there is no reason to be worried about the increase in the number of non-native speakers of English in primary schools. According to the researchers, based at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, the proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools increased by a third to about 12 per cent over the past 10 years.

This article appeared in The Financial Times on 16 March 2012 link to article

Related publications
Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance? by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

This is Money
Reed Elsevier in U-turn as boycott bites

Leunig publicly criticised the group's reaction to the boycott. Leunig, a reader in economic history at the London School of Economics, had lashed out after Reed Elsevier chief executive Erik Engstrom described the objections of his company's critics as being based on 'misunderstandings'. Leunig hit back, saying: 'He should be honest and state that in many cases his journals have an element of monopoly power.'

This article appeared in This is Money on 11 March 2012 link to article

Related links
Tim Leunig webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

International Herald Tribune
For youths in Britain, few jobs and rising anger

Youngsters in Britain are becoming increasingly desperate, as youth unemployment has soared to 22.3 per cent. Increases in apprenticeships are proposed as one possible solution. LSE economist, Hilary Steedman comments.

This article was published in the International Herald Tribune (The New York Times) on February 15, 2012 Link to article

Also in
Thursday 16 February
Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
Britain's youth face sense of down and out

Related publications
Apprenticeship Policy in England: Increasing Skills versus Boosting Young People's Job Prospects, Hilary Steedman, Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis, December 2011
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010. International Comparisons: Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. Centre for Economic Performance Special Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman, September 2010

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
Should UK universities consider modularised courses?

Last week, in a blog post that proved deeply divisive, LSE education policy researcher, Gill Wyness suggested that making it easier for university students to switch degrees would be of benefit to both students and the sector. The idea of modularised courses in the UK was first put forward on the network by professor Cary Cooper who predicted that the rising costs of higher education would mandate a discussion about modularised courses in the UK. The Guardian inspired to set an opinion poll.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 8 February 2012 link to article

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage

The Economist
Can we ever trust instinct?

Another hotly debated issue that arises indirectly from psychological research is the use of measures of well-being to help guide policy. In the UK the intellectual leader of the movement is my friend Richard Layard and he and I don’t quite agree on the direction this should take. He is much more of an optimist than I am, and he would favour measures that would improve the happiness of the population, whereas I am more of a pessimist and believe that it should be the objective of policy to reduce suffering, which is not the same thing.

This article appeared in The Economist on 5 February 2012 link to article

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science Richard Layard Penguin books, 2005
Measuring Subjective Wellbeing for Public Policy Paul Dolan, Richard Layard, and Robert Metcalfe (2011), Office of National Statistics, February

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness Research webpage

The House Magazine
Coalition review

Section by Hilary Steedman invited to comment on the progress the coalition government has made with its election pledge regarding apprenticeships.

This article appeared in House Magazine on 2 February 2012 (no link avaliable)

Related publications
Apprenticeship Policy in England: Increasing Skills versus Boosting Young People's Job Prospects', Hilary Steedman, CEP Policy Analysis PA013, November 2011 link
'Young People Without Qualifications: How 'Headline Numbers' Shape Policy and Aspiration', Hilary Steedman, article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 2, October 2011 link

Related Links
Hilary Steedman webpage

The Times Online
Davos Day 3: Europe not out of the woods yet

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, will discuss the changes wrought by technology upon the global economy with Professor Christopher Pissarides of the LSE.

This article appeared on the Times Online on 2 February 2012 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

The Times Online
Davos Day 3: Europe not out of the woods yet

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, will discuss the changes wrought by technology upon the global economy with Professor Christopher Pissarides of the LSE.

This article appeared on the Times Online on 2 February 2012 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

The Times Online
Davos Day 3: Europe not out of the woods yet

Eric Schmidt, executive chairman of Google, will discuss the changes wrought by technology upon the global economy with Professor Christopher Pissarides of the LSE.

This article appeared on the Times Online on 2 February 2012 (no link avaliable)

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

The Guardian
Give students the right to switch university

The 'stick with it or quit' model can't continue, allowing transfers will benefit both students and universities, says Gill Wyness.

This article appeared in The Guardian on February 1, 2012
Link to article

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP Publications webpage

Times Higher Education
Impact of fees hike to be monitored by independent commission

An independent commission has been set up to see if higher tuition fees are deterring poorer students from applying to university. Chaired by former Observer editor Will Hutton, principal of Hertford College, Oxford, the commission will also include Sutton Trust chairman Peter Lampl, Stephen Machin professor of economics at University College London, and Times journalist Libby Purves, who presents the BBC Radio 4 education programme The Learning Curve.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education on 27 January 2012 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Press Association
Impact of fees increase monitored

An independent commission has been established to monitor the impact of increased university fees in England over the next three years, it has been announced. The four members of the panel at present are: Mr Hutton, principal of Hertford College, Oxford University, and executive vice-chair of the Work Foundation; Stephen Machin Professor of Economics at University College London and research director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics; Libby Purves, writer, radio broadcaster and Times chief theatre critic; and Sir Peter Lampl, chairman of the Sutton Trust and the Education Endowment Foundation.

This article appeared in the Press Association on 27 January 2012 link to article

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


CEE Visitor
Marco Bertoni

Marco is a visitor from the University of Padova, Italy, where he is a PhD student under the supervision of professor G. Brunello. His research interests cover labour economics, the economics of education and programme evaluation. He is a visitor to the CEP Education Programme.

Times Education Supplement
Painting over cracks is not enough for apprentices

In countries where apprenticeships are far more popular with employers than in England, participants are expected to carry out nine times the amount of training: a minimum of 900 hours compared to just 100 in this country. That is one of the headline figures of a new policy analysis that lays bare the "dysfunctional funding and delivery model" of apprenticeships in England. Written by Hilary Steedman senior research fellow at the London School of Economics, it returns to the original announcement of modern apprenticeships in 1993 and notes that the then Conservative government's pledge of 40,000 level 3 apprenticeship qualifications each year has not been met in 18 years.

This article appeared in the Times Education Supplement on 6 January 2012 link to article

Related publications
Apprenticeship Policy in England: Increasing Skills versus Boosting Young People’s Job Prospects Centre for Economic Performance Policy Analysis by Hilary Steedman, published December 2011 link to publication

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

DCSF.gov.uk
Michael Gove speech on academies

In a speech given yesterday (4 January 2012) at Haberdashers' Aske's Hatcham College, Michael Gove cited "a landmark assessment" of the Academy Schools scheme by Steve Machin and James Vernoit.

This article appeared on the DCSF.gov.uk on 5 January 2012 link to article

See also
Conservative Party
Michael Gove: Who are the ideologues now? link to article

Related publications
"Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education" Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123 April 2011
"Academy Schools: Who Benefits?" Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
"A Note on Academy School Policy" Centre for Economic Performance Policy Briefing, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage