CEE in the News 2015


Health Affairs Blog
Making sense of price and quantity variations in U.S. health care

A recent study by Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor, and John Van Reenen has documented the remarkable variations across regions and age groups, and within regions, in U.S. health care spending. Previously, the Dartmouth Atlas project studied variations using Medicare data on people over 65, and the 2013 Institute of Medicine study showed no association between spending and quality in both over-65 Medicare and under-65 private insurance markets.

This article was published online by the Health Affairs Blog on December 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured', Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Health Management.org
Lowest Hospital Spending: Not Where You Think

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University, Yale University, University of Pennsylvania and the London School of Economics analysed the real prices that hospitals negotiate with private insurers. They found that hospitals that spend less on Medicare do not necessarily spend less on healthcare overall. The researchers analysed 92 billion health insurance claims from 88 million people that were insured by the three largest companies: Aetna, Humana and UnitedHealthcare.

This article appeared in Health Management.org on 21 December 2015. Link to artilce

Related publications
The Price Ain't Right? Hospital Prices and Health Spending on the Privately Insured, Zack Cooper, Stuart Craig, Martin Gaynor and John Van Reenen, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1395, December 2015

Related links
Zack Cooper webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage

DonnaD
Cellulare a scuola, sì o no? I consigli per usarlo nel modo giusto

A survey conducted by two researchers from the London School of Economics on a hundred high schools revealed that in schools where it is permissible for mobile students lose the equivalent of a week of school because of the constant distractions.

This article was published by DonnaD (Italy) on December 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


KABC-AM
News

...phones see clear improvement in test scores according to a study by the London School of Economics quote we found the impact of banning...

This news item was broadcast by KABC-AM on December 13, 2015
Link to programme here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times Educational Supplement
Social mobility prospects remain bleak, academic warns

The prospects for improving social mobility for future generations remain bleak, an author of a key social study released a decade ago will warn. Stephen Machin, professor of economics and research director at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), will say today that an ''ever-escalating educational arms race'' has meant the middle classes have continued to find new ways to retain the upper-hand. Prof Machin was one of the authors of a seminal study in 2005, which concluded that social mobility in Britain, alongside the United States, was lower than any other developed country. The study, supported by the social mobility charity the Sutton Trust, warned that many young people would remain stuck where their parents were if improvements were not made.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


BBC News online - Education and Family
Norwegian school funds UK youth charity

'Bleak' prospects
A seminar on social mobility in the UK, to be held at the London School of Economics on Thursday, will hear that too little progress is being made.
It will be addressed by Prof Stephen Machin, research director of the Centre for Economic Performance and author of a landmark report in 2005 highlighting the lack of social mobility.

This article was published online by BBC News on December 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


The Daily Telegraph
'Middle classes have found new ways to retain their upper hand in the educational arms race'

Article by Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Private tutoring is booming and elite universities remain preserve of middle classes; something must change, say Lee Elliot Major and Stephen Machin
Social mobility is too low in Britain. Too many people are stuck from one generation to the next in the same income bracket or social class group. Too much talent goes unfulfilled at great social and economic cost to the nation. We know this from a seminal study published by the Sutton Trust and produced by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics 10 years ago.

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on December 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America. A Report Supported by The Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


The i
Winter walks to warm the soul

... published last month, walking is better for you than hitting the gym. The London School of Economics found people who...

This article was published online by The i on December 5, 2015
(no link available)

Also in:
The Northern Echo (Darlington)
The Independent

Related Links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


European Politics and Policy Blog
Debunking the myths about British science after an EU exit

“Our current assessment is that leaving the EU would be likely to impose substantial costs on the UK economy and would be a very risky gamble.” Analysis by economists at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP)

This article appeared in the European Politics and Policy Blog on 4 December 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Series, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage

Mail online
How many calories can YOU burn by walking between subway stations?

A study published earlier this month concluded that a brisk walk is better for keeping weight off than going to the gym. Women of all ages and men over the age of 50 who regularly walked for more than 30 minutes were found to weigh less than those who took part in vigorous activities like jogging or cycling. The research by the London School of Economics found people who walked a lot had lower BMIs, and smaller waists than those who took part in regular sport.

This article was published online by the MailOnline on November 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Grace Lordan webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


FEWEEK.CO.UK
Good news in Budget - but what does it mean for learners?

Sandra McNally, Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research, considers the possible impact of Chancellor George Osborne's November 25 Budget.

This article was published in FEWeek.co.uk on November 27, 2015
Link to article here. See p.14.

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Gavin Kelly blog
The debate on social mobility is stuck: time for a city perspective

Social mobility plays a curious and sometimes tortuous role in our national political psyche. We love talking about it even if we can't, or won't, do much about it. Greater mobility is a goal lionised by all politicians - along with the NHS it's perhaps the closest thing to a secular faith that you will find at Westminster. Our media lap up story after story on it. And research on the issue has undergone a mini-boom in our top universities, dominating the work of some of our finest scholars over the last decade or so.

This article was posted online on the Gavin Kelly blog on November 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America: A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, April 2005
Big ideas: intergenerational mobility, Jo Blanden. Article in CentrePiece Volume 13, Issue 3, Winter 2009
Abstract | Full Paper
Social Mobility in Britain: Low and Falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005
Abstract | Full Paper

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Economist
Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Economist
Sharper elbows

Poor students have been protected by a generous maintenance grant and relaxed terms for the repayment of loans. Their participation rate has grown at a faster rate than that of their richer peers since the reform, finds Gill Wyness of the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article appeared in the Economist on 13 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Paying for Higher Education Gill Wyness, March 2015 Paper No' CEPEA026

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Adjacent Government
Raising academic standards in UK schools

In May, the London School of Economics (LSE) found that banning mobile phones from classrooms, could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in Adjacent Government on 12 November 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Observer
Artificial intelligence: ‘Homo sapiens will be split into a handful of gods and the rest of us'

Recent research led by Guy Michaels at the London School of Economics looked at detailed data across 14 industries and 17 countries over more than a decade, and found that the adoption of robots boosted productivity and wages without significantly undermining jobs.

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

La Voz de Galicia
Lo que Albert Rivera esconde, clave del éxito de Ciudadanos en las generales

Conscientes de qué es lo que realmente preocupa a los españoles, los de Rivera han desplegado todo su encanto en un puñado de medidas orquestadas por el célebre economista Luis Garicano.

This article appeared in La Voz de Galicia on 5 November 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

The Daily Dot
Spring Valley proves there's one device that should never be banned from schools

The primary focus of this incident is on police brutality and the disproportionate levels of school discipline that put young Black girls across America at risk every day. But those who explain the incident away, such as The View co-host Raven-Symone, say that the incident wouldn't have happened if the student didn't bring her phone to school and hadn't used it in class. Earlier this year, report after report praised the idea of banning cell phones in schools, citing a study that a strict cell phone policy improves students' test scores. According to research published by the London School of Economics, which looked at how cell phone policy changes since 2001 have affected more than 130,000 pupils in schools across England, learning environments without cell phones were tied to a 6.4 percent increase in national exam scores - on average. For so-called ''underachieving'' students, specifically, scores rose by 14 percent.

This article was published online by The Daily Dot on October 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times Higher Education
Variation in value of student bursaries ‘exacerbates inequality'

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that students from relatively wealthy backgrounds can receive more aid than those from poor families simply because of the university they attend. In a paper presented at the institute last week, she analyses the financial support available at 22 universities over a five-year period and finds that bursaries awarded by Russell Group institutions were twice as generous as those provided by others.

This article appeared in the Times Higher Education in 29 October 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Economist (online)
How academies are changing British education

This meant that schools in poorer areas were likely to become one: according to research by Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, under Labour a ten percentage point increase in the number of pupils eligible for free school meals (a measure of poverty) resulted in a 75% increase in the probability of a school becoming an academy

This article appeared in The Economist Online on 28 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills webpage

BBC Radio Humberside
Morning Show

Olmo Silva discusses Academies.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Humberside on 27 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

BBC Radio Humberside
Morning Show

Olmo Silva discusses Academies.

This interview was broadcast on BBC Radio Humberside on 27 October 2015. Link

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

IQ
Notre cerveau nous trompe lorsque nous parlons à des robots

Pour le découvrir, des scientifiques de la London School of Economics ont conduit une expérience durant laquelle une personne normale devait dire des choses suggérées par un ordinateur

This article appeared in IQ on 26 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Robots at Work Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Estado de Minas
Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Estado de Minas
Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Estado de Minas
Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Estado de Minas
Desemprego espanhol continua em queda a dois meses das eleições legislativas

O Cidadãos, de centro-direita, defende a ideia de um contrato único para pôr fim a um mercado de trabalho "com um núcleo duro de trabalhadores muito protegidos e trabalhadores temporários muito menos protegidos que nos Estados Unidos", explicou o economista Luis Garicano, artífice de seu programa econômico, em uma entrevista à AFP.

This article appeared on Estado de Minas on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

La Rioja
Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

La Rioja
Ciudadanos deja el copago en manos de las autonomías

El encargado de aclarar la propuesta fue Luis Garicano, responsable económico de la formación y mano derecha de Albert Rivera.

This article appeared in La Rioja on 22 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Luis Garicano webpage
Growth Programme webpage

BT.com
195 MPs, peers and staff attend mindfulness classes

To date, 115 parliamentarians and 80 of their staff have undergone mindfulness training since January 2013, after former Labour MP Chris Ruane and economist Lord Richard Layard set up a programme in Westminster.

This article appeared on BT.com on 21 October 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

West Sussex Gazette - Online
School says there's 'no cause for alarm' over mobile phones in classrooms

The success flew in the face of research by the London School of Economics, published earlier this year, which found schools which restricted the use of mobile phones experienced an improvement in test scores.

This article appeared in the West Sussex Gazette on 16 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

BBC News 24
Hour News

Sandra McNally interviewed on the topic of grammar schools following reports that the Kent ‘satellite’ school has been approved.

This interview was broadcast on BBC News 24 on 15 October (no link available)

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage

Why Tech Execs Don't Rush to Get Their Children Smartphones
The Huffington Post

Considering that teens use their phones almost solely for entertainment, it's not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that a ban on smartphones at school considerably improved kids' test scores. The formula is simple: Putting phones away makes for better schools.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 15 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage

The Conversation
Not all academies are the same – don't assume they will all boost results, article by Stephen Machin, Andrew Eyles and Olmo Silva

Our new research shows that many of the schools that have become academies since the Conservative-Liberal Democrat coalition government came to power are fundamentally different in nature from those that became academies under Labour. Because of this, their conversion is unlikely to generate the same positive results in raising students' attainment.

This article appeared in the Conversation on 14 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Academies 2: The New Batch Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, September 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1370

Related Links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage

Financial Times
Academic research cuts through Theresa May's immigration claims

In her address to the Conservative party conference, the home secretary delivered a pointed speech saying that ''there is no case, in the national interest, for immigration of the scale we have experienced over the last decade''. But are her claims supported by academic research? ... Although immigration increases the number of people living in the UK, it is up to the government to decide whether to build more infrastructure and housing. A 2014 study by Diego Battiston shows that, while immigrants are slightly more likely to live in social housing, the main reason why Britons find it hard to find places is the scarcity of property. A 2012 paper by Charlotte Geay presents evidence that, prima facie, the proportion of non-native English speakers in a year group has a detrimental impact on the educational attainment of native speakers at the end of primary school. However, this impact is modest and reflects factors including that immigrant children tend to go to less prestigious schools. Finally, in 2012 Jonathan Wadsworth showed that immigrants in the UK tend to use GP services and hospitals at roughly the same rate as the native born population, and are just as likely to self-report poor health.

This article was published by the Financial Times on October 6, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Immigration and the access to social housing in the UK', Diego Battiston, Richard Dickens, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1264, April 2014
'Non-native speakers of English in the classroom: what are the effects on pupil performance?', Charlotte Geay, Sandra McNally and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.137, March 2012
'Musn't grumble. Immigration, health and health service use in the UK and Germany', Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1166, September 2012
'The impact of immigration on the structure of male wages: Theory and evidence from Britain', Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.754, October 2006
The impact of immigration on the structure of wages: Theory and evidence from Britain, Marco Manacorda, Alan Manning and Jonathan Wadsworth, Journal of the European Economic Association, Volume 10, Issue 1, pp120-151, February 2012.

Related links
Marco Manacorda webpage
Alan Manning webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Community Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


ITV
This Morning

CEP study on the use of mobile phones in the class room mentioned

This programme was broadcast on 2 October 2015 on ITV. Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Friday Magazine
Happy cafés

Lord Richard Layard, founder of Action for Happiness, a professor at the London School of Economics and international expert on health and well-being, says: ‘We all want to be happy and we want the people we love to be happy.‘ Happiness means feeling good about our lives and wanting to go on feeling that way. Unhappiness means feeling bad and wanting things to change.’ The best society then is one in which there is the least misery and the most happiness, he says. ‘We wanted to spread more happiness in the community and the world.’

This article appeaerd in Friday Magazine on 2 October. Link to article

Related publications
Happiness - Lessons from a New Science Richard Layard, Penguin, 2nd Edition 2011

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Daily Express
Teacher faces sack after clash with boy over phone

A recent study by the London School of Economics found test scores rose by an average of six per cent when mobiles were banned from the classroom.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 2 October 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Mother Jones
Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Mother Jones
Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Mother Jones
Can We Give Electricity to Everybody and Still Stop Climate Change?

A group of British scientists and economists including Lords Nicholas Stern and Richard Layard have called for a "global Apollo program" to help fund the research and development of sustainable generation, storage, and smart-grid technologies, financed by 0.02 percent of global GDP.

This article appeared in Mother Jones on 1 October 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... A Global Apollo Programme to tackle climate change, Richard Layard Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer Issue
A Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report by David King, John Browne, Richard Layard, Gus O'Donnell, Martin Rees, Nicholas Stern and Adair Turner, June 2, 2015.

Related Links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

BBC Radio Suffolk
News

Debate on banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE [CEP] research.

The news item was broadcast by BBC Radio Suffolk on September 30, 2015
Link to broadcast here

See also
BBC Radio Shropshire
News
Discussion of LSE research on banning mobile phones from classrooms

BBC Hereford and Worcester
News
Discussion of banning mobile phones from classrooms mentions LSE research

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Guardian
'London effect' in schools due to gradual improvements not policies, says report

LSE report says primaries improving since 90s and abolition of Inner London Education Authority led to pupils' success
One of the researchers, Jo Blanden of the University of Surrey, said: ''London's schools have become extremely good at helping poor children succeed. This is despite the incredible diversity of their pupils. ''This success is likely to lead to better jobs and more social mobility among those educated in the capital.''

This article was published by the Guardian on September 30, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP publications webpage


Brand Republic
My Media Week Sue Todd

First is the up and coming Spark event, where, among other things, we will be revealing some new research around the evolving role that premium content experiences play in consumers’ lives. We discuss the role that Paul Dolan, professor of Behavioral Science at the London School of Economics, will play at the event and how the panel and interactive elements will work.

This article appeared in Brand Republic on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Links
Paul Dolan webpage
Wellbeing webpage

Quartz
This school has banned all technology in the classroom--and at home

A study by the London School of Economics suggests that banning mobile phones at school is worth the equivalent of an extra week of classes in terms of students’ development.

This article appeard in Quartz on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Independent
The EU should pay cash to areas to compensate them for high immigration, says Labour

Research by the London Schools of Economics and Centre for Economic Performance published earlier this year found that mass immigration to Britain had had no overall negative effect on wages or unemployment. The study found no connection between how much immigration an UK county had seen between 2004 and 2012 and the area’s level of unemployment or changes in wage patterns.

This article appeared in the Independent on 30 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
Immigration and the UK Labour Market Jonathan Wadsworth, February 2015 Paper No' CEPEA019

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

BBC News Online
Can a smartphone be a tool for learning?

Ministers pointed to research by the London School of Economics, which suggested a ban on phones could make a significant difference to the most disadvantaged children by reducing distraction from learning.

This article appeared on BBC Online on 29 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

BBC Radio Essex
Dave Monk show

Richard Murphy interviewed about research into effect in schools of banning mobile phones.

The interview was broadcast by BBC Essex Radio on September 29, 2015
Link to interview here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Teaching Times
Impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons to be reviewed

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article was published online by Teaching Times on September 29, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


On the Wight
Medina College bans all use of mobile phones: Here's one parent's view

In the Spring of this year, Medina College headteacher, Richard Williams, asked parents what they thought about introducing a ban on mobile phones in school. He quoted research which shows that banning mobile phones from schools improves GCSE results. Even used outside of lessons there is the pressure of social media, which can bring up cyber-bullying issues.

This article appeared in On the Wight on 28 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Essex Chronicle
Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Sowetan Live
Cellphones turning kids into zombies - Schools must nip scourge in the bed

In fact, a study was done in Britain by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy of the London School of Economics that proved phone-less classrooms improve performance.

This article appeared in Sowetan Live on 27 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Essex Chronicle
Sandon school head resists calls to ban phones in class

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from poor backgrounds.

This article was published online by the Essex Chronicle on September 27, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Essex Chronicle Media Group
Head resists calls to ban phones in class

Article on mobile phone use by children cites LSE report.

This article appeared in the Essex Chronicle on 24 September (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

SecEd - Online
Mobile devices: research and inspiration

A similar study undertaken by the London School of Economics found that test scores increased by six per cent after mobile phones were banned from the classroom. Good research and obvious conclusions.

This article appeared in Sec Ed on 23 September 2015 link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Inverse
Teens' test scores go up when their schools ban cell phones

Schools that ban mobile phones see a boost in student’s grades, a large-scale U.K. study has found. And European schools are following suit. The research published by the London School of Economics examined 91 schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester, and Manchester, and found that a no-phone zone generated improvements equivalent to students getting five good passes on General Certificates of Secondary Education. That bump — roughly 6 percent across the board — was greater even than schools that allowed students to keep their phones so long as they were switched off.

This article appeared in Inverse on 21 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Copenhagen Post.dk
Public school bans mobile phones

A public school in Skægkær north of Silkeborg has decided to ban the use of mobile phones during classes in order to reduce distractions. … Research by the London School of Economics revealed that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones showed a sustained improvement in exam results.

This article appeared on The Copenhagen Post.dk on 21 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ITV News Anglia
News

There was a great piece of research from the London School of economics which said that in schools that have a hard ban on mobile phones, the results go up, on average, by 6%.

This programme was broadcast on ITV Anglia on 18 September 2015 Link

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Cambridge News
Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a ''hard ban'' on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article was published by the Cambridge News on September 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Cambridge News
Cambridgeshire headteacher explores banning mobile phones

The new Cottenham principal said research by the London School of Economics found that on average schools that have a "hard ban" on mobile phones see a 6 per cent increase in their results.

This article appeared on Cambirdge News on 17 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ITV1 Anglia West
News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ITV1 Anglia West
News

Reference to LSE study which shows academic benefits of banning mobiles in schools

This programme was broadcast on 17 September 2015 (no link available).

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Confidencial Colombia
La economia de la felicidad

En los 70, el economista neoyorkino Richard Easterlin concluyó que, una vez superado un determinado nivel de renta en las naciones más ricas, la felicidad no se incrementaba como consecuencia de mayores ingresos. Hoy sabemos por investigaciones científicas, y por los hallazgos del economista inglés Richard Layard, que la renta actúa como un poderoso factor correlacionado con la felicidad, pero que es un tipo de felicidad momentánea, que se agota porque se cae en un círculo vicioso de insatisfacción por querer siempre tener algo mejor que 'el de al lado' y porque una vez alcanzado un ingreso mayor, se genera pronto una adaptación a este nivel de vida más alto en donde se pierde rápidamente la mayor felicidad obtenida. Como respuesta a esta problemática humana, la economía del desarrollo personal florece. De ésta se derivan dos líneas principales: los servicios a particulares y los servicios a organizaciones e instituciones.
In the 70's, the New Yorker Richard Easterlin Economist concluded that, once past a certain level of income in the richest nations, happiness not increased as a result of higher revenues. Today we know for scientific research and the findings of the English economist Richard Layard, the rent acts as a powerful factor correlated with happiness, but that is a kind of momentary happiness, which runs out as falls into a vicious cycle of dissatisfaction by wanting to always have something better than ' the of to the side ' and because once achieved one higher income soon generated an adaptation to this higher standard of living where the greatest happiness obtained is quickly lost. In response to this human problem, the economy of personal development flourishes. This entails two main lines: services to individuals and services to organizations and institutions.

This article appeared in Confidencial Colombia on 16 September 2015 link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

The Irish Times
Information technology and schools

Sir, – At last the penny is dropping among educationalists that technology in the classroom can be a hindrance to learning. A study by the London School of Economics in 2014 found that schools that banned pupils from carrying mobile phones to school showed a sustained improvement in exam results, compared to schools that allowed students to carry mobile phones. The improvements in education standards, by eliminating the distraction of phones, was most pronounced in disadvantaged schools.

This article appeared in the Irish Times on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Guardian
Clean energy cheaper than coal? Yes we can

......of Royal Meteorological Society, Dr Fatima Denton African Climate Policy Centre, Denys Shortt CEO, DCS Group, Adair Turner Former chairman, Financial Services Authority, Gus O'Donnell Former cabinet secretary, Richard Layard London School of Economics, Professor John Shepherd, Martin Rees Astronomer royal and five others

This article appeared in the Guardian on 16 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

Israel Herald
Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Israel Herald
Britain mulls ban on smartphones, iPads in classrooms

In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The report found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Israel Herald on 15 September 2015. Link to article

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


BBC Radio Wiltshire
News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

BBC Radio Wiltshire
News

Mention of LSE research on the effects of mobile phone use on children.

This programme was broadcast on BBC Radio Wiltshire on 14 September 2015 (no link available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ORF.at
Vom Lernen in der ''smarten'' Schule - news.ORF.at

Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

ORF.at
Vom Lernen in der ''smarten'' Schule - news.ORF.at

Für ein Verbot spricht eine Studie zum Thema, mit der die London School of Economics im Mai aufhorchen ließ. Wie die BBC berichtete, erhöhten sich die Leistungen der Schüler nach dem Verbot der Smartphones um sechs Prozent. Besonders schwache Schüler aus ärmeren Familien profitierten laut der Studie von der Verbotsmaßnahme. Die fehlende Ablenkung habe den Fokus der Schüler wieder vermehrt auf den Unterricht gelenkt, so die Forscher.
A study on the issue of the London School of Economics in may prick up their ears had talks for a ban. As the BBC reported that the student increased after the ban of smartphones by six percent. According to the study, particularly weak students from poorer families have benefited from the prohibition. Missing distraction have again increasingly directed focus of the students on teaching, according to the researchers.

This article appeared on ORF.at on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

NDTV India - online
UK orders probe into classroom disruption by smartphones

In a recent study, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an additional week's worth of schooling over an academic year. The LSE report also found that banning phones would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared on NDTV India online on 14 September 2015. link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Planning and Building Control
Investigation into the impact of smartphones on behaviour in lessons

The government recognised technology can expand the learning experience when used appropriately. However, the growth of personal devices is hindering teaching. A report from the London School of Economics found banning mobile phones from the classroom could significantly benefit learning. The study, undertaken in May, could add as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year.

This article appeared in Planning and Building Control on 14 September 2015 link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Huffington Post
Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms

A recent study published by the London School of Economics showed that schools where such technology was banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. The study also revealed that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit student’s learning as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over the academic year.

This article appeared in the Huffington Post on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Huffington Post
Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms


The Huffington Post
Phones and tablets could be banned in classrooms


Sky News
News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Sky News
News

Reference to LSE study endorsing ban on smart phones in schools.

Also on:
BBC Radio 4, BBC London 94.9FM,BBC Radio Somerset, BBC Radio Bristol, BBC Radio Wiltshire, BBC Radio Gloucestershire, BBC Radio Nottingham

This programme was broadcast on 14 September 2015 on Sky News (no link available)

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Nigeria Sun
British classroom-disruption by smart phone users faces major probe - Nigeria Sun

A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

This article appeared in the Nigeria Sun on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

i (The paper for today)
Kidz wiv mobys do me ed in (no LOL)

There is ample evidence that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. Research by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low income families. Last month, Michael Wilshaw, head of Ofsted called for omnipresent, blasted phones to be barred in all schools.

This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

i (The paper for today)
Phones could be barred from class to help behaviour

In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results. In Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote: “The results suggest that low-achieving students are more likely to be distracted by the presence of mobile phones, while high achievers can focus in the classroom regardless of whether phones are present. … banning mobile phones could b a low-cost way for schools to reduce educational inequality.”

This article appeared in I (the paper for today) on 14 September 2015 Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Guardian
Inquiry looks at mobile phones' effect on how children behave

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning phones from the classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article appeared in the Guardian on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Independent
Government considers classroom ban on smartphones and tablets

A recent London School of Economics study suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve school results.

This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Independent
A child can't learn with a mobile phone in the classroom

There is ample evidence now that academic results improve when phones are banned from schools. A research study by Louis-Phillipe Beland and Richard Murphy at the London School of Economics proved that a phone-less classroom improves performance, most of all for those from low-income families.

This article appeared in the Independent on 14 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Times
Smartphones could face ban from classes

Ofsted, the schools inspectorate, has raised concerns about secondary pupils using their phones at school. LSE academics released a study in May suggesting that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article was published by The Times (main) on September 14, 2015
Link to article here and subscribe for full access.

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Yahoo! News (UK)
Smartphones and tablets could be banned from classrooms

Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: ''Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. ''Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. ''This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning.'' In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article was published online by Yahoo! News (UK) on September 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Irish Independent – online
Britain to consider a ban on smartphones in the classroom

Britain could ban smartphones and other personal electronic devices, like tablets, from the classroom over fears that they cause too much disruption to lessons. In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester, which suggested that restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared in the Irish Independent (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

24 heures online
Corbyn peut plomber le futur électoral du Labour

Most of the currents of the party had indeed indicated during the previous weeks that they thought Jeremy Corbyn ineligible in 2020 and that they did not support any policy that was very left. "The economic plan of Corbyn does not commit to eliminate the deficit", said John Van Reenen, Professor at the London School of Economics. "Moreover, since his return to power in 1997, Labour had curbed the power of the unions and put an end to its ambition to nationalize all the tools of production. Jeremy Corbyn wants to question these advances."

This article appeared on 24 heures online on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Gloucester Citizen
Should mobile phones be banned from schools entirely?

A study by the London School of Economics in May found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students' learning by as much as an extra week of classes over an academic year, benefiting low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds most.

This article apperaed in the Gloucester Citizen on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian - online
Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from Birmingham classrooms

Mr Gibb said ministers needed to be sure the advice given to teachers “is fit for the 21st century when even primary school pupils may be bringing in phones or tablets.” It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. And a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester in May by the London School of Economics suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared in the Solihull and Warwickshire Guardian (online) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Times Online (Education)
Schools ponder classroom ban on ‘distracting' mobile phones

Behaviour expert Tom Bennett is to look into the impact of devices used by pupils under an expansion of his investigation into how to train teachers to tackle poor behaviour, Schools Minister Nick Gibb said. It follows concerns raised by schools inspectorate Ofsted over secondary-aged pupils using their phones at school. Mr Bennett said: "Technology is transforming society and even classrooms - but all too often we hear of lessons being disrupted by the temptation of the smartphone. "Learning is hard work and children are all too aware of this. So when they have a smartphone in their pocket that offers instant entertainment and reward, they can be easily distracted from their work. "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue, and behaviour challenges more broadly, to uncover the real extent of the problem and see what we can do to ensure all children focus on their learning." In May, London School of Economics academics released a study of schools in Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester which suggested restricting mobile phone use could improve results.

This article appeared on Yahoo News on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Telegraph (web)
Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

This article appeared in the Telegraph (web) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

MSN UK
Mobile phones and iPads could be banned from classrooms

In May, research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could benefit students’ learning by as much as an additional week’s worth of schooling over an academic year. The report suggested that banning phones would most help low-achieving children and those from the poorest backgrounds the most.

This article appeared on MSN UK on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Sunday Express
New move to ban mobiles in all schools

In May, the London School of Economics found banning mobiles from classrooms could benefit learning by as much as an extra week of schooling over an academic year. The report found a ban, sought by chief inspector Sir Michael Wilshaw, would most benefit low-achieving children and those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

This article appeared in the Sunday Express on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Sunday Mirror
Bid to ban use of mobiles in class

"We will now probe deeper into behaviour more generally to ensure that no child has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour." A study by the London School of Economics found that banning devices from class could benefit pupils by as much as an extra week of learning over a school year.

This article appeared in the Sunday Mirror on 13 September 2015. No link is available.

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Sun (UIster)
Kids' mobile ban in every school

Mr Bennett added: "This is a 21st century problem and the majority of schools are dealing with it effectively. But I will now probe deeper into this issue." The London School of Economics study said low-achievers and children from poor families would benefit most from a clampdown. Schools minister Nick Gibb said: “Our aim is to ensure that no schoolchild has to put up with having their education disrupted by misbehaviour.”

This article appeared in the Sun (Ulster) on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Sunday Telegraph
Smartphones and tablets could face classroom ban

More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent. There is currently no Government policy about mobile phone use in schools.

This article appeared in the Daily Telegraph on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Sunday Times
Behave, class, your mobiles are at risk

According to the DfE, a 2013 survey found that a third of schools banned mobile phones outright, with a further fifth limiting their use in lessons. In May, the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones from classrooms could boost students' learning by an extra week's worth of schooling over an academic year.

This article appeared in the Sunday Times on 13 September 2015. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Business Magazine (Romania)
Analysts: Greece will remain in ''intensive care'' for a long time, in the absence of substantial aid

Christopher Pissarides, London School of Economics, the winner of a Nobel Prize, said that Greece still has structural problems such as low productivity and lack of competitiveness. Greece is likely to need international aid for a longer period of time than the 3 to 4 years.

This article was published in Business Magazine (Romania) on September 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Christopher Pissarides webpage
Macroeconomics Programme webpage


Lancashire Telegraph
Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

However, according to a recent study published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the test scores of students aged 16 improved by 6.4 per cent after schools banned mobile phones.

This article appeared in the Lancashire Telegraph on 11 September 2015
Link to article here

Also in:
Lancaster and Morecombe Citizen online
Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?
Asian Image
Should mobile phones be allowed in the classroom or schools?

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


BBC Radio Gloucestershire
News

...the role of smart phones in the classroom its after research from the London school of economics suggested exam results improve in schools...

This broadcast was made by BBC Radio Glouchestershire on September 3, 2015
Link to interview here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


LBC Radio
James O'Brien

Mention of research from London school of economics about mobile phones in the classroom.

The research was mentioned on LBC Radio's James O'Brien show on September 2, 2015
Link to the broadcast here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Hamburger Abendblatt
Handyverbot an immer mehr Schulen

A recent study by the Centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics is quite the supporters of cell phone bans. The authors Louis-Philippe BELAND and Richard Murphy had compared student performance before and after a cell phone ban was issued at their schools. Therefore improved the test results for 16 years without a Smartphone to 6.41 percent. The conclusion of scientists: Less distraction promotes the learning progress and beneficiary audit services. In particular previously underachieving students from financially weak conditions would have benefited. Their benefits increased by 14 percent.

This article was published by Hamburger Abendblatt on September 1, 2015
Link to article here Related Publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools? Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350 May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


BBC Radio Newcastle
News

Mention of research on mobile phones in the classroom.

Broadcast on BBC Radio Newcastle on September 1, 2015
[No link available]

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


theguardian.com
Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

A recent large-scale study found that banning mobile phones improved exam results by 2%, even when gender and class had been accounted for. At first glance it seems an insignificant rise but the impact is equivalent to one extra week of school a year. The researchers from the London School of Economics centred their work on 91 schools and the exam results from 130,000 pupils since 2001. For those entitled to free school meals or with special educational needs the ban was doubly effective. Investigations such as this throw into question whether mobile phones could, in fact, intensify inequality.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on September 1, 2015
Link to article here

Also in:
MSN UK
Keep mobile phones out of the classroom

Related publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Sky News
Robot revolution: will machines take your job?

Uppsala University's Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels from the London School of Economics looked at productivity and employment in a variety of countries between 1993 and 2007 to see if the trepidation about the increased use of robots has been well founded. The pair examined data on the use of robots provided by the International Federation of Robotics. They also studied economic performance indicators across 14 industries and 17 countries, including the United States, Australia, South Korea and many European nations. The professors found that ''industrial robots increased both labour productivity and value added''.

This article was published online by Sky News on September 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


The Economist
Hiding in plain sight

In any recession, young people tend to suffer first. Moreover, unemployment among 16-24-year-olds was edging up even before the financial crisis. Youngsters have since faced a ''double whammy'' of scarcity of work and falling real wages, says Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics (LSE). Those who are unskilled, a group of which Britain has a larger share than most, were particularly badly hit.

This article was published in The Economist on August 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?, Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece 20 (1) Summer 2015 pages: 2-5
'Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals', by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1284, July 2014

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Anna Bindler webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


The Economist
Hiding in plain sight

In any recession, young people tend to suffer first. Moreover, unemployment among 16-24-year-olds was edging up even before the financial crisis. Youngsters have since faced a ''double whammy'' of scarcity of work and falling real wages, says Stephen Machin of the London School of Economics (LSE). Those who are unskilled, a group of which Britain has a larger share than most, were particularly badly hit.

This article was published in The Economist on August 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Crime scars: can recessions produce career criminals?, Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, CentrePiece 20 (1) Summer 2015 pages: 2-5
'Crime Scars: Recessions and the Making of Career Criminals', by Brian Bell, Anna Bindler and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1284, July 2014

Related links
Brian Bell webpage
Anna Bindler webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Herald Sun (Australia)
Male teacher drought may hurt boys

THERE'S plenty to be said for life as a primary school teacher: ... A study by the London School of Economics found male students were more ...

This article was published by The Herald Sun (Australia) on August 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Students' Perceptions of Teacher Biases: Experimental Economics in Schools' by Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No. 133, January 2012
Pupils' progress: how children's perceptions influence their efforts, Amine Ouazad and Lionel Page. Article in CentrePiece Volume 16, Issue 3, Winter 2011/2012

Related links
Amine Ouazad webpage
Amine Ouazad CEP publications webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for the Economics of Education webpage


The Independent
Daily catch-up: in other, non-Corbyn, news, here be idiots and other research findings

More evidence of the success of the academy schools programme was published yesterday. A new paper by Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin at the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE finds that ''the first round of academy conversions that took place in the 2000s generated significant improvements in the quality of pupil intake and in pupil performance''.

This article was published online by The Independent on August 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times Higher Education
Unknown variables

In a recent discussion paper for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, Stephen Machin, professor of economics at University College London, and Richard Murphy, assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin, found that the fees paid by growing numbers of overseas postgraduates studying in the UK have helped to subsidise additional places for domestic learners.

This article was published by The Times Higher Education on August 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Overseas students: the impact on domestic student numbers, Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 2, Autumn 2014
'Paying Out and Crowding Out? The Globalisation of Higher Education' by Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No. 1299, September 2014

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Essex Chronicle
Go back to school

It's a well-known fact that Essex is blessed with an excellent choice of schools, in both the public and private sectors. And thanks to some research published a couple of years ago by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the link between schools and house prices is now a proven fact.

This article was published by the Essex Chronicle on August 12, 2015
[No link available]

Also in
Brentwood Gazette
Go back to school
[No link available]

Related publications
Valuing school quality using boundary discontinuities, Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Journal of Urban Economics, Volume 75, May 2013, Pages 15-28
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Steve Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume Autumn 2012
'Valuing School Quality Using Boundary Discontinuities', Stephen Gibbons, Stephen Machin, Olmo Silva, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.132, January 2012
'Houses and Schools Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market. EALE 2010 Presidential Address', Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Guardian
Universities can learn from schools when it comes to improving teaching quality

Article by Gill Wyness and Richard Murphy
Rather than reinventing the wheel, universities should pay careful attention to what has already been learned in schools around effective teaching.

This article was published by The Guardian on August 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Economics of Higher Education website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog
Industral robots have boosted productivity and growth but their effect on jobs remains an open question

Robots and automated processes have become a feature of many modern workplaces, but what impact do such innovations have on productivity and jobs? Using a new dataset, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels present an analysis of the economic effects of robots since the early 1990s, noting that they have made a substantial contribution to productivity and aggregate growth. They also write that while fears of robots destroying jobs on a large scale have proven unfounded, there is evidence that they may reduce the employment of low and middle-skilled workers.

This article was published online by LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog on August 5, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog
Industral robots have boosted productivity and growth but their effect on jobs remains an open question

Robots and automated processes have become a feature of many modern workplaces, but what impact do such innovations have on productivity and jobs? Using a new dataset, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels present an analysis of the economic effects of robots since the early 1990s, noting that they have made a substantial contribution to productivity and aggregate growth. They also write that while fears of robots destroying jobs on a large scale have proven unfounded, there is evidence that they may reduce the employment of low and middle-skilled workers.

This article was published online by LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog on August 5, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Robots at Work', Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


The Conversation
Abolishing student grants and raising fees above £9,000 heaps more debt on poorest students

Article by Gill Wyness
There were a surprising number of announcements relating to higher education in George Osborne's budget this week. One of the most controversial was the announcement that university maintenance grants for lower-income students in England and Wales are to be scrapped from September 2016 and replaced with loans. The £9,000 annual fees that universities charge students will also be allowed to increase by inflation for those universities ''offering high teaching quality''.

This article was published online by The Conversation on July 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

Related videos
CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
View video here.

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Market Mogul
Consequences of a Brexit

The Centre of Economic Performance (known as the CEP) claim that Britain could have its GDP fall by 8%. In essence, the CEP claim that in a worst case scenario Britain could face loses similar to the ones that were experienced during the global financial crisis. From an optimistic view point and under ideal conditions, the CEP claim that the British GDP will only fall by 2.2%. Essentially, an EU exit could potentially cause the UK economy to contract. EU skeptics argue that this contraction is only temporary and that the elimination of strict regulations in the financial sector will outweigh the transitory contraction of the UK economy.

This article was published online by The Market Mogul on July 9, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

Related CEP videos/podcasts
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson.
View the video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


VG Nett
Mobil-forbud ga bedre karakterer

Texas-universitetet om studien som er publisert av Centre for Economic Performance ved London School of Economics and Political Science. - Mobiltelefoner kan være forstyrrende, legger han til ...
Mobile prohibition gave better grades
A large study from the University of Texas in the United States shows that for those schools who have practiced a ban on cell phones during school hours, its students produce better exam grades.

This article was published online by VG Nett on June 24, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


The Conversation
The divide is growing between what employers and ministers want students to study

Article by Sandra McNally
From this September, all pupils at secondary school will have to study English, a language, maths, science and history or geography at GCSE. This is the English Baccalaureate, or Ebacc, which education minister Nicky Morgan has insisted are core academic subjects that should be taken by all children. The director of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), John Cridland, does not approve: he has called for GCSEs to be phased out and replaced with an exam system that gives equal value to vocational subjects.

This article was published by The Conversation online on June 23, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage

FE Week
New 'data driven' BIS Vet research centre hits the spot

The new aims and role of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) has become clearer since a consultation event this month, as Andrew Morris explains.
The new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), funded by the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills (BIS) was the focus of attention at a major gathering of college leaders and researchers this month. Directed by Professor Sandra McNally of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the new research centre will be developing much needed evidence aimed at improving the delivery of vocational programmes and involvement of employers. A clearer picture of routes to employment and better information about their value should be the result.

This article was published by FE Week on June 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage

Stern
Ein Blick zurück: Staatspleiten sind nicht so selten

A look back: national bankruptcies are not so rare
The economic historian Albrecht Ritschl called Germany the most wayward of the 20th century: ''The Federal Republic owes your today's financial stability and its status as a senior teacher of Europe alone the United States, who have renounced a lot of money in both after the first and after the second world war'', he said.

This article was published online by Stern on June 18, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Reparations, Deficits, and Debt Default: the Great Depression in Germany', Albrecht Ritschl, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1149, June 2012

Related links
Albrecht Ritschl webpage
Macro Programme webpage


The Evening Standard
Reading volunteer, 80: I'm proof of an old dog can help young people learn some very useful tricks

This month marks four years since we launched our award-winning Get London Reading initiative to improve literacy in primary schools. So far more than 800 Evening Standard readers have become one-to-one reading volunteers with our campaign partner Beanstalk, helping over 2,370 pupils in 300 schools. Here, Robert Cassen, a professor at the London School of Economics, shares his experience as a reading volunteer raw recruit.
Article by Robert Cassen
Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, by Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, was published by Routledge in May.

This article was published in The Evening Standard on June 18, 2015
[No link available]

Related publications
Making a Difference in Education: What the Evidence Says, Robert Cassen, Sandra McNally and Anna Vignoles, Routledge, May 2015 Details

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) webpage

NewsRT.co.uk
Which universities offer the most financial support?

One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information. ''There has never been a way for students to compare what they are entitled to'', she says. ''It's only through trawling through individual university websites that they can find the information.''

This article was published online by NewsRT.co.uk on June 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Jersey Post
To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Jersey Post
To text, or not to text in the classroom...?

In fact, according to academics at the London School of Economics, the effect of banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalent of an extra week's schooling across the academic year.

This article was published by the Jersey Evening Post (USA) on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Guardian
Which universities offer the most financial support?

Universities spend huge amounts of money on bursaries and scholarships - over £400m in 2014. Yet there is no evidence that the level of financial support offered to students by institutions has any impact on their choice of where to study. One of the reasons for this, according to Gill Wyness, a researcher in education policy at the centre for economic performance at the London School of Economics and a lecturer at the University College London Institute of Education, is that students simply don't have enough information.

This article was published in The Guardian on June 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Spiegel online
Handys im Unterricht: Lehrer bringt Störsender mit - und wird suspendiert

That a ban on mobile phone use by pupils in schools may be quite useful, has now been proven by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy on behalf of the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics. The scientists compared the performance of students in four English towns with a ban on mobile phones in their schools.

This article was published by Spiegel online on June 4, 2015
Link to article here

Also in
Watson.ch
Lehrer geht mit Störsender gegen Handys im Unterricht vor – und wird suspendiert

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

Daily Kos
''We managed to put a man on the moon. Now we need to put clean energy on Earth.''

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published online by the Daily Kos on June 3, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change Report'. Details here.
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


New Scientist
New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


New Scientist
New Apollo programme wants moonshot budget to boost renewables

''The challenge is as big as putting a man on the moon,'' says Richard Layard of the London School of Economics, one of the founders of the programme along with other prominent scientists, economists and industrialists. ''It took £15 billion a year over 10 years to get a man on the moon, and we're suggesting that's the absolute minimum needed globally per year to crack this problem.''

This article was published by the New Scientist on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


The Guardian
Global Apollo programme seeks to make clean energy cheaper than coal

Lord Richard Layard, an economist at the London School of Economics and member of the Apollo group, said it was barely believable that the world only spent 2% of its R&D money on its ''most pressing problem'' of climate change and clean energy. He said: ''We do not think this problem can be conquered unless we reduce the cost of renewable energy below the cost of dirty energy.''

This article was published online by the Guardian on June 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


BBC World Service
News

Interview with Lord Layard regarding launch of the 'Apollo' programme to make renewables cheaper than fossil fuels.

The interview was broadcast by the BBC World Service News on June 2, 2015
[No link available.]

Related links
'Global Apollo Programme to Combat Climate Change' - details here
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


World Magazine
Study: Cellphones in schools hurt low-performing students

Last month, a study from the London School of Economics for the first time provided hard evidence that banning phones in school boosts student achievement. ''Mobile phones now are a ubiquitous part of a teenager's life'', said Richard Murphy, an economist with the London School of Economics' Center for Economic Performance and one of the co-authors of the study. ''Practically all teenagers now own a mobile phone, but there's been no academic study looking at what impacts this new technology has had on students' academic attainment.''

This article was published by World Magazine on June 1, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


Oldham Chronicle
School phone ban boosts test results

BANNING mobile phones in the classroom can boost test scores by more than 6 per cent, according to a new study. Researchers at the London School of Economics looked at secondary schools in four English cities, including Manchester, and surveyed test scores before and after the ban. It found low-achieving and low-income students improved the most. Report authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy said that despite the benefits of new mobile technology, phones caused distractions, reduced productivity and were detrimental to learning.

This article was published by the Oldham Chronicle on May 26, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


CBC News (Nova Scotia, Canada)
School cellphone bans raised grades says researchers

About 85 per cent of Canadian high school students have a mobile phone, but two economics researchers have concluded cellphones are distracting in class. Their research paper concludes high school students score higher marks when cellphones are banned. The research began in England when Richard Murphy was at the London School of Economics. Murphy is now an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

This article was published online by CBC (Nova Scotia, Canada) on May 25, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Why French school curriculum and timetable reforms forced teachers onto the streets

Article by Camille Terrier
French teachers went on strike on May 19 to voice their disapproval of two major reforms that have been proposed by Najat Vallaud-Belkacem, the French education minister. The two reforms are very different: one centres on changes to the history and language curriculum and the other on schools' autonomy to manage the organisation of teaching. Yet both have sparked criticisms from teachers, unions and French intellectuals. Reforming secondary education has emerged as a recent priority in France. The most recent results of the OECD's Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), which rank countries around the world based on tests of 15-year-olds and released last December, highlight increasing inequalities in achievement between low and high achievers in France. More disturbing is the fact that, among OECD countries, France is one of the countries where a pupil's social background is one of the strongest predictors of his or her subsequent achievement.

This article was published online by The Conversation on May 22, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Camille Terrier webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Guardian - teacher network
Let the kids use their phones in class

The London School of Economics showed that test scores of 16-year-old students were 6.4 percent higher after schools banned students from using mobile phones.

This article was published by the Guardian - Teacher Network on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


HoHoLinks.com
Education: Banning mobile phones could lead to better academic results, research suggests

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has released research that suggests the banning of mobile phones at school could lead to better academic results. The research paper, titled Ill Communication: The Impact of Mobile Phones on Student Performance, investigated the impact of banning mobile phones on student test scores. LSE surveyed schools in four UK cities of Birmingham, London, Leicester and Manchester and found that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increased post mobile phone ban.

This article was published online by HoHoLinks.com Education on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

MTV News
Did your school ban your iPhone? Here's why that actually isn't so bad

It may seem like common sense that keeping smartphones away from kids would improve their performance at school. Now a study by the London School of Economics has the data to back it up. ... ''By surveying schools in four English cities regarding their mobile phone policies and combining it with administrative data, we find that student performance in high stakes exams significantly increases post ban,'' authors Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy wrote in the study's abstract. ''Our results indicate that these increases in performance are driven by the lowest-achieving students.''

This article was published online by MTV News on May 20, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage


WFXG FOX 54
Study: No cell phones at school equals higher test scores

The study by the London School of Economics found a link between banning smartphones in schools and increased test scores.

This article was published online by WFXG FOX 54 on May 19, 2015
Link to article here

Also in: KPLC TV, Fox Toledo, Live 5 WCSC, WDAM-TV, MyFox Birmingham, KOBI TV 5, MyFox Memphis, UTV44

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

WSOC-TV
Kids do better when schools ban smartphones

Schools that have banned students from carrying smartphones have seen an improvement in the children's test stores, reported CNN Money on a new study from the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by WSOC-TV on May 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
How smart is it to allow students to use mobile phones at school?

Article by Richard Murphy and Louis-Philippe Beland
How does the presence of mobile phones in schools impact student achievement? This is an ongoing debate in many countries today. Some advocate for a complete ban, while others promote the use of mobile phones as a teaching tool in classrooms. So, the question is: Should schools allow the use of mobile phones?

This article was published online by The Conversation on May 12, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Richard Murphy CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Fact Check: are disadvantaged young people 12 times less likely to go to university?

The Conversation is fact checking political statements in the lead-up to the May UK general election. Statements are checked by an academic with expertise in the area. A second academic expert reviews an anonymous copy of the article.

This analysis shows the very stark difference in the probability of going to university between young people from the most and least advantaged backgrounds. Depending on how one defines ''advantaged'', the least privileged are between three and six times less likely to go to university than the most privileged. And the gap is much larger if one only considers elite universities.

One important point is that the gap is mostly explained by results at GCSE. So if we want the gap to be removed, more attention needs to be given to what impedes children from disadvantaged backgrounds from progressing up to age 16 - it is not mainly a question of improving access for 18 or 19-year-olds. This fact check supports the spirit of Ed Miliband's remarks, but not his actual numbers. It is a great illustration of the use to which the excellent English administrative data can be put by researchers. - Sandra McNally

This article was published by The Conversation on April 28, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015
A Question of Degree: The Effects of Degree Class on Labor Market Outcomes, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1221, May 2013
CentrePiece Magazine Article In brief: University exam results matter, Andy Feng and Georg Graetz. Article in CentrePiece Volume 18, Issue 1, Summer 2013


Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

LSE British Politics and Policy blog
Paying for higher education - what are the parties proposing?

University financing has again emerged as a key battleground issue in the 2015 General Election. Should fees be regulated lower and if so, how will the cost be financed? Gill Wyness explores these questions.

Published online as a blog article by LSE British Politics and Policy on April 21, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, April 2015

Related videos
CEP #ElectionEconomics 'Higher Education' video interview with Gill Wyness.
Video link.

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Observer
What would happen if Britain left the EU?

One of the main arguments employed by those in favour of remaining in the EU is simply how difficult it would prove to leave. We are deeply integrated with our European allies - economically, militarily and culturally. It's likely that Brexit (and what an ugly neologism it is) would lead to plummeting stock markets and an economic recession, with losses to GDP calculated by the Centre for Economic Performance at up to 9.5% - worse than the 2008 financial crisis.

This article was published in The Observer on April 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Should we stay or should we go? The economics consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series

Related CEP videos/podcasts
Should we stay or should we go? If we stay there may be trouble, but if we leave the economic trouble will be double. That is the main finding from 'Britain and Europe' by Thomas Sampson
View video here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Globalisation Programme webpage


Financial Times
Weighing up four theories on the UK's productivity gap

Theories abound over the causes of the UK's slump in productivity since the financial crisis;

Some economists, including John Van Reenen at the Centre for Economic Performance, believe the productivity puzzle is a consequence of Britain's slow recovery.

This article appeared the Financial Times on 19th April 2015. Link to article

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Joao Paolo Pessoa's webpage
See related publication - CEP Special Report - The UK Productivity and Jobs Puzzle: Does the Answer Lie in Labour Market Flexibility?


The Conversation
Manifesto Check: the Liberal Democrat's top policies

Article by Ian Preston, Andrew Street, Claudia Hupkau, David Chivers, Peter Beresford and Simon Burgess
The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about the Liberal Democrats' top policies.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at the LSE
The Liberal Democrats have announced their vision for skills policy over the next parliament in their election manifesto. The proposals mainly focus on increasing the number of apprenticeships, and on the future funding for the skills sector.

This article was published in The Conversation on April 17, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Conversation
Manifesto Check: Conservatives hold the course with schools plan

Article by Sandra McNally
The Conservative Party manifesto makes the following commitments in the area of school-age education:

The party's ''plan of action'' revolves around the curriculum, school structures (academies and free schools), funding and teachers.

This article was published by The Conversation on April 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance', Sandra McNally, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015
Link to policy briefing here

Related video/podcast
'School Spending'
Spending on schools needs to be protected - in real terms - as research shows that spending matters for a child's education. Sandra McNally interviewed.
View video here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research webpage


The Conversation
Manifesto Check: Lib Dems commit to skills, but some policies miss the mark

Article by Claudia Hupkau
The Conversation's Manifesto Check deploys academic expertise to scrutinise the parties' plans.
The Liberal Democrats have announced their vision for skills policy over the next parliament in their election manifesto. The proposals mainly focus on increasing the number of apprenticeships, and on the future funding for the skills sector.

This article was posted online by The Conversation on April 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Conversation
Manifesto Check: Conservatives fudge the numbers on apprenticeships

Article by Hilary Steedman
Welcome to The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics from across the UK subject each party's manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny.
The Conservative manifesto skates over some uncomfortable truths about the development of apprenticeship during their last five years in office. True, as stated in the manifesto, 2.2 million new apprenticeships (apprenticeship starts) were registered between 2009/10 and 2013/14. However, of those starting an apprenticeship in this period, 850,000 were adults aged 25 or over.

This article was posted by The Conversation on April 15, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

The Times
Teacher bias helps girls to do better at maths


The Conversation
Manifesto Check: the Conservatives' top policies

Article by Andrew Street, Catherine Harris , Hilary Steedman , Iain Clacher, Sandra McNally, Susan Milner and William Tayler

The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about the Conservative's top policies.

Hilary Steedman, Senior Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science

The Conservatives' manifesto skates over some uncomfortable truths about the development of apprenticeship during their last five years in office. True, as stated in the manifesto, 2.2 million new apprenticeships (apprenticeship starts) were registered between 2009/10 and 2013/14. However, of those starting an apprenticeship in this period, 850,000 were adults aged 25 or over.

In fact, the coalition government presided over and encouraged a huge increase in adult apprenticeships while numbers of 16-18 year olds in apprenticeship barely changed year on year. Most of those on adult apprenticeships were already in employment and a House of Commons Select Committeefound that many adult apprenticeships offered poor value for money. It is, therefore, depressing to see a bland promise of apprenticeship numbers trumpeted in the manifesto - 3 million over the next five years - with no preference for young people and no commitment to higher quality.

Read more here.

Sandra McNally, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science

On the curriculum, the Conservatives emphasise learning of the basic skills of literacy and numeracy in primary schools, and in secondary schools (where this fails). They are right to prioritise these areas. Inadequate literacy and numeracy is a problem for about a fifth of the adult population, and those aged 16-24 perform worse than those aged 55-65 (unlike in most other countries). Partly as a result, establishing basic literacy and numeracy leads to a high earnings return in later life.

Whether or not changing the curriculum will actually improve in these basic skills is another matter.

Read more here.

This article was published in The Conversation on 14 April, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website

BBC News Online
Marking bias boosts girls' maths in French schools'

Girls in French secondary schools are benefiting from a marking bias by maths teachers, finds research. The girls were given 6 percent higher marks than boys for similar work, says the study by the London School of Economics and Paris School of Economics.

This article was published by BBC News online on April 14, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Giving a Little Help to Girls? Evidence on Grade Discrimination and its Effect on Students' Achievement', Camille Terrier, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1341, March 2015

Related links
Camille Terrier webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

The Conversation
Manifesto Check: Labour's top policies

Article by Maria Goddard, Anand Menon, Christine Merrell, Claudia Hupkau, Hilary Steedman, Ian Preston, Jonathan Perraton and Steve Higgins
Welcome to The Conversation's Manifesto Check, where academics subject each party's election manifesto to unbiased, expert scrutiny. Here is what our experts had to say about Labour's top policies. Follow the links for further analysis.

Hilary Steedman, Senior Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
Labour's election manifesto promises four initiatives in the area of skills and apprenticeships; the Compulsory Jobs Guarantee, the Apprenticeship Guarantee, the Youth Allowance, and the Technical Baccalaureate. It is not clear whether the party's priority is to cut the benefits bill and take young people off the unemployment register, or to ensure that all young people gain the skills and experience they need to make the transition to a job with a future. Ultimately, Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
In its manifesto, Labour proposes a Technical Baccalaureate - but actually, this already exists. It was announced in 2013 by the Department for Education and then-Skills Minister Mathew Hancock. But rather than being a separate qualification it was designed as a measure to use in performance tables.

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Manifesto Check: 'Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle'

Article by Hilary Steedman and Claudia Hupkau

Hilary Steedman, London School of Economics and Political Science
Labour's election manifesto promises four initiatives in the area of skills and apprenticeships; the Compulsory Jobs Guarantee, the Apprenticeship Guarantee, the Youth Allowance, and the Technical Baccalaureate. It is not clear whether the party's priority is to cut the benefits bill and take young people off the unemployment register, or to ensure that all young people gain the skills and experience they need to make the transition to a job with a future. Ultimately, Labour's skills policy is a disappointing muddle.

Claudia Hupkau, Research Associate at London School of Economics and Political Science
In its manifesto, Labour proposes a Technical Baccalaureate - but actually, this already exists. It was announced in 2013 by the Department for Education and then-Skills Minister Mathew Hancock. But rather than being a separate qualification it was designed as a measure to use in performance tables.

This article was posted online by The Conversation on April 13, 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Hilary Steedman CEP publications webpage

The Economist
Repeat After Me

To revivify England's schools, the coalition embarked on a colossal structural reform. Soon after coming to power it changed the law to allow many schools to become ''academies'', giving them much greater say over how they spend their budgets and deploy staff. ... A study by two academics at the London School of Economics found a rapid - if small - improvement in test results at secondary schools that became academies.

This article was published by The Economist on April 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy Schools: Who Benefits, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy, CEP Policy Analysis No.11, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Economist
Repeat After Me

To revivify England's schools, the coalition embarked on a colossal structural reform. Soon after coming to power it changed the law to allow many schools to become ''academies'', giving them much greater say over how they spend their budgets and deploy staff. ... A study by two academics at the London School of Economics found a rapid - if small - improvement in test results at secondary schools that became academies.

This article was published by The Economist on April 11, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy Schools: Who Benefits, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
A Note on Academy School Policy, CEP Policy Analysis No.11, Stephen Machin and James Vernoit, July 2010

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


FE Week
Election questions from across the FE and skills sector

As the election period officially begins FE Week spoke to figures across the sector to ask them what three FE and skills questions they'd like answered by the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats in the run up to the general election on May 7 - as well as a bonus question on a subject of their choice.

Dr Sandra McNally, director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research at the London School of Economics:

What three FE and skills questions would you like politicians to answer before the election? What else? Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website

The Conversation
Four concerns about schools at the top of the election agenda

Article by Sandra McNally
With education policy set to play an important part in the May general election campaign, debates around the future direction of the school system will take place against the backdrop of fast-paced reforms made during the coalition's time in office.
These four key issues are likely to face scrutiny when it comes to schools policy:
    •How the UK measures up
    •Academies
    •School budgets
    •Helping disadvantaged children
This article was published by The Conversation on March 24, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Schools: the evidence on academies, resources and pupil performance, Sandra McNally, CEP 2015 Election Analyses Series, March 2015

Related video
#ElectionEconomics video - 'School Spending'. Sandra McNally interview.
Spending on schools needs to be protected - in real terms - as research shows that spending matters for a child's education.
View video here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

FE Week
London School of Economics to host new Centre for Vocational Education Research

A new £3m project aimed at researching new ideas for FE will be based at the London School of Economics (LSE).

Skills Minister Nick Boles will today announce that a new Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) will be led by Dr Sandra McNally from the LSE and based at its Centre for Economic Performance.

This article was published in FE Week on 24 March 2015
Link to article here

Related links
Profile of Sandra McNally in FE Week
'New vocational research centre 'won't clash' with Education and Training Foundation, FE Week
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website

The Telegraph
Renewables bill, Cost of going green 'won't turn industry away from Europe'

The cost of subsidising the construction of more renewable energy won't deter industry from investing in Europe, according to a new study by the London School of Economics. ''Contrary to some claims, rises in energy prices do not have much effect on the global competitiveness of businesses,'' said Antoine Dechezlepretre, one of its authors. ''Even a sizeable difference in the price of energy relative to the rest of the world has only a very small impact on a country's imports and exports.''

This article was published by The Daily Telegraph on March 2, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Asymmetric Industrial Energy Prices and International Trade', Antoine Dechezlepretre and Misato Sato, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1337, March 2015

Related links
Antoine Dechezlepretre webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Adam Smith Institute blog
Peer effects: they exist but they're not very big

A paper newly published in the Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics tests the size of these effects on achievement by looking at the random component of sorting that occurs when most British children transition from primary to secondary school at age 11. 'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, finds that although having brighter peers raises someone's grades a bit, the effect size is very small.

This article was published in the Adam Smith Institute blog on February 16, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England', by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, in progress
Details here
Peer Effects: Evidence from Secondary School Transition in England, by Stephen Gibbons and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for the Economics of Education Discussion Paper No.63, May 2006

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage


The Sunday Telegraph
Playing with political fire

Professor Luis Garicano from the London School of Economics says it is Syriza that has misjudged badly, both by teaming up in coalition with a virulently anti-German party, and by violating Troika terms across the board – halting privatisation, raising the minimum wage to €750 a month, re-hiring 10,000 civil servants, and blocking mortgage foreclosures. “Tsipras is slapping the Germans in the face: it is almost as if he wishes to be thrown out of Europe. I can’t see any political support for Syriza from any government in southern Europe. They are all terrified of their own populist movements,” he says.

This article appeared in The Telegraph on 2 February 2015 link to article

Related Links
Luis Garicano webpage
Productivity and Innovation Programme webpage

Parliamentary business online
Select committees: Academies and free schools

Select Committee publications: education
3. The growth in the number of academies and free schools and the significance of their impact on the educational landscape in England led us to decide that it would be timely to undertake a major inquiry into this area. We therefore put out a call for evidence on the following aspects of the academies and free schools programme:
• The effectiveness of academisation in narrowing the gap for disadvantaged children, and what further steps should be taken within the academies system to bring about a transformational impact on student outcomes;
• The process for approving, compelling and establishing academies and free schools, including working with sponsors;
• The role of the Secretary of State in intervening in and supporting failing academies, and how this role will work as the programme expands;
• The functions and responsibilities in relation to academies and free schools of local authorities and other organisations operating between the Secretary of State and individual schools; what these functions and responsibilities should be; and what gaps there are in support for schools at this level;
• What role academy chains play or should play in the new school landscape; how accountable they are; and what issues they raise with regard to governance arrangements;
• The appropriateness of academy status for primary schools and what special factors apply; and what evidence there is that academy status can bring value for money either for individual primary schools or for the system as a whole;
• What alternatives to sponsored academy status should be offered to failing primary schools.
5. We have benefitted from the expertise and assistance of two special advisers appointed specifically for this inquiry (Professor Becky Francis and Professor Stephen Machin) and of our standing adviser on education matters (Professor Alan Smithers).[5]

This article was published online by Parliamentay Business on Tuesday 23 June. Link to article here

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Stephen Machin CEP publications webpage

The Conversation
Only one in ten education reforms analysed for their impact: OECD

Only a tenth of education reforms carried out around the world since 2008 have been analysed by governments for the impact they have on children's education. A new report by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) think-tank looked at 450 education reforms carried out by its 34 member countries between 2008 and 2014. It found that only one in ten of these reforms were scrutinised for impact.

Peter Dolton, professor of economics at the University of Sussex, who has recently carried out research on the cost-effectiveness of education systems, said the OECD was ''right to suggest that there needs to be more rigorous evaluation of new education policy initiatives''.

This article was published online by The Conversation on January 19, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
Educational efficiency: value for money in public spending on schools, Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro Gutierrez and Adam Still. Article in CentrePiece Volume 19, Issue 3, Winter 2014/15
The Efficiency Index: Which Education Systems Deliver the Best Value for Money? by Peter Dolton, Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez and Adam Still, published by GEMS Education Solutions, September 2014.

Related links
Peter Dolton webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

El Confidencial
La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage

El Confidencial
La única cosa de la que de verdad deberías preocuparte si quieres ser feliz

Esta interesante reflexion de Gilbert incide directamente en otro pensamiento, tambien muy habitual, que es el de que el dinero no compra la felicidad. En una sociedad tan materialista como la actual es tremendamente comun que asociemos nuestra felicidad con el nivel adquisitivo y con la posesion de bienes materiales. Sin embargo, esto es asi? Una curiosa idea sobre este planteamiento es la que defiende Nattavudh Powdthavee, profesor de la Universidad de Melbourne. Powdthavee, en un estudio publicado en The Journal of Socio-Economics, indica que una mejora en nuestra vida social podria ser equivalente a un incremento en nuestros ingresos de hasta 85.000 libras al ano, lo que en euros seria unos 110.000.

This article was published online by El Confidencial on January 10, 2015
Link to article here

Related publications
'Putting a price tag on friends, relatives, and neighbours: Using surveys of life satisfaction to value social relationships', Nattavudh Powdthavee, The Journal of Socio-Economics, Volume 37, Issue 4, August 2008
Link here

Related links
Nick Powdthavee webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage