London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2013


Times Higher Education
Out of the blue, into the red?

In a recent book, Browne and Beyond, Gill Wyness, a researcher at the London School of Economics, speculates that removing the cap would result in an escalation of what we have already seen among the mini-league of elite institutions under AAB/ABB. Students would ''trade up'' as their grades permit, with each rank of institutions taking students from the rank below, she writes. This would continue until excess demand was absorbed.

This article was published by the Times Higher Education on December 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Pay rises are making a comeback - here's how we make sure they stay

Greedy capitalists are sometimes also blamed for falling wages. That is nonsense. In many other countries capital has grabbed a greater share of the economic pie in recent years. However, this has not happened in the UK, a vitally important but almost entirely overlooked fact. Over the past quarter of a century, the share of GDP going to employees in wages, salaries, pension contributions, benefits and social costs has remained roughly the same. It has averaged 54pc of GDP and varied from 51pc in 1996 to 56pc in 1991. When including the self-employed, the share has also remained constant, averaging 59pc (in a 57pc to 61pc range). This is extremely important data, first revealed in a ground-breaking paper by João Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics.

The article was published in the Daily Telegraph on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'Decoupling of Wage Growth and Productivity Growth? Myth and Reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013

Related links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

BBC (web)
Ego-boosts 'drive up boys' results'

Boys are much more likely than girls to be influenced by where they stand in ability in school, research suggests. A study from the London School of Economics indicates being seen as a high flyer in primary school, regardless of actual ability, can be a strong motivator for boys' performance in secondary school. ''Boys were four times more affected by being top of the class than girls.'' The study was based on results of more than two million pupils in England. The research, from Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, examined how much pupils might be affected by comparisons with others in primary school and how these perceptions might become a factor in raising or lowering confidence.

This article was published online by BBC News on December 10, 2013
Link to article here

See also
UK Wired News
Boys 'improve in school from feeling top of class'

Related publications
In brief...Top of the class, Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Nottingham Post
Best schools are good for property prices

The link between popular locations for housing and the best schools has long been acknowledged...But does this increase in desirability lead to an increase in house prices? A series of studies have been undertaken by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and, they believe that people are prepared to pay the price for a good state school.

This article was published in The Nottingham Post on November 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Big ideas - Valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17 Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Housing valuations of school performance, Sandra Black and Stephen Machin, in Handbook of the Economics of Education, Volume 3 edited by Eric Hanushek, Stephen Machin and Ludger Woessmann, North Holland, 2010, pp.485-519.
Valuing English primary schools (2003) Stephen Gibbons and Stephen Machin, in Journal of Urban Economics 53: 197-210
'Valuing primary schools', Stephen Gibbons and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.15, August 2001
'Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
'Houses and schools: valuation of school quality through the housing market', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

Times Higher Education
Education policy and research are linked in online

An online network aims to bring policymakers together with academics studying higher education, potentially stimulating new research on neglected areas such as the effectiveness of access spending. The ''Economics of Higher Education'' network, which officially launched on 20 November, is being led by two London School of Economics academics, with sponsorship from Universities UK and the Economic and Social Research Council. One of the academics behind the project, Gill Wyness, research officer at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, said it was ''not always easy'' for researchers and policymakers to connect, and that better links could ''spark off ideas for research''. She argued that there was a lack of research on important areas such as the ''impact of tuition fees on participation''. Another area of weakness was research on the effectiveness of the widening access measures chosen by universities in their agreements with the Office for Fair Access, added Dr Wyness, who will work on the network with her LSE colleague Richard Murphy, a research economist at the Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published in The Times Higher Education on November 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education network webpage

The Times
Should the Church end 'pay or pray'?

For ambitious - and even atheist - parents, faith schools are still the best alternative to private schools. Is it time for a crackdown?
Faith-based academies have boomed and it is important to note that these are generally new secondary schools in more deprived areas that admit far fewer children based on faith. This is why the Bishop of Oxford was yesterday keen to emphasise that church secondaries are not socially divisive compared with the national average, although if you compare the intake of church secondaries to their local areas the figures show that they still take 13 per cent fewer children eligible for free school meals than other state schools. For primaries, the segregation is more marked. In 2011 Olmo Silva from the London School of Economics examined all 11,000 state primaries in England and found that children at church school were more likely to have English as a first language and be white and were less likely to have special educational needs or be eligible for free school meals.

This article was published in The Times on November 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?', Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.72, November 2006
In brief: Faith Primary Schools: Better Schools or Better Pupils?, Stephen Gibbons and Olmo Silva. Article in CentrePiece Volume 12, Issue 1, Summer 2007
'School Structure, School Autonomy and the Tail', Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No. 29, March 2013

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
SERC website

Businessgreen.com
Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Businessgreen.com
Sir David King calls on business leaders to embrace 'drivers for change'

Former chief scientist urges businesses to challenge impression that low carbon transition is a 'hair shirts and sandals' programme
King argued these drivers should manifest themselves through new technologies and changed behaviours. In particular, he highlighted the campaign he recently launched alongside Lord Richard Layard for a Sun Power Programme, modelled on the Apollo programme that would accelerate and co-ordinate research and development efforts to make solar power cost competitive with fossil fuels. ''The aim is to target funding at any blockage points that are stopping the solar power becoming cheaper than fossil fuels'', he explained. ''Solar is already cheaper in many off grid communities... But the question is how do we make it cheaper everywhere? One of the main blockage points is energy storage. At the moment energy storage R&D is the Cinderella of the energy industry. If we can overcome that challenge we can make solar the standard choice for energy generation.''

The article was published by Businessgreen.com on November 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

LSE Politics and Policy blog
Social mobility matters, and government can affect the mechanisms which promote it

In response to arguments that the 'social mobility problem' has been overstated and that social mobility as a policy aim is futile, Jo Blanden reviews research that her and colleagues have conducted into intergenerational mobility in the UK. She argues that there is good evidence that relative intergenerational income mobility declined over time in the UK and that governments can indeed affect the mechanisms which can promote social mobility. To do so they must take a close look at the overall shape of society.

The piece was published by LSE politics and policy blog on November 4, 2013
Link to blog here

Related publications
Blanden, J., A. Goodman, P.Gregg and S.Machin (2004) ''Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain'' in Corak, M. (ed.) Generational Income Inequality in North American and Europe, Cambridge University Press. Details.
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust, April 2005
This paper has been published as: Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, 'Educational Inequality and Intergenerational Mobility' in Stephen Machin and Anna Vignoles (eds.) What's the Good of Education? The Economics of Education in the UK, Princeton University Press, 2005. Details.

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sunday Business Post (Ireland)
Siptu proposes apprenticeship system for young people

The Department of Education is understood to have established the review group because it was concerned about a significant collapse in employer demand for apprentices, particularly in construction-related trades. Statistics reported by this newspaper in May showed a massive fall-off in the number of new apprentice registrations supplied by troubled state training agency F ¡s, which was replaced last week by Solas, a new further education and training authority. The review group, headed by Labour Court chairman Kevin Duffy, is consulting widely with training providers, trade unions and employer representatives. It is focusing on work-based learning and establishing a closer alignment of the apprenticeship system with the current needs of the labour market. The review group also includes Dr Hilary Steedman, a senior research fellow from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and Dr Tony Dundon, head of management discipline at the School of Business and Economics in NUI Galway. The group also contains representatives from industry, Ibec and Ictu.

The article was published in The Sunday Business Post on November 3, 2013
[Subscription needed to view the article]

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

Times Higher Education
Rich-poor higher education gap 'wider than in 1963'

Increasing the number of poorer students in higher education has not proved to be the ''great social leveller'' that it was expected to be in the Robbins era. That was the argument set out by Anna Vignoles, professor of education at the University of Cambridge, at a conference to mark the 50th anniversary of the Robbins report held at the London School of Economics on 22 October. Lord Robbins was head of the economics department at the LSE at the time his report was published.

The article was published in The Times Higher Education on October 31, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Anna Vignoles webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website
Anna Vignoles CEP publications webpage

Lancashire Telegraph
Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Lancashire Telegraph
Warning of mixed ability classes

TEACHING mixed ability groups could damage the confidence of pupils who believe they are in the bottom half of their class, a study suggests. Researchers from the London School of Economics claim that children who achieved high grades in primary school, then perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smart but because their previous success in class had boosted their confidence. Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt analysed test data of more than two million pupils in England and carried out a survey on the confidence of 15,000 young people.

This article was published by the Lancashire Telegraph on October 29, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

guardian.co.uk (web)
Student loans: what would Robbins do?

Article by Gill Wyness
Ever tried filling out a student loan form? A simpler system would benefit students as much as better advice, says Gill Wyness, researcher in education policy at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by guardian.co.uk online on October 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage

guardian.co.uk (web)
Student loans: what would Robbins do?

Article by Gill Wyness
Ever tried filling out a student loan form? A simpler system would benefit students as much as better advice, says Gill Wyness, researcher in education policy at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by guardian.co.uk online on October 28, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage

ILOTV
Hilary Steedman: Apprenticeships and productivity of small and medium-sized enterprises

Hilary Steedman, a Research Associate at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics talks about how apprenticeships can help small and medium-sized enterprises (SME) improve their productivity, and their importance for young employees, both women and men.

The item was first broadcast on ILOTV on October 24, 2013
Link to item here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

The Daily Telegraph
How it pays to be in the catchment area

...children to expensive public schools in the area, such as New Hall School, with fees of up to £5,800 per term. Research supports Pratt: ''a study published by the London School of Economics last year shows that good results do push up house prices.''

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on October 19, 2013
[No link available]

Related publications
Big ideas: Valuing Schooling through House Prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Vol 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
'Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market'. EALE 2010 Presidential Address. Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webapge
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Lebanon Daily Star
U.S. may join 1933 Germany in default pantheon

Reneging on its debt obligations would make the U.S. the first major Western government to default since Nazi Germany 80 years ago. Germany, staggering under the weight of 132 billion gold marks in war reparations and not permitted to export to the victors' markets, was a serial defaulter from 1922, according to Albrecht Ritschl, a professor of economic history at the London School of Economics. That forced the country to borrow to pay its creditors, in what Ritschl calls a Ponzi scheme. ''Reparations were at the heart of the issue in the interwar years'', Ritschl said in a telephone interview. ''The big question is why anyone lent a dime to Germany with those hanging over them. The assumption must have been that reparations would eventually go away.''

The article was published in the Lebanon Daily Star on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

See also
HotNews.md
SUA ar putea deveni prima tara occidentala care intra in default dupa Germania nazista in 1933
Albrecht Ritschl, profesor de istorie a economiei la London School of Economics. Daca o companie care nu-si poate plati datoriile intra in faliment, este divizata, vanduta unui competitor sau se restructureaza, default-ul unei...
Link to article here

Monday 14 October
Gandul.info
SUA ar putea deveni prima tara occidentala care intra in default dupa Germania nazista in 1933
...din 1922, a declarat Albrecht Ritschl, profesor de istorie a economiei la London School of Economics. Daca o companie care nu-si poate plati datoriile intra in faliment, este divizata, vanduta unui competitor sau se restructureaza, default-ul unei...
Link to article here

Related publications
The German Transfer Problem, 1920-1933: A Sovereign Debt Perspective, Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1155, July 2012
Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany, Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Yam (China)
Later business success from confidence in early years

According to a study by the London School of Economics, the loss of confidence due to low class rank can have serious long-term implications for students.

This article was published by Yam (China) on October 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sutton Trust - blog
The lost generation

Blog by Lee Elliot Major (Director of Development and Policy for The Sutton Trust)
The Sutton Trust's seminal study in 2005 by top economists at the LSE catapulted the problem of low and declining social mobility in Britain into a major public and political debate that continues to this day. It found that mobility was lower for the generation born in 1970 compared with that born in 1958. Children who grew up in poorer homes in the 1970s were even more likely than the previous generation to end up poor as adults. And when compared with other developed nations, the UK alongside the US were bottom of the mobility rankings. We had become a less mobile society.

This blog article was posted online on October 11, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust', Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Special Report, April 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Yorkshire Post
Speed may not be all as rail experts remain divided over staying on track

Professor Richard Layard from the London School of Economics and Political Science has done pioneering research into what really makes us happy. In his landmark book Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, he argues that it's not wealth, possessions and extravagant lifestyles that make us happy. It's more the strength of relationships, friends and family, supportive communities, security and a feeling of contributing to society. Long distance travel is not on the list. Perhaps more important, could a world in which mobility becomes ever greater, still give us the things that apparently really matter? ''Some people might place a question mark over whether ever increasing movement makes sense'', notes Prof Layard.

This article was published in The Yorkshire Post on October 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition, 2011.
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Quartz
High-achieving students are better off in worse schools

There is an assumption that children perform better among highly achieving peers. High class achievement might be thought to indicate better teaching, or to induce academic competition between students. However, new research counters (pdf) this common assumption. Felix Weinhardt and Richard Murphy, from the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, analyzed administrative data of over 2.3 million British schoolchildren. This data was used to assess how primary school rank affected later exam results. Pupils were compared on leaving primary school at KS2 (age 11) and at secondary school KS3 (age 14).

This article was published by Quartz.com on September 26, 2013
Link to article here


Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

i (The paper for today)
Letters

STANLEY LUCKHURST READING What schools are for
The LSE study rightly warns parents to be wary of primary school ranking, but more significantly exposes the folly of ranking children at all at such young ages...

The letter was printed in i (the paper for today) on September 25, 2013
[No link available]

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
There's much more to life than being top of the class

With a sharp yank on the tail of every Tiger parent, researchers at the London School of Economics claimed this week that children might do better at a ''worse school'' than an academic one. Far from encouraging less intelligent pupils to achieve, being surrounded by ferociously intellectual classmates can destroy their confidence - whereas being top of the year in a school with lower standards can boost self-esteem and performance.

This article was published in The Daily Telegraph on September 25, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian
Confidence, not peer pressure, is key to success at school, say researchers

A paper, from two academics at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, claims that pupils who rank higher in primary school perform better in secondary school not simply because they are smarter but because their previous success inspires confidence.

This article was published in the Guardian on September 21, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Importance of Rank Position', Richard Murphy and Felix Weinhardt, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1241, September 2013

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Felix Weinhardt webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Vox
Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom

Are children who are non-native speakers making education worse for native speakers? Presenting new research on England, this column by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj uses two different research strategies showing that there are, in fact, no spillover effects. These results support other recent studies on the subject. The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools should not be a cause for concern.

This article was published by Vox online on September 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian - blog
Are London campuses a good or bad thing for UK universities?

More UK universities are setting up shop in the capital, reports Gill Wyness - is this healthy competition or centralised power?

The blog article was published in the Guardian on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Sky News (web)
Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Sky News (web)
Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Sky News (web)
Children 'start school too young': Experts

In a letter to The Daily Telegraph, experts call for changes to a system that they say focuses too early on formal lessons and the Three Rs from the age of four or five, when children should be allowed to play instead. Sir Al Aynsley-Green, the former children's commissioner for England and one of the letter's signatories, told the paper ''If you look at a country like Finland, children don't start formal, full-scale education until they are seven. These extra few years, in my view, provide a crucial opportunity, when supported by well-trained, well-paid and highly-educated staff, for children to be children.'' Other signatories of the letter include Lord Layard, the director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics, Dr David Whitebread, senior lecturer in psychology of education at Cambridge University, and Catherine Prisk, director of Play England.

The feature was broadcast by Sky News on September 12, 2013
Link to article here

Link to original letter to the Daily Telegraph here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Times of Oman
Oman among happiest countries in the world

Oman ranks among the top 25 list of the ''happy countries'' in the world. The Sultanate has been ranked 23rd among 156 nations and second in the Gulf region in the World Happiness Report 2013 released yesterday. The report was edited by Professor John F. Helliwell of the University of British Columbia and the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research; Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at LSE's Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Adviser to the UN Secretary General.

The article was published in The Times of Oman on September 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

3 WRCB-TV (Chattanooga, TN)
Report calls on policy makers to make happiness a key measure and target of development

As heads of state get ready for the United Nations General Assembly in two weeks, the second World Happiness Report further strengthens the case that well-being is a critical component of economic and social development. The report is published by the UN Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN), under the auspices of UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon, and was launched at an international workshop on September 8. The landmark Report, authored by leading experts in economics, psychology, survey analysis, and national statistics, describes how measurements of well-being can be used effectively to assess the progress of nations. The Report is edited by John F. Helliwell, Professor, University of British Columbia, and Senior Fellow and Program Co-Director at CIFAR (the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research); Lord Richard Layard, Director of the Well-Being Programme at the London School of Economics and Political Science's Centre for Economic Performance; and Professor Jeffrey D. Sachs, Director of the Earth Institute at Columbia University, Director of the SDSN, and Special Advisor to the UN Secretary General.

The news item was broadcast by 3 WRCBTV on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

CBC Ottawa
Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

CBC Ottawa
Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

CBC Ottawa
Canada ranks 6th in global happiness survey

Canada has some of the happiest people on the planet because of long life expectancy, high average income and robust social ties, according to a survey sponsored by the United Nations in which Canada ranked sixth. The report, coedited by John Helliwell with Jeffrey Sachs, a professor of development and health policy at Columbia University in New York, and London School of Economics professor emeritus Richard Layard, suggests more countries use citizen happiness as a measure of progress, citing the South Asian kingdom of Bhutan, which has developed a Gross National Happiness Index and aims above all to maximize it.

The news item was broadcast by CBC Canada on September 9, 2013
Link to item here

Related publications
'World Happiness Report 2013', John F. Helliwell, Richard Layard and Jeffrey D. Sachs (Eds), 2nd Report from the Earth Institute, Columbia University, September 2013
Details


Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

ESRC Press Release
Scottish pupils' performance focus on Edinburgh Seminar

How well Scotland's school pupils perform in comparison to their peers across the rest of the UK is the focus of a seminar this coming Wednesday (28 August), hosted by University of Edinburgh. The seminar is part of the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)'s Future of the UK and Scotland activities, which aim to inform the referendum debate and policymaking, whatever the outcome.

Speakers at the event include: Dr Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance, London School of Economics, Professor David Raffe, Centre for Educational Sociology, University of Edinburgh, Dr Bill Maxwell, Chief Executive, Education Scotland, and Kate Davidson, SWAP-East.

A briefing paper written by Dr Gill Wyness can be downloaded here.

For more details of the event, see here.

Related publications
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
'Education in a Devolved Scotland A Quantitative Analysis. A Report to the Economic and Social Research Council', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Valuewalk.com
Five out-of-office ways to invigorate your career this fall

Even if you are not heading back to school, fall can be a great time to energize your career. Here are five ways you can boost your job performance and your overall career satisfaction - and they all involve new beginnings.
Sources: Layard, Richard. Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Penguin Press, 2005

This article was published online by Valuewalk.com on August 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science. Richard Layard, Penguin Press, 2nd edition, 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage

BBC Radio 4
Today programme

Native English-speaking children in primary schools with a high proportion of non-native English speaking children perform just as well as schools where most children are native English-speakers, according from a report in the Journal of the Royal Economic Society. Sue Seifert, former head teacher of Montem Primary School in Islington, and Chris McGovern, from the Campaign for Real Education, discuss whether the findings are accurate.

The article was broadcast at 08:31 on Radio 4's the Today programme on August 27, 2013
Link to programme here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Huffington Post UK
Immigrant children are positive influence on British-born pupils

Academics have scotched fears that non English-speaking children hold back British-born youngsters in the classroom. In fact, in some cases, immigrants were helping drive up standards, the London School of Economics team found. There have been fears that British-born children were being held back because teachers had to help kids who were struggling with a language barrier. However, after examining exam results in different primary schools, the LSE said: ''The growing proportion of non-native English speakers in primary schools should not be a cause for concern: this trend is not detrimental to the educational attainment of native English speakers.''

This article was published by The Huffington Post UK on August 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) website
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Observer
Real recovery needs an overhaul of the investment machine

It could also do worse than pinch a few ideas from the LSE's excellent Growth Commission report, and promise to depoliticise national infrastructure decisions and beef up education for poorer kids. All of these would help to build a more solid, sustainable business model.

This article was published in The Observer on August 25, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report - 'Investing for Prosperity Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation', by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013
Link to Report here

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website

Essex Chronicle
Catchment is king...

Thanks to some research published last year by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the link between schools and house prices is now a proven fact rather than merely the stuff of anecdote and dinner-table chatter.

The article was published in the Essex Chronicle on August 22, 2013
[No link available]

Related publications
Big ideas valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
'Houses and Schools Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Scotsman
Alex Massie: Students can't all be above average

These test results, however, mask vast internal inequalities. As Gill Wyness, an education researcher at the London School of Economics, observed this week, the richest quarter of Scottish pupils performed at a level comparable with the average score in high-achieving Hong Kong but the poorest quartile's results were on a par with low-achieving Turkey. The Scottish government's own analysis of the 2009 Pisa tests concluded that ''while socio-economic status is as likely as in other countries to affect students, the effect it has is likely to be greater than in other countries''. Which is another way of saying that it is better to be poor in other countries than it is to be poor in Scotland.

This article was published in The Scotsman on August 16, 2013
Link to article here

See also
Friday 9 August
Spectator Blogs - Alex Massie
Scotland's disgraceful educational apartheid
Still, the educational divides in this country should be a front-page scandal. As I wrote in yesterday's Scotsman: These test results, however, mask vast internal inequalities. As Gill Wyness, an education researcher at the London School of Economics, observed this week, the richest quarter of Scottish pupils performed at a level comparable with the average score in high-achieving Hong Kong but the poorest quartile's results were on a par with low-achieving Turkey. The Scottish government's own analysis of the 2009 Pisa tests concluded that ''while socio-economic status is as likely as in other countries to affect students, the effect it has is likely to be greater than in other countries''. Which is another way of saying that it is better to be poor in other countries than it is to be poor in Scotland.
Link to article here

Related publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness.
Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Scotsman
Education 'has failed to improve with devolution'

Academics at the London School of Economics (LSE) said that while the Scottish system remains on a par with those elsewhere in the UK, it has not progressed at the same rate as the English system since 1999. The authors of the report note that the performance of the education system is one of the questions that voters may consider in the run-up to next year's independence referendum. Written by Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally, of LSE's Centre for Economic Performance, the report states: ''Our analysis of national statistics showed that Scotland's performance has been very stable over time whilst, in contrast, England's performance has been increasing.''

This article was published by The Scotsman on August 15, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013
'Education in a Devolved Scotland A Quantitative Analysis. A Report to the Economic and Social Research Council', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Forbes India - Magazine
The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage

Forbes India - Magazine
The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage

Forbes India - Magazine
The correlation between money and happiness

Money and happiness have been married and divorced umpteen times by economists. A recent study by University of Michigan professors Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers united moolah and mirth after Richard Easterlin, an economist and professor at the University of South Carolina, separated them in 1974. While the Easterlin Paradox stated that rise in income does not necessarily increase happiness, the new research refutes it by proving that the higher the income or the GDP (Gross Domestic Product), the more happy the person or the country is. No conditions apply. Between the two polar studies, several researchers tried to bring money and happiness together by establishing a threshold till which they hold hands before parting ways. For instance, in 2003, British economist Richard Layard set $15,000 as the point beyond which money does not fetch happiness. In his 2005 work, Layard reset the point at $20,000 a year.

This article was published by Forbes India on August 12, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2nd edition, Penguin, April 2011
Details

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy webpage

Sverigesradio.se
Sveriges extrema skolmarknad oroar forskare

The Swedish school system is unique in the world with its harsh competition, large choice and for-profit private schools. Last week brought together the elite of international research at the free school selection and market principles in the school of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm... Participants: Henry m. Levin, professor of education administration at Teachers College at Columbia University, New York. Sabrina Harris, master student from the United States, currently at the University of Stockholm, Patrik Scheinin, a professor of behavioral science at the University of Helsinki. Sandra McNally, a professor of Economics at the London School of economics.

The item was broadcast on SverigesRadio.se on August12, 2013
Link to item here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sun - Scotland
Lesson Failure

THE London School of Economics says Scotland may be better off tackling inequalities in education if it becomes independent. Granting more say to politicians is not the answer.

This article was published in The Sun -Scotland on August 9, 2013
[subscription only]

Related publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness.
Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Dagbladet (Norway)
En gate ingen vil lose

Eller ta arbeidslivet. Politikerne bekymrer seg for at dagens velferdsniva trues av manglende arbeidskraft. Vi vet at flere uforetrygdes pa grunn av psykiske lidelser, og at det er en kraftig okning i sykefraværet for lettere psykiske lidelser. Okonomen Richard Layard har for lengst vist at lett tilgjengelig psykologisk behandling er selvfinansierende, ikke minst fordi folk kommer tilbake i arbeid.
A puzzle noone will solve
Or take the world of work. Politicians worry that the current level is threatened by a lack of welfare workers. We know that more uføretrygdes because of mental illness, and that there is a sharp increase in sick leave for easier mental disorders. The economist Richard Layard has long since proven that readily available psychological treatment is self-sustaining, not least because people are going back to work.

This article was published by Dagbladet on August 8, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. June 2006

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental health research webpage

Dagbladet (Norway)
En gate ingen vil lose

Eller ta arbeidslivet. Politikerne bekymrer seg for at dagens velferdsniva trues av manglende arbeidskraft. Vi vet at flere uforetrygdes pa grunn av psykiske lidelser, og at det er en kraftig okning i sykefraværet for lettere psykiske lidelser. Okonomen Richard Layard har for lengst vist at lett tilgjengelig psykologisk behandling er selvfinansierende, ikke minst fordi folk kommer tilbake i arbeid.
A puzzle noone will solve
Or take the world of work. Politicians worry that the current level is threatened by a lack of welfare workers. We know that more uføretrygdes because of mental illness, and that there is a sharp increase in sick leave for easier mental disorders. The economist Richard Layard has long since proven that readily available psychological treatment is self-sustaining, not least because people are going back to work.

This article was published by Dagbladet on August 8, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders by Richard Layard. June 2006

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Mental health research webpage

Tayside and Fife Courier
Scottish education could help tackle education inequalities

Educational inequality is ''a huge problem that devolution has been unable to solve''... Scotland ''is unable to raise taxes or alter many other aspects of fiscal policy, which somewhat limits the level and distribution of spending on education'', according to a blog by LSE economist Stephen Machin and education researchers Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness.

This article was published in the Tayside and Fife Courier on August 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Guardian Higher Education Network blog
Scottish education: why don't the sums add up?

Gill Wyness asks how Scottish higher education participation rates are so high when inequality of school attainment is rife.

This blog piece by Gill Wyness was published in the Guardian on August 5, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Sunday Times
Baby first, job later for young women

10 years earlier, after several decades in which female employment rates were on a rising trend, according to research by Alan Manning of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. ''The main message is that the youngest generations of women are not working any more than slightly older women, so female labour market progress has stalled'', he said.

This article appeared in The Sunday Times on July 28, 2013
[Subscription necessary to view the article.]

Related links
Newspaper articles based on charts Prof Manning showed in a lecture for the royal statistical society in 2010. Details
Alan Manning webpage
Communities Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Class worrier

The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Financial Times
Class worrier

The research, conducted for the charity by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, found that ''intergenerational mobility fell markedly over time in Britain, with there being less mobility for a cohort of people born in 1970 compared to a cohort born in 1958.''

This article was published in the Financial Times on July 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Mail online
State schools cost parents 40,000 a child: Extra-curricular activities, transport and breakfast clubs see costs add up

Research by the London School of Economics last year found parents could save themselves around £26,000 during primary years alone by avoiding fees at independent schools and moving to areas with top state schools.

This article was published by the Mail online on July 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices by Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Mail online
State schools cost parents 40,000 a child: Extra-curricular activities, transport and breakfast clubs see costs add up

Research by the London School of Economics last year found parents could save themselves around £26,000 during primary years alone by avoiding fees at independent schools and moving to areas with top state schools.

This article was published by the Mail online on July 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices by Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Bobby D Show
10 things that put you in a better mood...and eight that make it worse

Researchers at the London School of Economics asked people to keep track of what MOOD they were in, using a smartphone app. Here are the 10 activities that improve your mood the MOST:...

This article was broadcast on the Bobby D (radio) Show on July 3, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Bobby D Show
10 things that put you in a better mood...and eight that make it worse

Researchers at the London School of Economics asked people to keep track of what MOOD they were in, using a smartphone app. Here are the 10 activities that improve your mood the MOST:...

This article was broadcast on the Bobby D (radio) Show on July 3, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Are you happy while you work?, Alex Bryson and George MacKerron. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1 Summer 2013
'Are you happy while you work?', Alex Bryson and George MacKerron, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1187, February 2013

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Financial Times
In pursuit of happiness

Over the past decade, Easterlin's core premise has been expanded upon by research in other fields. In Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, a professor at the London School of Economics, proposed seven areas that could explain the paradox, and that should be the focus of policy makers - family relationships, friends, employment, financial situation, health, personal freedom and personal values. Layard does not dismiss money - and as a labour economist stresses the misery caused by unemployment - but the Easterlin paradox is an important assumption behind his work. And while much of this is intuitive, happiness research implies a scope of analysis and a response that is alien to most governments.

This article was published in the Financial Times on June 27, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science by Richard Layard. Penguin, 2nd edition, April 2011.
Details.

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

guardian.co.uk - Higher Education Network blog
University admissions: can contextual data open doors to poorer students?

Without students achieving the right combination of subjects and grades, it's hard to see how using contextual information would solve the problem and ensure fairness, argues Gill Wyness.

The article was published in the guardian.co.uk Higher Education Network blog on June 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Financial Times
Fall in joblessness fails to prove Spain's case for economic revival

But my sense is they will only do the reforms that are impossible to avoid and where there is strong pressure from the EU, said Luis Garicano of the London School of Economics. Both private sector economists and academics have warned of the danger of complacency, arguing the government must not succumb to reform fatigue.

This article appeared in Financial Times on 5 June 2013 link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Daily Telegraph
Don't blame the pushy middle-class parents for the lack of social mobility

Then there is the issue of what has happened to social mobility over the past 50 years. Most participants in this debate take as their starting point a famous study conducted by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Paul Gregg, three economists at the LSE, that discovered that children born in the bottom income quartile in 1958 had a higher chance of making it out than those born in 1970.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 4 June 2013 link to article

Related Publications
Joint Sutton Trust and CEP report by by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin,titled Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, June 2002 Paper No' CEEDP0026
Article by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin in CentrePiece, Spring 2005 titled Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling

Related Links
Jo Blanden's webpage
Stephen Machin's webpage

ESRC - press release
Researchers celebrated for outstanding impact

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has rewarded researchers for their outstanding economic and social impact in the first Celebrating Impact Prize. The winners and runners up were announced at the awards ceremony held at Church House in Westminster, London on 14 May by BBC broadcaster and former economics editor, Evan Davis. The applications were judged by a panel of experts from business, academia and the public sector. The shortlisted entrants were invited to attend an interview, with a user of their research, to further demonstrate to the panel their role in achieving outstanding research impact. There were six categories in the prize.... Second place was awarded to:... Mr Richard Murphy, London School of Economics, for Outstanding Early Career Impact.

The press release was published on the ESRC news website on May 15, 2013
Link to the release here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ESRC - press release
Researchers celebrated for outstanding impact

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has rewarded researchers for their outstanding economic and social impact in the first Celebrating Impact Prize. The winners and runners up were announced at the awards ceremony held at Church House in Westminster, London on 14 May by BBC broadcaster and former economics editor, Evan Davis. The applications were judged by a panel of experts from business, academia and the public sector. The shortlisted entrants were invited to attend an interview, with a user of their research, to further demonstrate to the panel their role in achieving outstanding research impact. There were six categories in the prize.... Second place was awarded to:... Mr Richard Murphy, London School of Economics, for Outstanding Early Career Impact.

The press release was published on the ESRC news website on May 15, 2013
Link to the release here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ESRC - press release
Researchers celebrated for outstanding impact

The Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) has rewarded researchers for their outstanding economic and social impact in the first Celebrating Impact Prize. The winners and runners up were announced at the awards ceremony held at Church House in Westminster, London on 14 May by BBC broadcaster and former economics editor, Evan Davis. The applications were judged by a panel of experts from business, academia and the public sector. The shortlisted entrants were invited to attend an interview, with a user of their research, to further demonstrate to the panel their role in achieving outstanding research impact. There were six categories in the prize.... Second place was awarded to:... Mr Richard Murphy, London School of Economics, for Outstanding Early Career Impact.

The press release was published on the ESRC news website on May 15, 2013
Link to the release here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Financial Times
Chinese lessons for Yahoo's boss

Although that particular form of indolence known as "working from home" is out of fashion at Yahoo, where Ms Mayer has told staff to work from the office, it is getting its first tentative trials in China. One local government in Shanghai is trying to promote the concept by working with Ctrip, China's largest, Nasdaq-listed travel agency. Ctrip told local Chinese news that it had lowered its usual requirements for age and appearance, and focused more on honesty and responsibility when deciding which employees should be allowed to work without coming to the office. The company's CEO, James Liang, wrote up Ctrip's nine-month experiment in home-working with Stanford University professor Nicholas Bloom, concluding that performance increased dramatically and attrition fell sharply - while the company saved about $2,000 per employee per year worked at home.

This article was published in the Financial Times on May 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Financial Times
Chinese lessons for Yahoo's boss

Although that particular form of indolence known as "working from home" is out of fashion at Yahoo, where Ms Mayer has told staff to work from the office, it is getting its first tentative trials in China. One local government in Shanghai is trying to promote the concept by working with Ctrip, China's largest, Nasdaq-listed travel agency. Ctrip told local Chinese news that it had lowered its usual requirements for age and appearance, and focused more on honesty and responsibility when deciding which employees should be allowed to work without coming to the office. The company's CEO, James Liang, wrote up Ctrip's nine-month experiment in home-working with Stanford University professor Nicholas Bloom, concluding that performance increased dramatically and attrition fell sharply - while the company saved about $2,000 per employee per year worked at home.

This article was published in the Financial Times on May 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Working from Home Work? Evidence from a Chinese Experiment', Nicholas Bloom, James Liang, John Roberts and Zhichun Jenny Ying, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1194, March 2013

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Guardian
How would UK higher education fare if Britain left the EU?

Students might benefit in the short term but we risk falling standards and increased taxpayer costs, says Gill Wyness
What impact would leaving the EU have on the UK's higher education sector? Research suggests a departure could lead to declining quality and standards in UK universities, and could actually increase higher education costs to the taxpayer.

This article was published in The Guardian on May 14, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Gill Wyness publications webpage

BBC World Service
Business Edition with Tanya Beckett

Professor Albrecht Ritschl was interviewed from Berlin about World War 2 reparations.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service on May 13, 2013

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage

BBC World Service
Business Edition with Tanya Beckett

Professor Albrecht Ritschl was interviewed from Berlin about World War 2 reparations.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service on May 13, 2013

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Evening Standard
Time to unblock the growth path

It should not be as difficult as we seem to make it. A working group at the London School of Economics pointed out a few months ago that growth is neither about the size of the state or about deregulation. It is about whether the state is smart in the way it regulates and spends. We need well-designed policies to support growth and we need an institutional framework that delivers good policy.

This article appeared in the Evening Standard on May 9, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report - Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation, by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website

Zoom News
La receta de Alemania contra el paro jevenil no sirve para Espaa

...la relacion entre empresario y aprendiz", apunta Hilary Steedman, investigadora de la London School of Economics. En el mejor de los supuestos, la formacion dual es una experiencia adaptable a las realidades de otros países europeos. Pero incluso..
Dual training allows Germany to reduce youth unemployment crisis
Experts say it is a difficult scheme exportable to other countries... There is also a cultural and historical dimension dual training not to ignore. And is that "for more than a century, governments in which there is this learning, such as Austria, Germany and Switzerland have sought to balance the relationship between employer and apprentice", says Hilary Steedman, a researcher at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by Zoom News on May 1, 2013
Link to article here
Translate

Related publications
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010: International Comparisons - Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman, CEP Special Report No.22, September 2010

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Zoom News
La receta de Alemania contra el paro jevenil no sirve para Espaa

...la relacion entre empresario y aprendiz", apunta Hilary Steedman, investigadora de la London School of Economics. En el mejor de los supuestos, la formacion dual es una experiencia adaptable a las realidades de otros países europeos. Pero incluso..
Dual training allows Germany to reduce youth unemployment crisis
Experts say it is a difficult scheme exportable to other countries... There is also a cultural and historical dimension dual training not to ignore. And is that "for more than a century, governments in which there is this learning, such as Austria, Germany and Switzerland have sought to balance the relationship between employer and apprentice", says Hilary Steedman, a researcher at the London School of Economics.

This article was published by Zoom News on May 1, 2013
Link to article here
Translate

Related publications
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010: International Comparisons - Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman, CEP Special Report No.22, September 2010

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The New Yorker
The economic case for and against Thatcherism

Another way of saying a society is classless is to say it exhibits a lot of social mobility. But studies show that since Mrs. Thatcher came to power, in 1979, social mobility has gone down rather than up. Far from becoming more classless, Britain has gotten even more class bound. Some of the progress that was made during the post-war years has been reversed. The seminal paper in this area was published about ten years ago by four British economists (Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin, Alissa Goodman, and Paul Gregg) who analyzed the incomes of one group of Britons born in 1958 (the pre-Thatcher cohort) and one born in 1970 (the post-Thatcher cohort). Specifically, the researchers looked at how closely correlated each person's income was with the income of their parents. If the correlation co-efficient is high, it means economic status is passed down the generations, which is happens in a class-ridden society. Here is the conclusion of the study: "Even though these cohorts are only twelve years different in age we see sharp falls in cross-generation mobility of economic status between the cohorts. The economic status of the 1970 cohort is much more strongly connected to parental economic status than the 1958 cohort."

This article was published in The New Yorker on April 10, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain', Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.517, January 2002
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain', Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.26, June 2002
'Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain' by Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Chapter 6 in Miles Corak (ed.), Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, Cambridge University Press, 2004, pp:122-146.

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Jo Blanden webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

LSE Politics and Policy blog
The Chancellor has finally shifted towards stimulating growth

Commenting on the Chancellor's budget, Linda Yueh sees a lot of positive stimulus measures that are better late than never, such as increased infrastructure spending and measures to cut corporate taxes. However, the Chancellor could have done more to boost confidence by setting out a convincing vision instead of knitting together disparate pieces of stimulus.

This article was published by the LSE Politics and Policy blog on March 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Linda Yueh webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Financial Times
Squeezed middle battles financial pain

These phenomena have helped to change the pattern of inequality since the turn of the century, says Steve Machin, research director at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance. During the 1980s and 1990s, he says, both the top and the bottom of the earnings distribution "fell away from the middle".

This article was printed in the Financial Times on March 20, 2013
Link to article here

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

The Economist
Credit in the euro area: still crunching

A recent paper by Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender of the London School of Economics looked at the impact of financial constraints in Spain. By comparing firms that are foreign-owned, and therefore have access to other forms of financing, with those that are domestic, and so rely on local banks, the authors can see what uncertainty about financial access did to their decision-making after the 2008 crisis. The Spanish-owned firms cut investment by 19 percent more than the foreign-owned companies, and reduced employment by 6 percent more.

The article was published in The Economist on March 9, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Survive Another Day: Does Uncertain Financing Affect the Composition of Investment?', Luis Garicano and Claudia Steinwender, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1188, February 2013

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Claudia Steinwender webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

TES
Australia debates pros and cons of low apprentice pay

Wages are high in general in Australia, but the minimum apprentice wage is more than double the average pay for apprentices in countries such as Austria and Switzerland, according to a 2010 report by Hilary Steedman at the London School of Economics. Dr Steedman has argued that the success of apprenticeships in these countries and in Germany is due to low initial wages, which encourages the employer to invest in training.

This article was published in the TES Comment online on March 8, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010: International Comparisons - Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland. A Report for the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network by Hilary Steedman, CEP Special Report No.22, September 2010

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

Huffington Post UK
A Degree Is No Longer Enough

The number of people with postgraduate qualifications has almost trebled since the mid-1990s, as employers expect more from potential employees, research by the Sutton Trust suggests. But the study raises concerns that students from lower and middle-class families are being priced out, leaving postgraduate study the preserve of the better off.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 7 February 2013 link to article

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013 link to report

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

INSEAD
Dirty little habits: cleaning up the auto industry

Dirty habits die hard and the only way to encourage auto makers to adopt clean technology is a short sharp shock in the fuel price. It's a radical approach, but research suggests it could work. David Hemous and his co researchers - Philippe Aghion of Harvard University and Antoine Dechezlepretre, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics - analysed data on auto industry technology patents over several decades. They distinguished between "dirty" technologies (petrol and diesel engines) and "clean" technology (electric and hybrid) and wanted to identify what could influence auto makers to adopt innovative, clean technology. Since 1978 globally, "dirty" patents outnumbered "clean technology" patents by a ratio of 3:1.

This article was published online by INSEAD on February 7, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Carbon Taxes, Path Dependency and Directed Technical Change: Evidence from the Auto Industry', Philippe Aghion, Antoine Dechezlepretre, David Hemous, Ralf Martin and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1178, November 2012

Related links
Ralf Martin webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

MSN UK (Web)
Postgraduate degrees 'expected'

The number of people with postgraduate qualifications has almost trebled since the mid-1990s, as employers expect more from potential employees, research by the Sutton Trust suggests. But the study raises concerns that students from lower and middle-class families are being priced out, leaving postgraduate study the preserve of the better-off.

This article appeared in MSN UK online on February 7, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

The Times online
Higher fees will exclude poorer graduates from further study

People who cannot afford to stay on at university for years of extra study are being priced out of the best-paid jobs, a study has shown.

The article was printed in The Times online on February 7, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

Financial Times
Postgraduate study costs 'threaten social mobility'

Graduates with only one degree are at an increasing disadvantage in the UK job market owing to a surge in postgraduate qualifications, which can boost an individual's earning potential by £200,000 over a lifetime, new research has shown. Professor Stephen Machin, one of the report's authors, said the rising wage differentials for those with the highest levels of education alongside rising higher educational inequality would make existing low levels of social mobility in Britain and the US even harder to shift.

This article was published in the Financial Times on February 7, 2013
Link to article here


Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

The Guardian
Rising number of postgraduates could become barrier to social mobility'

While good careers were formerly open to those with only A-levels, the bulk were currently only accessible if you had a degree, the Sutton Trust said, something which might soon become the case for postgraduate qualifications. Research for the trust by the London School of Economics and Surrey University shows that while in 1996 just 4% of working Britons aged 26 to 60 had a postgraduate qualification, this was now 11%, or 2.1 million people. The study found those with a higher degree earned around £5,500 a year more on average, equating to a career-long postgraduate premium of around £200,000.

This article was published in The Guardian on February 7, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin. Sutton Trust Research Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

The Sunday Times
We've been on a roll - and can do it again

Britain's economy. It set out some good ideas about how to generate growth over the medium and long term through infrastructure, innovation, education and skills. More striking was that the London School of Economics (LSE) Growth Commission stressed that Britain approaches the future with very considerable advantages, and an economy that is far from broken.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 3 February 2013 link to article

Related publications
LSE Growth Commission Report Investing for Prosperity: Skills, Infrastructure and Innovation by Philippe Aghion, Timothy Besley, John Browne, Francesco Caselli, Richard Lambert, Rachel Lomax, Christopher Pissarides, Nick Stern and John Van Reenen, January 2013 link to report

Related links
Francesco Caselli webpage
Christopher Pissarides webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
LSE Growth Commission website

The Economist
Northern Lights

The Nordics also have a strong record of drawing on the talents of their entire populations, with the possible exception of their immigrants. They have the world's highest rates of social mobility: in a comparison of social mobility in eight advanced countries by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, of the London School of Economics, they occupied the first four places. America and Britain came last.

The article was published in The Economist on February 1, 2013
Link to article

Related publications
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain, Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. In Corak, M. (ed), Generational Income Mobility in North America and Europe, Cambridge University Press, 2004.
Sutton Trust: Summary Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in the UK: A Summary of Findings
Main Report - Recent Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain by Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, December 2007
Report for the Sutton Trust: Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article appeared in CentrePiece, Vol.10, Issue 1 Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Financial Times
What price a top state school?

"A link between better schools and higher house prices is one of the most stable empirical regularities worldwide", writes the economist Steve Gibbons in Centrepiece, a magazine published by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance. His colleague Stephen Machin has published a more academic review of the literature, reaching much the same conclusion: the ability to send your children to one of the best schools rather than one of the worst will add 15 to 20 per cent to the value of your home. (Internationally, estimates range from about 5 per cent to 40 per cent.)

This article was published in the Financial Times on January 25, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
'Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through then Housing Market - EALE 2010 Presidential Address', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Steve Gibbons webpage
Steve Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE webpage

Reuters
Studies outline cost of crime in Latin America

Crime doesn't pay is a familiar adage. But it certainly costs.

A series of original studies commissioned by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) quantify the costs of crime and violence in Latin America and the Caribbean using a combination of crime, health and economic statistics to come to fresh conclusions. In Brazil, one study found people pay an extra $13 billion to gain a sense of security alone, while in Uruguay economic activity suffers a negative impact of more than 3.0 percent of gross domestic product, while long-term generational impacts are found on the health of babies born to mothers who suffer from physical violence.

In a separate study, pregnant women in Brazil are more likely to give birth to underweight babies if they live in high crime areas and are themselves poorly educated. ''This suggests that violence adds up to the mechanisms that affect the transmission of socioeconomic status between parents and their offspring'', wrote researchers at the University of Leicester and Queen Mary University of London.

This article was published by Reuters online on January 24, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Life and Death in the Favelas. An analysis of the effect of homicide rates on birth outcomes in Brazil, Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner and Marco Manacorda, conference paper, January 2013.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Reuters
Studies outline cost of crime in Latin America

Crime doesn't pay is a familiar adage. But it certainly costs.

A series of original studies commissioned by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) quantify the costs of crime and violence in Latin America and the Caribbean using a combination of crime, health and economic statistics to come to fresh conclusions. In Brazil, one study found people pay an extra $13 billion to gain a sense of security alone, while in Uruguay economic activity suffers a negative impact of more than 3.0 percent of gross domestic product, while long-term generational impacts are found on the health of babies born to mothers who suffer from physical violence.

In a separate study, pregnant women in Brazil are more likely to give birth to underweight babies if they live in high crime areas and are themselves poorly educated. ''This suggests that violence adds up to the mechanisms that affect the transmission of socioeconomic status between parents and their offspring'', wrote researchers at the University of Leicester and Queen Mary University of London.

This article was published by Reuters online on January 24, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Life and Death in the Favelas. An analysis of the effect of homicide rates on birth outcomes in Brazil, Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner and Marco Manacorda, conference paper, January 2013.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Reuters
Studies outline cost of crime in Latin America

Crime doesn't pay is a familiar adage. But it certainly costs.

A series of original studies commissioned by the Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) quantify the costs of crime and violence in Latin America and the Caribbean using a combination of crime, health and economic statistics to come to fresh conclusions. In Brazil, one study found people pay an extra $13 billion to gain a sense of security alone, while in Uruguay economic activity suffers a negative impact of more than 3.0 percent of gross domestic product, while long-term generational impacts are found on the health of babies born to mothers who suffer from physical violence.

In a separate study, pregnant women in Brazil are more likely to give birth to underweight babies if they live in high crime areas and are themselves poorly educated. ''This suggests that violence adds up to the mechanisms that affect the transmission of socioeconomic status between parents and their offspring'', wrote researchers at the University of Leicester and Queen Mary University of London.

This article was published by Reuters online on January 24, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
Life and Death in the Favelas. An analysis of the effect of homicide rates on birth outcomes in Brazil, Martin Foureaux Koppensteiner and Marco Manacorda, conference paper, January 2013.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Financial Times
Academies overpaid in Whitehall funding blunder

But schools that now become academies do not get a management change nor are they failing. Stephen Machin, a professor at LSE who led the research on the original academies, said it ''may be, in due course, that these new academies do deliver performance improvements. But we know nothing of this yet''.

This article was published by the Financial Times on January 10, 2013
Link to article webpage

Related publications
'Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education', Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, CEE Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011
Academy schools: who benefits?, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
For further reading : A Note on Academy School Policy, CEP Policy Analysis, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit (2010)

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
James Vernoit webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CEE website

Guardian
White working-class males: how to get more into university

Second, we need to move beyond the often polarised debate between blaming universities and blaming schools. It is true that according to the General Teaching Council, one in four primary schools has no male teachers. Similarly, according to the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE, boys at secondary schools believe female teachers will give them lower grades – and invest less effort as a consequence.

This article was published by the Guardian on January 7, 2013
Link to article here

Related publications
'Students' Perceptions of Teacher Biases: Experimental Economics in Schools' by Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 133, January 2012
Pupils' progress: how children's perceptions influence their efforts Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2011/2012

Related links
Amine Ouazad webpage
Amine Ouazad CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website