London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2014


International New York Times
Along with art and jewels, the rich now collect passports

“These programs bring huge benefits to the Russian oligarchs or the various Chinese wanting to benefit from the rule of law, good educations and robust capital markets,” said David Metcalf, chairman of the British government’s Migration Advisory Committee and a professor emeritus at the London School of Economics. “But the fundamental question is, What does everyone else get out of it?”

This article appeared in the International New York Times on 15 December 2014 link to article

Also in:
CNBC
Latest rich collectible: Passports link to article

Weekly Voice
Collecting passports is the new fad for those with the money link to article

Related links
David Metcalf webpage
Labour Markets webpage
David Metcalf CEP publications webpage

Vox
We don't need no (management) education?

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Schools with greater autonomy often perform well, but there is disagreement over whether this is due to better management or cherry-picking of students. Based on interviews with over 1,800 head teachers, this column finds that management quality is strongly correlated with pupil performance. Autonomous schools have better management, and this result does not appear to be driven by pupil composition or other observable factors. However, autonomy for head teachers is not enough - accountability to school governors is also needed.

This article was published online by Vox on December 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Matter in Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Vox
We don't need no (management) education?

Article by Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen
Schools with greater autonomy often perform well, but there is disagreement over whether this is due to better management or cherry-picking of students. Based on interviews with over 1,800 head teachers, this column finds that management quality is strongly correlated with pupil performance. Autonomous schools have better management, and this result does not appear to be driven by pupil composition or other observable factors. However, autonomy for head teachers is not enough - accountability to school governors is also needed.

This article was published online by Vox on December 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Matter in Schools?', Nicholas Bloom, Renata Lemos, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1312, November 2014

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Guardian
What should we do with private schools?

Over the last decade or so, however, it has been from economists at the London School of Economics, notably Jo Blanden and Stephen Machin, that the highest-profile and most influential findings on social mobility have come. This has been, above all, through their use of two birth cohort studies – one of them tracking the lives of all children born in Britain in one week in 1958, the other doing the same for the children of one week in 1970. In essence, they have found that the economic status of the 1970 cohort is, compared with the earlier cohort, more dependent on family background – and that accordingly, social mobility in early 21st century Britain is in decline.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 6 December 2014 link to article

Related Publications
A continuing downward trend in intergenerational mobility? Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin, October 2008 Paper No' CEPCP263
Changes in Intergenerational Mobility in Britain Jo Blanden, Alissa Goodman, Paul Gregg, Stephen Machin, January 2002 Paper No' CEPDP0517

Related Links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage
Labour Markets webpage

The Conversation
Chancellor's Autumn Statement: the experts respond

The chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, has delivered the financial package he hopes will convince voters to deliver a Conservative majority in May 2015. Here, a team of academic experts [that includes the Centre for Economic Performance's Director Professor John Van Reenen and Research Associate Dr Jo Blanden] responds to the contents of the Autumn Statement.

This article was published online by The Conversation on December 3, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

World Economic Forum
How to conduct social science

[Joshua] Angrist, the Ford Professor of Economics, has long been one of the leading advocates of research that uses ''ceteris paribus'' [other things being equal] principles. Now, along with Jorn-Steffen Pischke of the London School of Economics, Angrist has written a book on the subject for a general audience, Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect, published later this month by Princeton University Press.

This article was published online by the World Economic Forum blog on December 1, 2014
Link to article here.

Related publications
Mastering Metrics: The Path from Cause to Effect by Joshua Angrist and Jörn-Steffen Pischke, Princeton University Press, December 2014
Details

Related links
Jörn-Steffen Pischke webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Guardian
We should not let universities decide how to spend money on poor students

Article by Gill Wyness
Decentralising forms of financial support may harm access and increase inequality says Gill Wyness. ... Universities are becoming more active in offering financial support to poor students, over and above what is provided by the government in maintenance loans and grants. The problem is, these decentralised forms of support - in which universities themselves decide who to support and how - may actually do more harm than good.

This article was published in the Guardian on November 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief...Economics of higher education, Richard Murphy and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2014

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Prospect Magazine
Will Britain get a payrise?

What if in our relatively deregulated flexible labour market-where the balance of workplace power favours bosses, many people are engaged on flexible performance-based contracts, and new technology is sweeping away jobs that once paid well-there will never be a return to the days when workers of every type could always rely on a pay rise? Economists such as David Blanchflower, one-time member of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee, and Stephen Machin, who currently sits on the Low Pay Commission which makes recommendations on the level of the hourly minimum wage, point to the experience of the United States, which gave us the blueprint for labour market de-regulation. The real median weekly wage for full-time US employees has more or less flatlined since the 1970s, proving that pay stagnation is not beyond the realm of possibility. ...

As two of Britain's leading labour market economists Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin outlined in a report published by the Resolution Foundation, a think tank, far less unemployment is now needed to bear down on inflationary wage and price pressures. ...

A flexible labour market that favours jobs over pay during tough times is clearly preferable to one that results in the economic and social pain of mass unemployment. Better still, if the economic recovery is sustained long enough to combine a continued fall in unemployment with strengthening productivity growth, we could be on the verge of the kind of labour market scenario George Osborne must dream of: full employment and rising real living standards. However, this positive picture doesn't necessarily translate into an equally rosy outlook for pay. One reason, as research by John van Reenan, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, has shown, is that even when productivity rises employers are nowadays more likely to improve non-wage elements of reward packages-which include contributions to staff pensions and health insurance, plus employers' national insurance contributions-at the expense of pay increases.



This article was published by Prospect Magazine on November 13, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
What a drag: the chilling impact of unemployment on real wages, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Resolution Foundation Report, September 2012
'Decoupling of wage growth and productivity growth? Myth and reality', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1246, October 2013
Wage growth and productivity growth: the myth and reality of 'decoupling', Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Magazine, Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Journal of Turkish Weekly
The effect of immigration on public finances

Much attention of researchers and policy-makers has been directed at the effects of immigration on the wages and employment of natives in the host country (for example, Friedberg and Hunt 1995; Manacorda et al 2012; Dustmann et al 2013). But most empirical studies have failed to find any convincing evidence of substantial negative impact. ... Research in several countries suggests that immigrants are typically healthier than natives when arriving (unsurprisingly if the economic gains from migrating for work are greater for the more healthy), but they assimilate to native health levels over time. It would therefore be odd if burdens on health spending were very much different to those from comparable UK-born. Wadsworth (2013), for example, shows no difference, which is compatible with what has been found for other countries. The potential impact of immigration on crime rates is sometimes cited as an issue. But again, empirical work across several countries offers little to confirm such fears. Bell et al (2013) and Jaitman and Machin (2013), for example, show that the most recent wave of UK immigration has had no evident impact on crime rates.

This article was published by The Journal of Turkish Weekly on November 5, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Bell, B, F Fasani and S Machin (2013) Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves, Review of Economics and Statistics 95: 1278-1290.
'Crime and Immigration: Evidence from Large Immigrant Waves', Brian Bell, Francesco Fasani and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.984, June 2010
Geay, C, S McNally and S Telhaj (2013) Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?, Economic Journal 123: F281-307.
In brief: Language barriers: The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?' by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
Jaitman, L and S Machin (2013) Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales, IZA Journal of Migration 2(19).
'Crime and Immigration: New Evidence from England and Wales', Laura Jaitman, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1238, September 2013
Machin, S and R Murphy (2014) 'Paying Out and Crowding Out: The Globalisation of Higher Education', Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No 1299, September 2014.
Manacorda, M, A Manning and J Wadsworth (2012) The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain, Journal of the European Economic Association 10: 120-51.
'The Impact of Immigration on the Structure of Male Wages: Theory and Evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
Wadsworth, J (2013) Musn't Grumble: Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and Germany, Fiscal Studies 34: 55-82.
'Musn't Grumble. Immigration, Health and Health Service Use in the UK and German', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Mail Online UK
High speed rail 'tsar' to spark fresh controversy with new HS2 route and stations recommendations

A panel of academic experts told the Treasury select committee that the report overstated the benefits by six to eight times. Henry Overman, professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, who is to give evidence to the committee on Tuesday, said findings used a procedure that was 'essentially made up'.

This article appeared in the Daily Mail on October 24, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
HS2: assessing the costs and benefits Henry Overman, February 2012 Paper No' CEPCP361 in CentrePiece Vol. 16 Issue. 3 Winter

Related Links
Henry Overman webpage
SERC webpage
Globalisation webpage

The Guardian
Low pay is breaking Britain's public finances: the evidence can't be denied

Permanent low pay threatens to overtake us, with the Treasury, hit by lower tax receipts, facing an ever-rising benefits bill.
On Wednesday Steve Machin, research director at the LSE's centre for economic performance, laid out to a meeting of economists the collected evidence on the nature of falling pay - and warned that this is beginning to look not like a slow recovery in wages, but a permanent, structural feature of the UK economy. He showed how the group-think of economic forecasters has consistently and wildly over-estimated an expected increase in wages: the OBR forecast for March this year was a wage rise of 4.3 percent. What happened has been a continuing real fall.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 23, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Real wages continue to fall in the UK, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin, CEP Real Wages Updates No.001, September 2014
Falling real wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Guardian
Low pay is breaking Britain's public finances: the evidence can't be denied

Permanent low pay threatens to overtake us, with the Treasury, hit by lower tax receipts, facing an ever-rising benefits bill.
On Wednesday Steve Machin, research director at the LSE's centre for economic performance, laid out to a meeting of economists the collected evidence on the nature of falling pay - and warned that this is beginning to look not like a slow recovery in wages, but a permanent, structural feature of the UK economy. He showed how the group-think of economic forecasters has consistently and wildly over-estimated an expected increase in wages: the OBR forecast for March this year was a wage rise of 4.3 percent. What happened has been a continuing real fall.

This article was published by the Guardian on October 23, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Real wages continue to fall in the UK, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin, CEP Real Wages Updates No.001, September 2014
Falling real wages, David Blanchflower and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

The Daily Telegraph
X factor over evidence: the failure of early years education

Article by Jo Blanden
As free nursery places for three year olds fail to deliver lasting educational benefits, Dr Jo Blanden argues we need to see a sensible approach to early years policy.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on October 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP Publications webpage

Britain News.Net
Vince Cables golf course plan fails to hook critics

Alluding to research from the London School of Economics, which showed more of Surrey if devoted to golf courses than housing, Dr Cable said if he was in a middle-income family struggling to find a home in the county, he would ask ''is a golf course sacred or are there better uses of the land?''

This article was published online by Britain News.Net on October 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications and films
Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis, LSE film. Also available to view on You Tube - Gearty Grilling: Paul Cheshire on Planning and the Housing Crisis
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Summer 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economic Research Centre (SERC) website

The Economist
The new school rules

The academies programme has transformed England's educational landscape. ... A separate study by Professor Machin and Andrew Eyles at the London School of Economics identified ''beneficial effects'' in schools becoming academies.

This article was published in The Economist on October 11, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Clarin
No va mas...quien ganara el Nobel de Economia?

Veronica Rappoport of the Centre for Economic Performance comments on her choice to be recipient(s) of this year's Nobel Prize for Economics:
''At some point should touch the area of economic growth: Romer, Aghion and perhaps Barro I would love a prize for. Holmstrom and Tirole.''

This article was published online by Clarin on October 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Veronica Rappoport webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage

Le Plus
Des ados partent faire le djihad en Syrie : comme le suicide, un comportement de fuite

Some researchers have studied the characteristics of happy people. They identified six factors which only concern the economy (unemployment), the others being: divorce rate, the level of trust between the people, the number of participants in non-religious organizations, the number of believers and the quality of government. (Reference: Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, 2005).

This article was published by Le Plus on October 8, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard. Penguin 2nd Edition, 2011
Details here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Happiness and Public Policy Research webpage

Times Higher Education
Domestic postgraduate places 'aided by overseas expansion'

Fees paid by growing numbers of overseas postgraduates studying in the UK have helped to subsidise additional places for domestic learners. That is among the findings of a new paper by Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London, and Richard Murphy, assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin, which analyses correlations between the increases in the numbers of British-born and overseas students in UK higher education institutions. ...The full research is detailed in a discussion paper from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, and is summarised in article published today in CentrePiece, the Centre's quarterly magazine.

This article was published by Times Higher Education on October 3, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
'Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education', Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1299, September 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The McKinsey Quarterly
Why management matters for productivity

Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

The McKinsey Quarterly
Why management matters for productivity

Article by John Dowdy and John Van Reenen
While government policy will play a key role, the actions of managers and their organizations will decisively influence the realization of global productivity potential in the years ahead.

This article was published online by the McKinsey Quarterly on September 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Management Practices Across Firms and Countries', Nicholas Bloom, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1109, December 2011
Management Practice and Productivity: Why they Matter, Nicholas Bloom, Stephen Dorgan, John Dowdy, Christos Genakos, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, July 2007

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures research webpage

Financial Times
Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

Financial Times
Pay pressure

Prof John van Reenen, director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, notes that average workers have been hit hardest. “Over time non-manual jobs have found their tasks taken over by computers and robots. Think of bank clerks and ATM machines,” he says. In Japan, it is the young who have been hurt worst as the traditional salaried jobs in big companies dwindled.

This article appeared in the Financial Times on 19 September 2014 link to article

Related Publications In brief - New technology: who wins, who loses? John Van Reenen, Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun, May 2014, Paper No' CEPCP418, CentrePiece 19 (1) Spring2014 pages: 6-7
The Distinct Effects of Information Technology and Communication Technology on Firm Organisation Nicholas Bloom, Luis Garicano, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen, CEP Discussion Paper No. 927, May 2009, Revised June 2013

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

The Independent
Spiralling costs of dementia 'being unfairly picked up by carers'

LSE professor of social policy Martin Knapp said many people with dementia and their families are essentially paying out £21,000 a year through the unpaid care provided by carers and covering the costs of social care.

This article appeared in the Independent on 10 September 2014 link to article

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing webpage

The Conversation
Why Finland, Korea and Czech Republic get the most bang for their educational buck

Article by Peter Dolton
There are around 1.3 billion children enrolled in primary and secondary schools worldwide. Each year, governments spend trillions of dollars on their education systems with the objective of educating children to the highest possible standard. Some governments use available budgets more efficiently than others. A new report which I co-authored called the Efficiency Index, published by London-based education consultancy GEMS Education Solutions, has highlighted which countries are using these most effectively to produce the best educational outcomes for their young people. Finland, Korea and the Czech Republic come out on top of the 30-country list.

This article was published online by The Conversation on September 5, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

CEP Visitor
Camille Terrier

Camille is visting the CEP from September 2014 until September 2015. She has joined the Education Programme. She is currently working on research projects focusing on biases in teachers’ grades and how it affects pupils' progress, teachers' recruitment and teachers’ assignment to schools through a centralized allocation mechanism. Camille completed her Master's degree in Economics at the Paris School of Economics.

The Times
Tiger moths lift children's exam results before birth

Tiger mothers predestine their children to do well at school even before they are born, research has suggested. Babies born to highly competitive women who believe that they have the power to shape their children's prospects go on to achieve better GCSE results, academics found. The research, by academics at the London School of Economics, was based on a study that tracks more than 10,000 children born in and around Bristol from 1991. Early in their pregnancy mothers were asked questions such as ''Do you believe things happen no matter what you try to do to stop them?'', and ''Does planning ahead make things turn out better?'' They were then interviewed annually until their children were five. Using their answers, the women were grouped by a psychological measure known as locus of control, which reflects whether people think outcomes are influenced by their own actions. The research plotted the GCSE results of teenagers whose mothers had shown high internal control tendencies in their twelfth week of pregnancy. Francesca Cornaglia, an economist at Queen Mary University, London, said: ''Other things constant, children whose mothers ranked in the top 25 per cent of the internal locus of control scale tended to obtain GCSE scores about 17 per cent higher than children of mothers in the bottom 25 per cent.''

This article was published in The Times on August 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill formation', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

Related Links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Nele Warrinner webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

EurAsia Review
Is there a 'taste for discrimination'? - Analysis

Article by Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier
This column presents evidence from a new test of taste-based discrimination. Examining hiring decisions in the English Fantasy Premier League, the authors do not find that employers discriminate based on race. One explanation for this is that good productivity measures minimise the opportunities for statistical discrimination, which according to studies drives the racial difference in market outcomes.

This article was published online by the EurAsian Review on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'What happens when employers are free to discriminate? Evidence from the English Barclays Premier Fantasy Football League', Alex Bryson and Arnaud Chevalier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1283, July 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

LSE News
Psychology of parenting: mother's personality measured during pregnancy predicts how well children perform in GCSEs

Babies born to mothers who hold a stronger belief that their fate is in their own hands and not down to luck tend to perform better in their GCSE exams 16 years later. That is the central finding of new research by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

This article was published by LSE News online on August 18, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Locus of Control and Its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill', Francesca Cornaglia, Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee and Nele Warrinnier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1293, August 2014

Related Links
Francesca Cornaglia webpage
Warn N. Lekfuangfu webpage
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Nele Warrinner webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

News
BBC Radio 4

Hilary Steedman discusses apprenticeships in Britain

This interview appeared on BBC Radio 4 on 8 August 2014 link to programme

Also on: BBC Radio Coventry and Warwickshire and BBC Northampton

Related Links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills webpage

LSE News online
Internet speed closely linked to property values

Londoners show a greater willingness than the rest of the country to pay for broadband, reflecting very high usage in the capital city for both work and personal reasons. ''Speed matters,'' says Gabriel Ahlfeldt, Associate Professor of Urban Economics and Land Development at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''The European Commission has set a target by 2020 that every European citizen will need access to at least 30 megabits per second and at least 50 per cent of households should subscribe to internet connections above 100 megabits per second.''

This press release was posted online on July 31, 2014
Link to press release here

Related publications
'Speed 2.0. Evaluating Access to Universal Digital Highways', Gabriel M. Ahfeldt, Pantelis Koutroumpis and Tommaso Valletti, SERC Discussion Paper no.161, July 2014

Related links
Gabriel Ahlfeldt webpage
SERC website

The Sunday Times (Scotland)
Freedom fighters offer a pig in a poke for the neediest of Scots

The SNP has been in government in a devolved Scotland for more than seven years. During that time it has had control over most of the levers of social justice, from education to healthcare, from local authority spending to housing. The fact that the party has chosen to concentrate on constitutional reform rather than, to take one example, school reform, is their decision and not Westminster's. If anything is instrumental in turning around people's lives it is education - proof of which is now being seen in England's inner cities. Here, there are no plans for the revolution that is rescuing failing schools south of the border, and there remain ''deep levels of inequality... particularly between pupils from different socio-economic groups'', claims the LSE study 'Education in a Devolved Scotland'.

This article was published in The Sunday Times (Scotland) on July 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Education in a Devolved Scotland: A Quantitative Analysis', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.30, May 2013.
Education in Scotland: performance in a devolved policy area, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Independent
If Hadza nomads get by on 14 hours' work a week, why can't we?

A substantial literature already surrounds the UK ''productivity puzzle'', whereby post-recession output and employment have risen while national productivity markedly drops: $42.1 contribution to GDP per hour worked in 2013, compared with a eurozone average of $43.7 and a G7 rate of $48.4. Explanations for the plunge range from the misallocation of resources and the post-crash investment famine to, in several studies, the long-term fall in real wages. Professor John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics argues in a paper that ''low wages and weak investment mean a big fall in the amount of effective capital per worker and this accounts for most of the fall in labour productivity''.

This article was published in The Independent on July 26, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
The UK Productivity and Jobs Puzzle: Does the Answer Lie in Labour Market Flexibility?, Joao Paulo Pessoa and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Special Paper No.31, June 2013

Related Links
Joao Paulo Pessoa webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation webpage

libcom.org
Authoritarianism, work and therapy

Yesterday the Independent featured an interview with British economist Richard Layard. The article's headline features Layard proclaiming ''that money is not the only thing affecting peoples happiness''. Layard has written two books in which he claims that not enough is done for the mental wellbeing of citizens despite the massive costs to the economy. Layard is one of the champions of the happiness index that David Cameron has previously voiced support for.

This article was posted online by libcom.org on July 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Happiness and Public Policy research webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Telegraph
Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

The Telegraph
Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

The Telegraph
Does Germany rule your world?

This article was first published on January 28, 2013 and has been republished after Germany beat Brazil 7-1 in the World Cup semi-final
Second, it is the view of most economists that Germany has been the biggest winner out the euro, and that being part of the euro - rather than keeping its old currency the Deutschmark - has been an enormous advantage. When it joined, the exchange rate was set at EURO 1 = DM1.96, which most people at the time thought was a fair rate. But it is estimated by the European Commission itself that since then, Germany's real exchange rate has fallen by nearly 20 per cent. In other words, if Germany had kept the Deutschmark, the value of its goods would have been 20 per cent more expensive to any potential customer. Being part of the shared euro, kept weak by struggling neighbours, has helped it drag down the cost of its goods. As a result, German cars, kettles and shoelaces suddenly became far cheaper to buy. This argument has long been pushed by Nobel prize-winning economist Paul Krugman, no less, who has emerged one of the chief Germany-bashers. But a number of other Nobel prize-winning economists, such as Joseph Stiglitz and Christopher Pissarides, have recently joined him in voicing criticisms of the inherent problems of a powerful northern Europe, led by Germany, and a weak southern Europe all using the same currency. Germany, they say, urgently has to readdress its serious imbalances. The most obvious method would be to make its goods more expensive, by pushing up its workers' wages.

This article was published online by The Telegraph on July 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macro Programme webpage

Dagen
Debattinnlegget er skrevet av Kåre Eriksen, kommunikasjonsrådgiver i Digni

Men det finnes grenser. Professor Richard Layard ved London School of Economics har funnet ut at tilfredshet og lykke stiger dramatisk med okt kjopekraft - inntil man nar en arsinntekt pa rundt 20.000 dollar, eller rundt 120.000 kroner. Etter dette gir ikke okte inntekter saerlig utslag pa lykkeskalaen.
But there are limits. Professor Richard Layard at the London School of Economics has found that contentment and happiness rises dramatically with increased purchasing power-until one reaches an annual income of around 20,000 dollars, or around 120,000 dollars. After this, it does not provide any increased revenues, in particular, reflected on the happiness index.

This article was published online by Dagen on July 7, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Happiness: Lessons from a New Science, Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition, 2011
Details

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Sunday Express
'Use green belt to fix housing land shortage'

The Government's Help to Buy scheme was also helping first time buyers move into the market, she added but Prof. Cheshire rejected the measures as ''putting fingers in dykes''. ''The help to buy scheme is simply a recipe for increasing house prices. It has no other effect because supply is so inelastic,'' he said. ''The crisis in our housing market is absolutely and undeniably about lack of supply. The most important single factor to this is the planning system and the restriction on development for 60 years. There is no alternative but to reconsider greenbelt land. We have to increase supply of housing land and that cannot be done on brownfield sites alone because there is surprisingly few of them and they are not in the right places were the demand for housing is.''

This article was published in The Sunday Express on July 6, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.
Turning houses into gold: the failure of British planning, Paul Cheshire. LSE British Politics and Policy blog, posted May 7, 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Spatial Economics Research Centre (SERC) website

David Nicholsons Blob
Ambitious about autism employment summit speech 3rd of July 2014

According to research from the London School of Economics published in June of this year in the Journal of American Medical Association of Paediatrics the cost of autism to the UK economy is £32 billion.

This article was published online in the David Nicholsons Blog on July 3, 2014
Link to blog piece here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Conversation UK
Drop the negative spin on kids who start school bilingual - they are a rich resource for the future

There are now more than 1.1 million children in our schools whose first language ''is known or believed to be other than English'' according to the latest government figures. ... Chinese students are our highest performing group and the presence of so many Polish students has helped improve the position of many of our Catholic schools in the league tables, as shown by a study carried out by the LSE in 2012.

This article was published online by the Conversation on July 1, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
Thursday 3 July
Epoch Times
Drop the negative spin on kids who start school bilingual - they are a rich resource for the future

Related publications
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: Language barriers? The impact of non-native English speakers in the classroom, Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 1, Spring 2012
'Non-Native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education website

Daily Express
Why Prince Charles has got it right on grammar schools

“Comprehensive schools are a social experiment which went so horribly wrong that no party is quite brave enough to confess to its error. An LSE study revealed that people born in 1958, most of whom went to secondary school when grammar schools were still around, were more likely to move up the earnings ladder relative to their parents than were people born in 1970, most of whom went to comprehensives.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 1 July 2014 link to article

Related publications
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility Jo Blanden, in CentrePiece 13 (3) Winter 2009
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Full paper here from CentrePiece 10 (1) Spring 2005
More details on the research discussed here are in Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America by Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin - a report supported by the Sutton Trust


Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian
The scandal of common mental illnesses left untreated

The crisis in question is one of mental health, yet what our politicians propose to do about it remains unclear. If they’re in need of help, they could always start with a careful reading of a new book by the economist Richard Layard and clinical psychologist David Clark. At the heart of Thrive: The Power of Evidence-Based Psychological Therapies is a bewildering conundrum. Mental illness is extremely common: one in three people will experience a problem at some point during their lifetime; in any one year, 19% of us will suffer from an anxiety disorder, 13% from a substance problem, and 7% from depression. If personal misery on this scale isn’t sufficient to move politicians to action, an annual cost to the exchequer of approximately £28bn (not counting NHS costs) might be expected to do the trick. Yet most people receive no medical help for their conditions, and of the minority that do get treatment, very few receive the most effective form.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 1 July 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Thrive: the Power of Evidence Based Psychological Therapies Richard Layard, David M Clark, Penguin, July 2014

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
David Clark webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Vox.Eu
Through the looking glass: CEO pay in China's listed companies

Publicly traded companies are the engine behind China's growth, which raises the question of how CEO compensation works under an interventionist state. This column presents an analysis of executive compensation in China and a comparison to the West. Chinese listed firms have incentive structures similar to those of the US; in this case, effective compensation policies seem to transcend political boundaries.

This article was published online by Vox.Eu on June 24, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'CEO Incentive Contracts in China: Why Does City Location Matter?', Alex Bryson, John Forth and Minghai Zhou, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1192, February 2013

Related Links
Alex Bryson webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Daily Mail
Cameron pledges to fight UK's dementia timebomb

Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics, said discovering a treatment to delay the onset of dementia by just 36 months would save the country as much as £5billion a year. Mr Cameron will claim there is a 'market failure', with scientists and drug companies having no incentive to prioritise dementia research.

This article was published in the Daily Mail on June 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related Links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Guardian
Autism costs UK £32bn a year, analysis shows

Autism costs the US and UK economies $175bn (£104bn) and £32bn a year respectively, more than any other medical condition and greater than the cost of cancer, strokes and heart disease combined, according to an economic analysis of the condition's impact. Professor Martin Knapp, from the London School of Economics who co-authored the study, said: ''Autism is more common than perhaps people realise - it's more than 1 percent of the population. Also the impact that it has is across the lifespan, particularly for people with autism and learning difficulties, also known as low-functioning autism. Those individuals would need quite a lot of care and support from a pretty early age. You're talking about 60 to 70 years of support for people with this level of need.''

This article was published by The Guardian on June 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Martin Knapp webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

BBC (Web)
Most teachers 'back pay by results'

However Richard Murphy, a researcher at the LSE's Centre for the Economics of Education, said evidence suggested "a teacher who is consistently raising the test scores of pupils is much more likely to be a highly effective teacher".

This article appeared in the Guardian on 6 June 2014 link to article

Related Links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills webpage

City AM
Britain's housing crisis will morph into catastrophe if politicians don't change, by Paul Cheshire

THE HOUSING crisis – worst in London, but bad across Britain – is fundamentally driven by lack of supply. For the past five years, we have been building fewer houses than in any peacetime period since before World War One. But house building has been on a downwards trend since the 1960s. Reasonable estimates suggest the shortfall in England has been 1.6m to 2.3m houses between 1994 and 2012. Moreover, too many of those we have built have not been in locations where demand is highest. We persistently build houses where they are relatively most affordable and job prospects are relatively worst.

This article appeared in City AM on 4 June 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece - Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website

The Guardian
Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

The Guardian
Talking therapies are better than pills, but you have to find the right one

When the Depression Report was published by the Centre for Economic Performance's mental health policy group in 2006, it quantified the effects of that over-medicalisation for the first time. Talking therapies, particularly CBT, could be shown to be more effective than medication in cases of mild to moderate depression, both in getting people back to work and preventing recurrence. National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) guidelines already stated that talking therapies should be offered before drugs; the problem was that there weren't enough qualified therapists. The Depression Report showed clearly that investment in making CBT and similar therapies more widely available would be better for the economy in the long run than handing out pills.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 28 May 2014 link to article

Related Publications
The Depression Report: A New Deal for Depression and Anxiety Disorders The Centre for Economic Performance's Mental Health Policy group, June 2006
Mental Illness and Unhappiness Dan Chisholm, Richard Layard, Vikram Patel, Shekhar Saxena, September 2013 Paper No' CEPDP1239

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Times Higher Education
UK University funding: don't copy the Australians

Doubling the monthly repayment for those likely to be struggling to save for a deposit on a home or to pay for the rise in their rail season ticket is hardly likely to be a popular policy. And creating such a ''cliff edge'' in repayments is likely to create a range of perverse incentives and distortionary effects in the labour market, suppressing wages. These seem pretty desperate measures to adopt. As London School of Economics researchers Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy stated in The Guardian last month in response to Hepi's report, if the UK government really wants to lower the RAB charge, it could do so by lowering fees, or it could reduce it to zero by abolishing fees altogether. As the Hepi report points out, a significant factor in Australia's lower RAB charge (around 25 per cent) is its lower tuition fees, which result in lower student debt.

This article was published in The Times Higher on May 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage

i (the paper for today)
The right choice: pros and cons of further study

A higher qualification comes with lots of benefits, but weigh up the costs first to make sure it will be worth the investment. A Bachelors degree is no longer a passport to a career in some employment sectors. As an increasing number of graduates chase a limited number of jobs, a higher qualification is often expected or demanded by employers at entry level. The Postgraduate Premium, based on research by the Sutton Trust - led by the London School of Economics and University of Surrey - shows that 11 per cent of the UK workforce aged 26-60, hold a postgraduate qualification.

This article was published in i (independent) on May 21, 2014
Link to pdf of the article here.

Related publications
The Postgraduate Premium: Revisiting Trends in Social Mobility and Educational Inequalities in Britain and America, Joanne Lindley and Stephen Machin, Sutton Trust Report, February 2013

Related links
Stephen Machin
webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Conversation
‘4,000 down, 20,000 to go' – the academies drive gathers pace

Meanwhile, justification for rapid academisation is scant. A 2009 report by LSE academics Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson signals there was little proof that New Labour's academies raised the attainment of poorer students more than similar schools.

This article was published online by the Conversation on May 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
Academy schools and pupil performance, Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson. Article in CentrePiece 14 (1) Spring 2009
This article summarises 'Public and Private Schooling Initiatives in England' by Stephen Machin and Joan Wilson, a chapter in School Choice International: Exploring Public-Private Partnerships edited by Rajashri Chakrabarti and Paul E. Peterson, MIT Press, 2008. Details

Related Links
Steve Machin webpage
Labour Markets webpage

The Daily Telegraph
Enough is enough, we need higher interest rates now

In the 1970s and 80s, some 4.3m new homes were built in Britain. In the subsequent two decades, the numbers plummeted to 2.7m. To stabilise affordability in the areas of the country people have to live and work — twice as many houses were built in Doncaster and Barnsley, where prices have been falling steeply, in the five years to 2013 than in Oxford and Cambridge, where prices are rising strongly — requires return to previous levels of house building. As an economy, we’ve not been building enough housing for 30 years or more. I take these statistics from an article by Paul Cheshire, a professor of economic geography at the London School of Economics, in the LSE’s CentrePiece magazine.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 May 2014 link to article

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning Paul Cheshire. Article from CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website

The Daily Telegraph
EU elections 2014: Is immigration good for Britain?

Last year, the Centre for Economic Performance, a think-tank, found that the arrival of Polish children in British schools had helped lift their native classmates’ results. The researchers said one explanation is that Polish children’s stronger work ethic encourages their British peers.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 12 May 2014 link to article

Related Publication
'Non-native Speakers of English in the Classroom: What are the Effects on Pupil Performance? by Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012


Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Yahoo! Notizie (Italy)
Romania, mobilità e capitali in Europa

La mobilita dei lavoratori in Europa e notevolmente aumentata dal 2010, dopo un brusco calo dovuto alla crisi. Sono i Paesi del sud Europa che stanno facendo registrare un vero e proprio esodo. Gran parte dei migranti in cerca di lavoro sono giovani con alti livelli d'istruzione. Un fenomeno che crea problemi nei rispettivi Paesi di provenienza. Cosi, esaminate le recenti ricerche sulla migrazione qualificata e l'impatto sui paesi di origine e di destinazione, ecco cosa ci racconta Marco Manacorda, professore di Economia alla Queen Mary Univeristy. ''Quando guardiamo gli effetti della mobilita qualificata rispetto al mercato del lavoro locale, contrariamente alle teorie economiche standard, che prevedono un danno per i nativi, cio non accade. Viene registrato invece un costo per i paesi di origine, soprattutto se questi hanno investito nell'educazione''.
Romania and Capital Mobility in Europe
The mobility of workers in Europe has significantly increased from 2010, after a sharp drop due to the crisis. Are the southern European Countries that are making a real exodus. Most of the migrants in search of work are young people with high levels of education. A phenomenon that creates problems in their countries of origin. So, you look at recent research on migration and the impact on countries of origin and destination, here's what Marco Manacorda, Professor of Economics at Queen Mary University says: "When we look at the effects of the qualified mobility compared to the local labour market, contrary to standard economic theory, involving damage to the natives, this doesn't happen. A cost is recorded for the countries of origin, especially if they have invested in education ". This article was published online on Yahoo!Notizie (Italy) on May 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Marco Manacorda CEP Publications webpage

Planning resource
Housing affordability crisis blamed on green belt policy

Green belt polices that aim to keep ''the urban unwashed out of the Home Counties'' are causing a housing affordability crisis, according to a London School of Economics (LSE) professor. Britain's booming house prices have been caused by ''decades of planning policies that constrain the supply of houses and land'', according to a study by Paul Cheshire, professor emeritus of economic geography at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published by Planningresource online on May 2, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Turning Houses into Gold: the Failure of British Planning, Paul Cheshire. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 1, Spring 2014.

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
SERC website

The Guardian
Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage

The Guardian
Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage

The Guardian
Funding UK higher education: why we shouldn't copy Australia

Adopting the Australian tuition fee system could result in poorer students staying away from expensive courses say Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy in a blog article for the Guardian newspaper.

They say it is not clear why the UK would want to emulate the Australian system. Charging fee levels according to how much one might earn in the future, rather than according to the cost of actually providing the degree, could exacerbate socioeconomic inequalities if debt-averse students (usually from poorer backgrounds) choose to study low-priced subjects that will go on to deliver lower wages.

There have been murmurings of a similar system in the UK, but with fees linked to the institution attended rather than the subject studied. Such a system would suffer from the same kinds of problems, with debt-averse students potentially staying away from high-fee elite institutions.

This article was published in The Guardian on April 28, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education research network webpage

Macleans.ca
Italy's stay-at-home kids

48 per cent of European adults between 18 and 30 now live with their parents, an increase from 44 per cent at the onset of the economic crisis in 2007. But the highest number is in Italy, with 79 per cent. That's up from about 60 per cent a few years ago, according to a separate report. ... In a 2005 paper written for the Centre for Economic Policy Research [sic] in the UK, economists Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti wrote that while high youth unemployment (now at 42 per cent) plays a role in these living arrangements, the main factor is that Italian parents want their children to live with them. The parents essentially bribe their children to stay home by feeding them, doing their laundry and giving them money in exchange for care and companionship.

This article was published online by Macleans.ca (Canada) on April 27, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure. Why Do Most Italian Youths Live With Their Parents?, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.536, June 2002
Mamma's boys? Why most young Italian men live with their parents, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 3, Winter 2005
Why Do Most Italian Youths Live with their Parents? Intergenerational Transfers and Household Structure, Marco Manacorda and Enrico Moretti, Journal of the European Economic Association, 4: 800-829, June 2006

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

BBC News - Business
Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
UK Wired News

Related publications
'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
Link to report here
Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nicholas Oulton webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

BBC News - Business
Move over, GDP: How should you measure a country's value?

There have been several other attempts at complementing or replacing GDP. Sir Gus O'Donnell explains the impact wellbeing research is having on policy. The UN implemented the human development index, the OECD has a ''better life index'' and even the UK's own Office for National Statistics measures national wellbeing. Recently, Sir Gus O'Donnell, a former senior civil servant in the UK, published a wellbeing and policy report, which investigated the main economic, social and personal drivers of happiness. ... But there are those who resist the idea that GDP cannot map welfare. Nick Oulton, of the London School of Economics, argues that economic growth can be a good measure of a country's wellbeing. ''It won't solve all problems, but a rise in wealth can lead to declines in infant mortality, increased life expectancy, and people getting healthier because they can afford to eat more food,'' he says.

This article was published online by BBC News - Business on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
UK Wired News

Related publications
'Wellbeing and Policy', Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, Legatum Institute Report, March 2014
Link to report here
Nicholas Oulton's CEP publications

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Nicholas Oulton webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Canberra Times
ECB to blame for eurozone

Professor Luis Garicano, from the London School of Economics, said the economic models used to predict inflation seem to be breaking down, leading to serial misjudgments. ''They need to take very serious action,'' he told the Financial Times.

This article was published online by the Canberra Times (Australia) on April 3, 2014
Link to article here

Also in:
Sydney Morning Herald Link to article here
Melbourne Age Link to article here
Republica.com Link to article here

Related publications
El dilema de Espana, Luis Garicano. Book published in January 2014.
Details.

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

The Economist (Online)
Happy Now?

The commission’s authors (who include Richard Layard, an academic who has long supported more use of well-being indices in policy), favour the second measure of general satisfaction with life. More comprehensive cross-country measurements, they suggest, might help governments adopt useful innovations from other countries. Many considerations turn out to be widely shared across cultures. Work matters more for psychological reasons than pecuniary ones. Trust in one’s local community figures highly as a source of mental ease. Physical environments and good urban planning also figure highly . Emotional health might be enhanced by inculcating virtues like resilience more energetically at school.

This article appeared in the Economist on 27 March 2014 link to article

Related Publications
Wellbeing and Policy, Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 Link to report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Gus O'Donnell webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Bloomberg News
Modern Rosie the Riveter a path to women's higher pay

In the UK, the majority of new apprentices in 2012 were women. Still, much of the growth for women in the UK system has been in lower-wage levels of apprenticeships, which include service occupations, said Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at the London School of Economics and Political Science. ''It's a bit discouraging at the moment,'' she said. ''If women were moving into higher-level apprenticeships, their earnings would be much higher.''

This article was published by Bloomberg News on March 26, 2014
Link to article here

Also in
HeraldNet on March 27, 2014
Women move into trades in search of higher pay
NorthJersey.com on March 30, 2014
Modern Rosie the Riveter a Path to U.S. Women's Higher Pay

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

Free Malaysia Today
Study: ‘Mid-life crisis' is real

The study was completed with assistance from the University of Warwick and the London School of Economics, and published as a working paper by the German-based Institute for the Study of Labor. Researchers analyzed data from “nationally representative” surveys in Australia, Britain and Germany. “What is interesting is the consistency of the results in all of the three countries we examined. Human happiness hits the lowest point around the ages of 40 to 42,” Dr Cheng said. “Indeed all the more intriguing is that the U-shape pattern has been recently observed in research on great apes. Perhaps we are more similar than we think?”

This article appeared on Free Malaysia Today on 21 March 2014 link to article

Also in:
Huffington Post Canada link to article
New York Daily News link to article
CNBC link to article

Related Publications
Nattavudh Powdthavee’s CEP Publications

Related Links
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Free Malaysia Today
Study: ‘Mid-life crisis' is real

The study was completed with assistance from the University of Warwick and the London School of Economics, and published as a working paper by the German-based Institute for the Study of Labor. Researchers analyzed data from “nationally representative” surveys in Australia, Britain and Germany. “What is interesting is the consistency of the results in all of the three countries we examined. Human happiness hits the lowest point around the ages of 40 to 42,” Dr Cheng said. “Indeed all the more intriguing is that the U-shape pattern has been recently observed in research on great apes. Perhaps we are more similar than we think?”

This article appeared on Free Malaysia Today on 21 March 2014 link to article

Also in:
Huffington Post Canada link to article
New York Daily News link to article
CNBC link to article

Related Publications
Nattavudh Powdthavee’s CEP Publications

Related Links
Nattavudh Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage

BBC online
Vicar or publican - which jobs make you happy?

A report out on Thursday from the former head of the civil service, Sir Gus O'Donnell commissioned by the Legatum Institute, explains the impact wellbeing research is already having on policy and argues for more of it in the future.It confirms what the chancellor must know - that economic growth is indeed good for social wellbeing. But there are other areas of state activity that might be given greater priority if politicians want to improve the nation's happiness. An emphasis on improving mental health is one, ensuring towns and cities include plenty of places where residents can meet and interact is another. There is evidence that an "active" welfare system encouraging people into work is better for wellbeing than a "passive" safety-net approach.

This article appeared on BBC Online on 20 March 2014 link to article

Related Publication
Wellbeing and Policy Gus O'Donnell, Angus Deaton, Martine Durand, David Halpern and Richard Layard, March 2014 link to report

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Gus O'Donnell webpage
Wellbeing webpage

The Conversation
Budget 2014: experts respond

Chancellor George Osborne has unveiled his fourth budget. As the day develops, our panel of experts here give their take on what this budget means for the economy, healthcare, education, the environment and, of course, ordinary members of the public.

Jo Blanden, Senior Lecturer in Economics and Deputy Head of School, University of Surrey and Associate of the Centre for Economic Performance
The BBC has summarised today's budget as about ''pensions, savings and bingo'' and indeed there does seem to be a strong focus on the older generation. Politically this makes sense for the Conservatives as older, wealthier groups are more likely to consider voting Tory. But economically the group which has lost out most in the aftermath of the recession is the young with 20 percent unemployment among the 18-24 year olds and average earnings reduced by 8 percent for those in their 20s.

Ironically intergenerational inequalities were eloquently identified by Conservative Minister David Willets even before the recession started in his well-received book The Pinch. The new pension arrangements are set to net the Treasury a tidy sum, the hope is it will spend it on programmes to ease the squeeze on Generation Y.

John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance and Professor of Economics, London School of Economics
George Osborne boasted of Britain's economic strength with raised growth forecast of 2.7 percent this year. But the budget small print admits that this growth only gets national income up where it was in 2008. Under the Chancellor we have suffered the worst squeeze on wages and the slowest recovery for over a century. The government made a huge policy error by accelerating austerity four years ago. Slashing public investment when output was depressed derailed the recovery - it is still a third lower than before the crisis.

Measures on housing policy create a feel-good factor for homeowners that might help boost the Tory vote, but it puts the taxpayer on the hook for huge debts in the decades to come. And Budget benefits to pensioners are good for grabbing the grey vote, but they have been relatively shielded from the turmoil of the last 5 years. The increases in personal allowances are welcome, though the main beneficiaries will not be the very poor. The budget has some tinkering with taxes to stimulate investment in a desperate attempt to deal with the fact that business investment remains depressed. But the cause is again Osborne-omics: the slashing of government investment, depressed demand due to austerity and the failure to sort out the banks.

For decent growth, jobs and pay, we deserve much better than this.

This article was published online by The Conversation on March 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Il Sole 24 Ore
Davos, ecco i 214 giovani leader del futuro. La metà sono donne. Solo due gli italiani

Era andata meglio nel 2013, quando il Forum di Davos aveva incluso tra gli Young Leader quattro ''italians'': Fabrizio Campelli di Deutsche Bank, Silvia Console Battilana della Stanford University, l'allora vice-ministro del Lavoro e delle Politiche Sociali Michel Martone, Martina Viarengo del Graduate Institute di Ginevra ed London School of Economics. Mentre, nel 2012, tra i (due) connazionali in lista compariva un ''major of Florence'' sulla buona strada per altre cariche: Matteo Renzi.
Davos, here are the young leaders of the future 2014. Half are women. Only two Italian
Had gone better in 2013, when the Forum in Davos had included among the Young Leaders four ''italians'': Fabrizio Campelli of Deutsche Bank, Silvia Console Battilana at Stanford University, the then Deputy Minister of labour and Social Affairs Michel Martone, Martina Viarengo of the Graduate Institute in Geneva and London School of Economics. While, in 2012, of the (two) fellow in the list appeared a ''major of Florence'' on track for other offices: Matteo Renzi.

This article was published by Il Sole 24Ore on March 12, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Martina Viarengo webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Martina Viarengo CEP publications webpage

LSE British Politics and Policy blog
Towns and cities can be trapped in wrong locations

When thinking about policy responses, it is worth looking at the past to see how historical events can leave cities trapped in locations that are far from ideal. We have done that in a study that compares the evolution of two initially similar urban networks following a historical calamity that wiped out one, while leaving the other largely intact.

This LSE British Politics and Policy blog was posted online on March 6, 2014
Link to blog article here

Related publications
Can cities be trapped in bad locations?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch. Artice in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2013/14
'Resetting the Urban Network 117-2012', Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1248, November 2013
Can history leave towns struck in places with bad locational fundamentals?, Guy Michaels and Ferdinand Rauch, Vox, 08/12/2013

Related links
Guy Michaels webpage
Ferdinand Rauch webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Guardian
University education: at £9,000 per year, parents begin to question its value

Parents are struggling to reconcile conflicting views about the value of higher education for their children: more than half believe that fees of up to £9,000 a year represent poor value for money, yet a majority still regard a traditional university education as the best route to a chosen career, according to a YouGov poll. Dr Gill Wyness, of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, said the YouGov poll highlighted ''a lot of scepticism for forgivable reasons from parents'', but also pointed to the ''surprising'' level of support for university study for its own sake and not merely as a step to a career. She said: ''There are a lot of near contradictions, where people are saying they can't afford for their children to go to university and yet they are expecting them to go. It's a puzzling time for people.''

This article was published by the Guardian on February 26, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Gill Wyness CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
The Economics of Higher Education website

BBC2
Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

BBC2
Horizon TV: How you make decisions

Professor Paul Dolan featured in Episode 9 of the BBC2 programme - Horizon. The episode was looking at how people really make decisions.
Every day you make thousands of decisions, big and small, and behind all them is a powerful battle in your mind, pitting intuition against logic. This conflict affects every aspect of your life - from what you eat to what you believe, and especially to how you spend your money. And it turns out that the intuitive part of your mind is a lot more powerful than you may realise.

The BBC2 Horizon episode was broadcast on February 24, 2014
Link to BBC iplayer here

Related links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage
Paul Dolan CEP publications webpage

The Economic Voice
Favoured management strategy of UK businesses ‘fatally flawed'

A top crop of UK managers voted for the best article, as the must-read piece of research to come out of British business schools over the last year. An article by Professors Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun and John Van Reenen - all of the Centre for Economic Performance - had their research, asking whether management really works, shortlisted.

Articles were submitted to the competition by academics which were then reviewed and rated online by CMI members. Those with the highest ratings were then assessed by CMI's Academic Advisory Council, a committee of leading UK academics, who selected the following as the top five. 'Does Management Really Work? How three essential practices can address even the most complex global problems' by Professor Nicholas Bloom, Professor of Economics at Stanford University, Professor Raffaella Sadun, Assistant Professor at Harvard Business School, Professor John Van Reenen, Director of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics and Political Science.

This article was published by The Economic Voice on February 19, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
'Does Management Really Work? How Three Essential Practices Can Address Even the Most Complex Global Problems', Nicholas Bloom, Raffaela Sadun and John Van reenen. Article in Winning Ideas. The Management Articles of the Year. CMI - Chartered Management Institute, February 2014.

Related links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Management Practices and Organisational Structures Research webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

New Republic.com
The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage

New Republic.com
The Silicon Valley labor scandals prove minimum wage hikes don't cost jobs

The labor economist Alan Manning, in his book Monopsony in Motion (first chapter), argues that these two elements together means that employers have a small amount of market power over each job out there. This power is like a monopoly power, but the power doesn't come from the size or concentration of the firm but instead from the difficulties of the search.

This article was published online by New Republic.com on February 14, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'The Real Thin Theory: Monopsony in Modern Labour Markets', Alan Manning, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.564, May 2003
Monopsony in Motion: Imperfect Competition in Labor Markets, Alan Manning. Published by Princeton University Press, 2005. Details

Related Links
Alan Manning webpage
Labour Markets webpage

The Conversation
Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Conversation
Why the government shouldn't privatise the student loan book

The announcement that the government intends to sell off part of the student loan book is perhaps no surprise, but it is bad economics. Debt from student loans is currently a groaning £46.6 billion on the government's balance sheet. The government has already made very clear its intent to further privatise the UK's higher education system. The argument is simple. They want to convert an extended stream of income from student loan repayments - which are paid by graduates at a small proportion of their income each month, thus drip-feeding repayment to the government for up to 30 years into the future - into a one-time payment now. This would immediately lower the public debt number. It is a simple move of income in the future to income today. But the truth is that selling the student loans book in this fashion is bad for students, bad for taxpayers, and may even undermine the entire ethos of the higher education finance system.

This article was published by The Conversation on February 10, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

SERC Conference: 15th-16th May 2014 LSE
Call for Papers from Postgraduate Research

The Spatial Economics Research Centre was launched in April 2008 to provide high quality independent research on why some regions, cities and communities prosper more than others. It mobilises international expertise and provides information for policy makers to enhance their capacity to diagnose and tackle existing spatial inequalities.

One significant part of its mission is to contribute to capacity-building in this field by working and networking with young researchers. To pursue this aim, the Centre’s annual conference in May is held over two days, with the first half of the programme devoted to presentations based on current / recent PhD research, and the second to papers by SERC staff and affiliates, relating to the Centre’s own research. These sessions have been very successful in the past in terms of participation and feedback.

Submissions are invited now for papers to be presented in the PhD / young researcher sessions. Topics should reflect SERC’s broad research agenda and relate to one (or more) of its five programme areas:

• The scale and nature of UK spatial disparities
• The causes of place-based effects
• Housing and land markets
• The structure and evolution of the spatial economy
• Spatial economic policy


Successful applicants will be invited to attend both days of the conference. Financial support for authors of those papers selected for presentation (covering economy travel and budget hotel) will be provided by SERC. The choice of papers will be based on 500 word abstracts which should be sent via email by 28th February to Linda Cleavely [l.f.cleavely@lse.ac.uk], together with information about the author’s affiliations, status and date of PhD submission (if awarded in the last three years). Each presenter will also be expected to serve as a discussant. Authors will be notified of decisions by 10th March. If your paper is accepted, deadline for full paper submissions is 2nd May.

If you require further information please contact Teresa Schlueter [T.J.Schlueter @lse.ac.uk]

For more information about SERC and the Annual Conference see http://www.spatialeconomics.ac.uk

The Melbourne Newsroom
Lottery wins make people lurch to the right

— was conducted by Professor Nattavudh Powdthavee (University of Melbourne and the London School of Economics and Professor Andrew Oswald (University of Warwick), and released as a Warwick Working...

This article appeared in The Melbourne Newsroom on 6 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing webpage

All About Living With Life
Pursuit of happiness

.....things like this can really improve our lives. The movement, founded by LSE professor Richard Layard and Dr Anthony Seldon, aims to create positive social change, and comes as the government prepares to publish findings this autumn on its proposed...

This artilce appeared in All about Living with Life on 6 February 2014 link to article

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing webpage

CEP Visitor
Monica Langella

Monica is a Visitor to the Centre for Economic performance from January until December 2014. She is now a PhD student at the Graduate School of Economics and Management (GSEM) - joint programme of the Universities of Padova, Verona, and Ca' Foscari, Venice. Her research interests include labour economics, education, econometrics, and policy evaluation.

Vox
Lessons from the economics of crime

Article by Stephen Machin and Olivier Marie
In many settings, criminal behaviour can be analysed just like any other economic decision-making process, namely - as the outcome of individual choices influenced by perceived consequences. This column explains the advantages of adopting an economic approach to understanding crime. Furthermore, criminal law and crime-prevention programmes can be evaluated using the same normative techniques applied to health, education, and environmental regulation.

This article was published online by Vox on January 30, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Lessons from the economics of crime, Philip J. Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie and Giovanni Mastrobuoni. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 3, Winter 2013/14
This paper has been published as: Lessons from the Economics of Crime (2013) edited by Philip J Cook, Stephen Machin, Olivier Marie and Giovanni Mastrobuoni. Published by MIT Press, October. Details

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olivier Marie webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News
‘Wind turbines are slashing house prices by 20% in St Enoder parish'

property trickier to sell.” A nationwide study published last week by the London School of Economics (LSE) reviewed more than a million homes located near large wind farms over a 12-year period, and found their property values fell by 11 per cent...

This article appeared in National Wind Watch: Wind Energy News on 30 January 2014 link to article

Related Links
Draft report link
Steve Gibbons webpage

British Politics and Policy at LSE
Blog - Does school spending matter? Early years investment may offer higher returns – but the returns erode unless topped up during later phases of childhood

Would increasing the share of Britain's national income devoted to education make much of a difference? And what is the ideal balance of spending between early years, primary and secondary education? Steve Gibbons and Sandra McNally review the research evidence on the causal effects of school resources on pupil outcomes.

The article was published in the British Politics and Policy at London School of Economics blog on January 22, 2014
Link to article here

Related publications
Does school spending matter?, Steve Gibbons and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 2, Autumn 2013
'The Effects of Resources Across School Phases: A Summary of Recent Evidence', Stephen Gibbons and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1226, June 2013

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

guardian.co.uk
Education in brief: the disappearing headteacher and other mysteries

Meanwhile, the DfE document still quotes approvingly from the 2010 report by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit from the London School of Economics, which highlighted improvements in academies opened under Labour, even after Machin has called on ministers to stop using it in reference to academies under this government.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on January 16, 2014
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Changing School Autonomy: Academy Schools and their Introduction to England's Education', Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.123, April 2011
Note on Academy School Policy, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, Centre for Economic Policy Analysis, July 2010
Academy schools: who benefits? by Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. In CentrePiece 15 (2) Autumn 2010

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education (CEE) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

AOL UK
UK visa 'auction' for well-off foreigners planned

the Government's Migration Advisory Committee, said "it may very well be that we should be letting people in if they endow a Cambridge college, a major teaching hospital or the London School of Economics with 10 million". Not popular More than 500 'investor' visa were approved in the second quarter of 2013. A recent poll, the British Social Attitudes Survey

This article appeared on AOL.co.uk on 9 January 2014 link to article

Related Links
David Metcalf link
Labour Markets webpage link

City A.M.
As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?

Luis Garicano's response to the question: ''As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?'' is ''NO''
Management is not about to disappear. As long as decisions need to be taken to steer companies and business units, there will be two choices: endless meetings, or assigning the decision to a boss. Think of Apple's decision to introduce the iPhone in 2007. From 2004, it had to decide where to focus its resources. A new TV? A tablet computer? Or a phone? Making such a decision without a boss is extremely hard. It involves multiple units, from design to sales, and means changing the jobs of thousands of people. Making such a decision by committee would involve endless lobbying and politicking. Even some of the practices that seem most rigid and bureaucratic, such as endless approval chains for new projects, often make sense. Rather than eliminating management, companies should work on ensuring that promotions are made on merit and eliminate politicking, preening and credit-hogging throughout.

This article was published by City A.M. on January 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

City A.M.
As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?

Luis Garicano's response to the question: ''As some tech firms dispense with bosses, is there a future for managerless companies?'' is ''NO''
Management is not about to disappear. As long as decisions need to be taken to steer companies and business units, there will be two choices: endless meetings, or assigning the decision to a boss. Think of Apple's decision to introduce the iPhone in 2007. From 2004, it had to decide where to focus its resources. A new TV? A tablet computer? Or a phone? Making such a decision without a boss is extremely hard. It involves multiple units, from design to sales, and means changing the jobs of thousands of people. Making such a decision by committee would involve endless lobbying and politicking. Even some of the practices that seem most rigid and bureaucratic, such as endless approval chains for new projects, often make sense. Rather than eliminating management, companies should work on ensuring that promotions are made on merit and eliminate politicking, preening and credit-hogging throughout.

This article was published by City A.M. on January 9, 2014
Link to article here

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage