London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2016


New York Post online
The case against screens in schools

A 2015 London School of Economics study that looked at over 140,000 students across a decade found that when phones were removed from the classroom, test scores went up 6 percent. For students with special needs or those from challenged socioeconomic backgrounds, test scores went up a whopping 14 percent when distracting phones were eliminated.


OUP blog
Academy schools and the transformation of the English education system

Article by Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin

Increasing the quality and quantity of an individual’s education is seen by many as a panacea to many social ills: stagnating wages, increases in inequality, and declines in technological progress might be countered by policies aimed at increasing the skills of those who are in danger of falling behind in the modern labour market.

Related publications  Academies, charter and free schools: do new school types deliver better outcomes?’, Andrew Eyles, Claudia Hupkau and Stephen Machin, Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, August 2016


Economics of Higher Education blog
Grade prediction system means the brightest, poorest students can miss out on top university places

Article by Gill Wyness

With UK tuition fees now among the highest in the world, but benefits from having a degree remaining substantial, choosing the right university has never been more important for young people. The government has tried to make this easier by offering more and more information not just on the university experience but on the quality of the institution and even the potential wage return students could reap.


Epcatalunya.es
La pérdida de trabajo del padre puede afectar hasta medio punto la nota media de los hijos

In the study’Job Loss at Home: Children’s School Performance during the Great Recession in Spain’, researcher Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, of the Centre for Economic Performance of the London School of Economics, says that the loss of work of the father can lead to a "deterioration" of the educational performance of the children.


The Daily Telegraph
Minister: Teachers should confiscate iPads as pupils use them to bully and harass

More than 90 per cent of teenagers have mobile phones, but a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where they were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6 per cent.


The Northern Echo (Darlington)
Failing the school test

WE were told that the drive to convert schools into academies would boost choice, results and quality.

However, a new study by the London School of Economics casts doubt on the Government’s determination to see all state schools in England pushed towards academy status.


MailOnline
Primary schools' academy conversions ‘have not boosted pupil performance'

The conversion of primary schools into academies has not boosted pupils' performance, according to research. All primary and secondary schools in England were given permission to be run independently of local government in 2010 in an attempt to drive up standards. But a London School of Economics study has found no evidence to support a benefit to primary students' results during the first two years of "academisation".

Also in

Jersey Evening Post; Shropshire Star; Express & Star; Wiltshire Business


Halstead Gazette
Study shows converting primary schools into academies has 'not boosted pupils' performance'

NEW research shows the conversion of primary schools into academies has not boosted pupils' performance.

All primary and secondary schools in England were given permission to be run independently of local government in 2010 in an attempt to drive up standards.

But a study by the London School of Economnics has found no evidence to support a benefit to primary students' resutls during the first two years of "academisation".

This article was published online by the Halstead Gazette on November 21, 2016


Times Educational Supplement
Academy conversion does not improve primary Sats scores

Pupils in primary academies do no better in key stage 2 tests than comparable local authority schools, study finds  

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics looked at the test performance of 270 primaries, which had converted between September 2010 and April 2012.

They compared pupils’ test scores in the academic years 2006/07 to 2013/14 in these schools with a control group of schools that converted in the 2014/15 or 2015/16 academic years.

The results showed pupils enrolled in a school prior to it becoming an academy did no better in their KS2 tests than those sitting the same exams at comparable schools, “irrespective of the Ofsted grade of the school before it converted”.

This article was published online by the Times Educational Supplement on November 21, 2016

Link to article here


Guardian
Making primary schools into academies does not boost results, says report

Pupils at early conversters to academy status did not outperform children at schools that converted later, according to LSE research.

“The results cast doubt on whether further expansion of the academies programme will be beneficial to English education,” said Andrew Eyles of the LSE’s centre for economic performance and one of the report’s authors.

This article was published by the Guardian on November 21, 2016

Link to article here


Polish Express
Polski dzieci poprawiaja wynicki w nauce swoich brytyjskich kolegow/Polish children improve the academic performance of their British colleagues

A study carried out by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics shows that these students have a positive effect on the English students.

"Data from the Catholic schools, which attend children Polish immigrants show that the presence of foreigners can have a positive effect on the children of natives of our country," said Prof. Sandra McNally of Surrey University. Prof. McNally said, too, that this may be due to better standards in schools in Poland as well as the ethics of their parents, who have left their homeland to seek employment in the UK.

This article was published online by Polish Express on November 13, 2016
Link to article here


The Times Educational Supplement - TES
'The pen is mightier than the computer for learning'

Pupils make substantially more progress in literacy if they follow a pen-and-paper course than if they take a similar programme online, new research has found. Researchers working with pupils in 51 primary schools found that those following a paper-based literacy programme made 50 per cent more progress than those doing an identical course on a computer. ... Dr Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, an education researcher at the London School of Economics, who carried out the study for the Education Endowment Foundation, believes that it is not the medium of instruction that makes the difference. Instead, it is the teaching that goes along with it. ''In general, research finds very mixed results about the use of technology in school,'' she said. "There are studies that haven't found very big effects from the use of ICT in learning.

This article was published by The Times Educational Supplement on October 28, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website


Times Higher Education
Larger bursaries 'boost students' chances of getting good degree

Study of 36,000 undergraduates identifies positive relationship between financial aid, retention and attainment
The larger the bursary a student receives, the more likely they are to get a good degree, according to a major study. Researchers found that each additional £1,000 of financial aid awarded to undergraduates at nine English universities increased their chance of getting top marks (a first or a 2:1) by 3.7 percentage points, with about half of this owing to improved retention, and the rest attributable to higher test scores. Significantly, students from the most deprived backgrounds benefited the most, with the estimated impact of larger bursaries on the poorer half of the sample being about six times greater than the cohort as a whole. Undergraduates with higher prior attainment derived two to three times greater benefit than their course mates with lower school grades, according to Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, and Richard Murphy assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas at Austin.

This article was published by the Times Higher Education on October 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Independent
Brexit: UK faces £350m-a-week ‘divorce bill' as result of leaving the EU

Economist Thomas Sampson told The Independent: ''It's important to remember that the exit bill would be a one-off payment and in the longer run it is likely to be dwarfed by the broader economic costs resulting from reduced integration with EU markets, particularly if the government pursues a hard Brexit.''

This article was published by The Independent on October 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Brexit: the impact on UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 1, Summer 2016
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, CEP Brexit Analysis No. 2 by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, March 2016

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


AMEinfo.com
How is your smartphone distracting you and how to control it

Impact on academia
While technology has disrupted the educational system across the world, and with tablets and laptops replacing physical text books and the entire teaching and learning experience, smartphones remain to be the most controversial aspect in this regard.
Research conducted by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, and published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, found that banning mobile phones from school premises adds up to the equivalence of an additional week of schooling for a pupil's academic year.

This article was published online by AMEinfo.com on October 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Economist
Education: The road to London

The capital's schools are the best in the country. Can they be copied?
According to a report last year by researchers at the Institute for Fiscal Studies and the London School of Economics, one-sixth of the improvement in central London schools was the result of growing numbers of ethnic minority children, who everywhere in Britain tend to do better in exams and improve more while in school than white pupils. Some also suggest that inner London's startling gentrification has played a role, attracting better teachers to the capital and pushing out poor families, whose children tend to be less swotty.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Understanding the improved performance of disadvantaged pupils in London, Jo Blanden, Ellen Greaves, Paul Gregg, Lindsey Macmillan and Luke Sibieta, CASE Working Paper No.21, September 2015

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Jo Blanden CEP publications webpage


The Economist
Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


The Economist
Free exchange: Down to earth

Brexiteers need to respect gravity models of international trade
Furthermore, according to Swati Dhingra of the London School of Economics, gravity models do a good job of predicting actual trading relationships today.

This article was published in The Economist on October 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Swati Dhingra CEP publications webpage


The East Anglian Times
Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Last year, a study by the London School of Economics claimed schools where mobile phones were banned saw test scores rise by an average of 6%. Perhaps a study should look at the gains such a move could make when it comes to children's emotional well-being. I can't help thinking it would be worth more than 6%.

This article was published by The East Anglian Times on September 25, 2016
Link to article here

Also in:
Ipswich Star
Will you harm your child's academic progress if you buy them a new iPhone 7?

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015"
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Independent
Brexit: True cost of UK leaving EU without trade deal revealed

EXCLUSIVE: An analysis by The Independent of official data suggests British exporters would face a cost of at least £4.5bn - and in all likelihood they would take a hit many times larger
A separate analysis by the London School of Economics suggested the welfare losses of moving to the WTO rules in a ''big bang'' would be up to 3.5 per cent of GDP per head instantly. ''The fact that the country is in some way being told to be prepared to face what we regarded as a very pessimistic outcome is quite discouraging in itself,'' said Gianmarco Ottaviano of the LSE. John Van Reenen, a former colleague of Ottaviano and now Professor of Economics at MIT in the US, said trading under WTO rules would be a ''truly dreadful outcome for British people''.

This article was published by The Independent on September 23, 2016
Link to article here

See Also
DigitalSpy
Brexit: True cost of UK leaving EU without trade deal revealed

Related publications
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here

Related links
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Handelsblatt
Taten mussen folgen

Even [Sadiq] Khan's predecessor Boris Johnson campaigned with several plans to build 55,000 new homes in London and to slow down the price increase caused by demand pressures. Up to the end of his tenure, he failed. Khan says ''Our city needs more than 50,000 new apartments a year''. Paul Cheshire, real estate expert and former Professor of geography at the London School of Economics (LSE), already had been critical of Johnson's plans and also thinks Khan's promise is hard to meet. ''The goal is indeed desirable, but to achieve it, one would need a magic wand,'' Cheshire said.

This article was published online by Handelsblatt on September 22, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Paul Cheshire webpage
Urban Programme webpage


The Irish Times
Solas revamp brings overdue direction to adult education

There have been major changes to Ireland's apprenticeship system over the past few years, and now the overall number of apprentices is expected to increase to about 10,700. And, although Ireland's apprenticeship system is undergoing a much-needed and radical overhaul, to bring in more numbers, the old system couldn't exactly be described as broken. A 2010 report from researchers at the London School of Economics said that ''the duration and standard of apprenticeship training in Ireland is similar to the best European provision and intended to facilitate recognition as skilled craftsmen/women in other EU states''.

This article was published online by The Irish Times on September 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief: The state of apprenticeships, Hilary Steedman. Article in CentrePiece Volume 15, Issue 2, Autumn 2010
The State of Apprenticeship in 2010. International Comparisons: Australia, Austria, England, France, Germany, Ireland, Sweden, Switzerland by Hilary Steedman, jointly published by CEP and the Apprenticeship Ambassadors Network.

Related links
Hilary Steedman webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website


Financial Times
May goes into battle for selective education

Prime minister champions grammar system but critics argue reforms will damage social mobility
But critics were quick to dismiss the reforms. Professor Sandra McNally, director of education and skills at the London School of Economics' Centre for Economic Performance, said: ''Tests at age 11 are strongly associated with family income,'' she added. ''This change will probably increase social segregation.''

This article was published online by the Financial Times on September 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
CVER website
Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage


BBC 2
Newsnight

Sandra McNally interviewed about grammar schools

This programme was broadcast on 9 September 2016 Link

Related Links
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage

WFSB-TV online
Local educators, parents torn on cellphone use in schools

A study by the London School of Economics showed schools that ban students from bringing phones to class see an improvement in test scores by an average 6.4 percent.

This article appeared on WFSB-TV on 25 August 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage

Herald Scotland
Agenda: Business has a key role to play in helping the next generation acquire the skills required to meet future challenges

...UK-wide, we have increased our school leaver intake by 47 per cent because we have already started to see the positive results that increased social mobility and diversity can have on both your bottom line and wider society. ... Recent research from the Centre for Economic Performance suggested that Britain has roughly the same levels of social mobility as the United States, but trails other nations with similar demographics and economic history, such as Canada, the Nordic countries and Germany. Even more concerning is the evidence that our standing in this field is heading in a downward trend.

This article was published online by the Herald Scotland on August 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Intergenerational Mobility in Europe and North America: A Report Supported by the Sutton Trust, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Speical Report, April 2005
Social mobility in Britain: low and falling, Jo Blanden, Paul Gregg and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 10, Issue 1, Spring 2005

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


This is Money
Tax-free childcare is on the way - but will your family be any better off and how will it compare to childcare vouchers?

The average cost of full-time childcare across the UK for a child under the age of two is £217.57 a week. Part-time care (25 hours, as opposed to the full 50) costs £116.77 a week. Assuming both parents work full-time and get 25 days holiday a year, the average annual bill for 47 weeks of full-time childcare is just over £10,200 and for part-time is close to £5,500. It's hardly surprising then that working mums in lower-paid jobs are being forced to substantially cut their hours or give up work altogether after having a second child, according to a new study from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.

This article was published online by This is Money.co.uk on August 23, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


Times Educational Supplement - TES
'Revolving door' warning

Thousands of 16-year-olds are stuck in an educational ''revolving door'', returning year after year to study low-level qualifications, a major new study has found.
The Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) at the London School of Economics tracked a cohort of 575,000 teenagers for four years to find out what progress they made after GCSEs. The researchers' findings were stark: among the learners who sat GCSEs at the age of 16 in 2009-10, about 10,000 were found to be working towards low-level qualifications for four consecutive years.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement (TES) on August 19, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Guglielmo Ventura webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Viet Q.vn (Vietnam)
Tang nang suat lao dong len 800% voi robot naha kho cua My

The likely Locus of search robots and packaging of 25 thousand square meter warehouse helps to increase the productivity of the warehouse up to 800 percent.
A previous study of Georg Graetz scientists and Guy Michaels (UK) shows, the robot had much contribution to the increase in labour productivity. Conducted survey of 14 production-mainly in the industrial sector-in 17 countries (including the United States, 14 countries in Europe, South Korea and Australia) in the years 1993-2007, the research team discovered the density using the robot for the hours of work of all of these countries have increased 150 percent.

This article was published online by VietQ.vn on August 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


CIPD
Government urges employers to make breastfeeding at work easier

New initiatives planned to end 'unacceptable and unlawful' discrimination against working women
Employers are being told to do more to help mothers breastfeed their babies at work, as part of the government's latest initiative to tackle workplace discrimination against pregnant women and new mothers. The government's plans aim to encourage organisations to take ''a more progressive approach'' towards female staff who return to their jobs after having children, such as by providing private spaces for breastfeeding mothers to express and store their milk, and places where they can feed their babies while at work. ... In a letter to MPs, James said she wanted pregnant women, mothers and ''all women'' to be able to work ''if they choose to do so''. Her comments follow a study released last week by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, which found that most mothers in low-skilled jobs were forced to give up work after the birth of their second child.

This article was published online by CIPD on August 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


CIPD
Most mothers 'forced to give up work after second child'

Working mothers in low-skilled jobs are being forced to either considerably reduce their hours or give up work altogether after having a second child, according to a wide-ranging study that suggests lack of access to childcare has a profound effect on the labour market. While having one child has a relatively limited effect on workforce participation, women in low-skilled jobs reduced the amount they worked each week by an average of 18 hours after the arrival of their second child, according to the study from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics (LSE).

This article was published online by CIPD on August 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


The Daily Mail online
Having a second baby forces women into poverty: Childcare costs see mothers in low-paid jobs give up work to look after children instead

The addition of a second child can put families under serious financial strain - and in the case of women on the lowest incomes - convince them to give up work altogether in the face of rising childcare costs, a new study has found. Economists Claudia Hupkau and Marion Leturcq compared women in skilled and low-skilled jobs before the birth of their first child and again after their second.

This article was published online by the Daily Mail on August 7, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


Guardian
For UK women in low-paid jobs, a second child is a mixed blessing

A new study finds that, while the addition of a second child has little effect on the working hours of mothers in skilled jobs, it has a substantial and negative effect on low-skilled women who are forced to reduce their hours considerably or even give up their jobs altogether. The findings reinforce the view that there is a shortage of affordable childcare in the UK, despite successive government attempts to help women into work in recent years. The study, by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, to be presented at this month's annual congress of the European Economic Association in Geneva, examined a group of 3,000 women in the UK aged between 20 and 36 who had their first child between 2000 and 2001.

This article was published by the Guardian on August 6, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER) website


SchoolDash blog
Poverty of opportunity?

Education is not just a vital cornerstone of our culture and economy, it is also potentially one of the great social levellers. However rich or poor our parents, however supportive or dysfunctional our families, a high-quality education ought to give each of us the opportunity to live a fulfilling life limited only by our own talents and efforts rather than by the circumstances of our birth. Or so the theory goes. In this post we look at the question of economic deprivation among children, and in particular how different types of schools either enable or hinder opportunities for those from poorer families. ... The rest of this post looks at these trends in more detail. You may also be interested to see other related work such as the Sutton Trust's recent analysis of social selection in primary schools, Ofsted's 2013 report on underachievement among poor pupils, and the LSE's 2012 research into the effects of schools on house prices.

This article was published online by the SchoolDash blog on August 2, 2016
Link to article here

CEP research on Twitter
Lilian Greenwood @LilianGreenwood (Labour MP for Nottingham)
RT @emranmian: On grammar schools and social mobility ... @SchoolDash work from last week is pretty damning

Related publications
The link between schools and house prices is now an established fact, Stephen Gibbons, LSE British Politics and Policy blog, September 25, 2012
Big ideas: valuing schooling through house prices, Stephen Gibbons. Article in CentrePiece Volume 17, Issue 2, Autumn 2012
Houses and Schools: Valuation of School Quality through the Housing Market, EALE 2010 Pressidential Address, Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Occasional Paper No.29, May 2011

Related links
Stephen Gibbons webpage
Urban Programme webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


National Governors' Association
Research Matters - Are academies better? National Governors' Association

This finding is mirrored at least in part by a study of sponsored academies established under the previous Labour government, conducted by the London School of Economics, which argues that the impact of conversion should be analysed at pupil level because, on average, academies began admitting higher ability pupils after conversion. The academies did have a positive impact on pupils who were enrolled prior to conversion, however, and the evidence suggests that headteacher replacement, changes in management structure and curriculum change were the key factors underpinning this improvement.

This article was published online by the National Governors' Association on July 22, 2016 in the July/August issue of the NGA Magazine
Link to article here

Related publications
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Vox
Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Vox
Wage inequality: The spatial dimension

Article by Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James Davis and Richard Freeman
Income inequality has risen throughout the advanced world. Various explanations have been suggested for this, but these tend to focus on who you are. This column shifts the focus to where you work. Data from the US reveal that over the period 1992-2007, two-thirds of the rise in earnings dispersion was due to increased variation across establishments. Moreover, almost 80% of the increase in earnings dispersion among workers who remained at the same establishment from year to year was due to a widening of wages across establishments rather than within establishments.

This article was published online by the Vox on July 18, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
It's Where You Work: Increases in Earnings Dispersion across Establishments and Individuals in the US, Erling Barth, Alex Bryson, James C. Davis and Richard Freeman, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1311, November 2014

Related links
Alex Bryson webpage
Richard Freeman webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Admin5.com (China)
Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


Admin5.com (China)
Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms

Artificial intelligence is bound to exacerbate inequalities but why are economists still for it platforms
That is to say, technical parts of the economy made great contribution to productivity growth. In 2015 a 17-country study found that between 1993 and 2007, average annual GDP growth rate of the robot industry for these countries has contributed 0.4%, this time the national GDP growth rate of more than one-tenth (Graetz and Michaels 2015).

This article was published online by Admin5.com (China) on July 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Robots at work: the impact on productivity and jobs, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 1 Summer 2015
Robots at Work, Georg Graetz and Guy Michaels, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1335, March 2015

Related Links
Georg Graetz webpage
Guy Michaels webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage


CVER blog
If A-Levels aren't for you, choices at age 16 could now get a whole lot simpler

Article by CVER Director, Sandra McNally, on some of the recommendations of the recent Sainsbury Report
The incoming British prime minister Theresa May has outlined a vision of a country that ''works not for the privileged few but that works for every one of us ... because we're going to give people control over their lives''. A good place for her to start would be to make sure that the government sticks to its promise to implement the 34 recommendations set out in a new report that aims to radically simplify the education choices available for people after age 16. The Sainsbury report, published on July 8, sets out a blueprint for technical education for young people and adults. The report is wide-ranging and ambitious, with recommendations that cover many aspects of the way education is provided. The government's Post-16 Skills Plan, published on the same day, says the Sainsbury recommendation will be accepted ''unequivocally where that is possible within existing budgets''.

This article was published on the Centre for Vocational Education (CVER) blog on July 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
This article was originally published on The Conversation

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
CVER website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Education Policy Institute
Reflections on ''Academies: 15 Years On'' Conference

Yesterday the Education Policy Institute, in partnership with the Sutton Trust, hosted the 'Academies: 15 years on summit'. This was an opportunity for researchers, policy makers and system leaders to come together and consider the latest evidence on the impact of academies on pupil outcomes and what Government should do now.
Dr Olmo Silva presented the work that he, Professor Stephen Machin, and colleagues at LSE have carried out at a system level. This work, commissioned by EPI, looked at the impact of pre-2010 sponsored academies and provided the first robust analysis of the impact of post-2010 secondary converter academies. They found positive impacts for the early sponsored academies, with improvements that were equivalent to five grades across a pupil's GCSE subjects. They also identified positive effects for converter academies that had previously been rated as outstanding - equivalent to about two grades across a pupil's GCSE subjects. But they found no effect for converter academies previously rated as good or satisfactory. Given that such schools make up around two thirds of converters, this is a worrying finding.

This article was published online by the Education Policy Institute on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Academies 2: The New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Business Day Live
Are economists at fault for Brexit?

John van Reenen, the outgoing director of the London School of Economics’s Centre for Economic Performance, doesn’t think the profession should be too down on itself. Had economists engaged more "in my frank view, it would not have made a jot of difference".

This article appeared in Business Day Live on 13 July. Link to article

Related Links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

The Conversation
If A-Levels aren't for you, choices at age 16 could now get a whole lot simpler

Article by Sandra McNally, Director of the Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE and Head of Education and Skills Programme, CEP
The incoming British prime minister Theresa May has outlined a vision of a country that works not for the privileged few but that ''works for every one of us ... because we're going to give people control over their lives''. A good place for her to start would be to make sure that the government sticks to its promise to implement the 34 recommendations set out in a new report that aims to radically simplify the education choices available for people after age 16. ... Nowhere is reform more necessary than in the options for 16-year-olds, after they finish their GCSE exams, as my colleagues and I have outlined in a new paper. As it currently stands, the system is obtuse - even for us ''experts''.

This article was published by The Conversation blog on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.001, July 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Centre for Vocational Education Research website
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The New Times (Rwanda)
Are phones a blessing or curse for students?

Research findings
A new study on students' test performance and smartphones found kids who attend schools with smartphone bans did better on tests - even more so if they were struggling academically before the ban was instituted. Researchers at the London School of Economics gathered test scores from thousands of 16-year-old between 2000 to 2012, studying the effects of cell phone bans on schools. They found that the bans boosted test scores by six per cent. If a child was previously academically under-performing, their scores improved up to 14 per cent. Dr Richard Murphy, the assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas and co-author of the study, said, ''Our conclusion is that unstructured use of phones in schools has a negative impact, mainly for kids at the bottom half of the class. Schools should consider having a policy restricting phone use''.

This article was published by The New Times (Rwanda) on July 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Schools Week
Experts News - Results are in: Academy status works for the best and worst schools, but that's about it

After years of debate over the effectiveness of academy status, the Education Policy Institute has now released data which it says shows the causal impact of academy status on school performance. Editor Laura McInerney explains what the researchers found.
Does academy status lift performance in schools? It's a vital question given the country is spending millions changing schools into academies. So far there had been no answer. But a new report, commissioned by the Education Policy Institute and published today, finally provides some.
To start with the conclusions:
1. It seems that Labour forcing badly performing schools to become academies before 2012 was a good thing.
Hurray for Labour.
2. It also seems that, after 2010, letting outstanding schools convert into becoming academies was also a good thing.
Well done the Coalition.

BUT
3. For everyone else after 2010, becoming an academy doesn't seem to have had much effect. In fact, it might have made things a tiny bit worse.

So, why is there a difference between pre-2010 and post-2010 academies?

This article was published online by Schools Week on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Andrew Eyles webpage
Gabriel Heller-Sahlgren webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Matteo Sandi webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Independent
'No evidence' academy status improves grades at good or satisfactory schools

New research has found ''no evidence'' that academy status leads to better grades for pupils at schools rated good or satisfactory. The study, by the London School of Economics and the Education Policy Institute (EPI), found pupils' performance at schools already rated outstanding when they converted, totalling 390 institutions, saw a ''statistically significant'' rise in grades. The research also found that Coalition-era academies had a lower impact on performance than the Labour-style sponsored academies, which were introduced in 2002 to help struggling schools.

This article was published by The Independent on July 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Olmo Silva webpage
Andrew Eyles webpage
Gabriel Heller-Sahlgren webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Matteo Sandi webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Daily News Egypt
LuxLeaks, law and justice all part of tax scandal trial in Luxembourg

The LuxLeaks papers clearly illustrate that Luxembourg’s most important export product is tax avoidance. That is why French economics researcher Gabriel Zucman says that Luxembourg is “the center of European tax evasion.” Zucman, who has lectured at the London School of Economics since 2014, describes the grand duchy as an “economic colony of the international financial industry.”

This article appeared in Daily News Egypt on 28 June 2016. Link to article

Related links
Gabriel Zucman webpage
Growth Programme webpage

Forbes Online
Which Management Practices Are Most Beneficial To Firm Performance?

Along with colleagues Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, London School of Economics, Sadun challenges this view in a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Management as a Technology?

This article appeared in Forbes on 27 June 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Management as a Technology? Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen, June 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1433

Related Links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

Forbes Online
Which Management Practices Are Most Beneficial To Firm Performance?

Along with colleagues Nicholas Bloom, Stanford University, and John Van Reenen, London School of Economics, Sadun challenges this view in a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper, Management as a Technology?

This article appeared in Forbes on 27 June 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Management as a Technology? Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, John Van Reenen, June 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1433

Related Links
Nicholas Bloom webpage
Raffaella Sadun webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth webpage

BBC World Service - In the Balance
UK votes to leave EU

What does the UK's decision to leave the European Union mean for the future of the single market? Economists talk of sustained market turbulence, devaluations and an imminent recession, but will it be Britain or the EU suffering the worst effects long-term? And as eurosceptic political parties across the continent are buoyed by the UK's vote and call for their own referendums, what must the EU project itself do to survive? Ed Butler is joined by three guests from across the EU: Damien Lempereur from Debout La France, a political party which wants a French exit from the EU; Jens Zimmerman, a member of Germany's Social Democratic Party and part of Angela Merkels coalition government; and Swati Dhingra, from the London School of Economics.

This programme was broadcast on the BBC World Service Radio - In the Balance programme on June 26, 2016
Link to broadcast here [Swati Dhingra brought in to the interview 08:37]

Related publications
Full series of CEP Brexit Analyses can be seen here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)
El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)
El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


La Izquierda Diario (Spanish)
El Brexit, mala noticia para el segundo semestre

First views on the global economic impact of such episode refer to one (even minor) world growth rate. Thus for example claimed John Van Reenen of the London School of Economics, who said the effect ''disincentive'' to investment by the immediate context of uncertainty generated by the Brexit.

This article was published online by La Izquierda Diario (Spain) on June 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis papers is available in one publication. Download from here.

Related links
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Britain more prosperous ''IN''
The Telegraph

We are economists who care about Britain and its future. We feel compelled to speak out on the risks of Leaving and opportunities from Remaining in the EU. If Britain votes to Leave we believe that:

• A recession causing job losses will become significantly more likely due to the shock and uncertainty of Brexit. With interest rates near zero and debt still high, the Bank of England and Government would have limited ability to prevent such a recession.

• A drop in the pound and increased tariffs on imports will cause the costs of everyday goods to go up increasing inflation.

• Investment in the UK will drop harming innovation and future job growth.

• These impacts will fall most heavily on households with middle and low incomes.

• Less growth means less government revenue which means higher taxes and less to spend on services like the NHS.

Leave will say these points are 'Project Fear'. We say they are 'Project Reality'.

This open letter was published by The Telegraph on June 21, 2016
Link to the letter here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Richard Layard webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog
Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


LSE EUROPP - European Politics and Policy blog
Scenarios of a new UK-EU relationship: A 'soft' Brexit

What consequences will Britain's EU referendum have for both the UK and the rest of Europe? In a series of papers published as a collaboration between EUROPP and CIDOB (the Barcelona Centre for International Affairs), LSE authors analyse the prospects for three scenarios - a Bremain, a 'soft' Brexit and a 'harsh' Brexit. Swati Dhingra discusses what would happen in the case of a 'soft' Brexit, which is defined as the UK exiting the EU without a significant deterioration in relations between Britain and other EU countries. The full papers are available here.

This article was published online by LSE's EUROPP - European Politics and Policy - blog on June 9, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
BREXIT 2016: Policy Analysis from the Centre for Economic Performance, Holger Breinlich, Swati Dhingra, Saul Estrin, Hanwei Huang, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.08, June 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK’s options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.01, February 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


LSE Business Review blog
How do ‘Economists for Brexit' manage to defy the laws of gravity?

The possibility of the UK leaving the European Union (EU) has generated an unusual degree of consensus among economists. Acrimony and rancour surrounded debates around austerity and joining the euro, but analysis from the Bank of England to the OECD to academia has all concluded that Brexit would make us economically worse off. The disagreement is mainly over the degree of impoverishment (for example, Dhingra et al, 2016a; OECD, 2016; HM Treasury, 2016; PWC, 2016; NIESR, 2016). Perhaps the one exception is the recent and much publicised work of 'Economists for Brexit' (2016). Since any coherent economic case for leaving the EU was been largely 'missing in action', it is refreshing to get some clarity over the Leave campaign's vision of the UK's post-Brexit economic arrangements. The only modelling details provided by Economists for Brexit come from Professor Patrick Minford of Cardiff University (Minford, 2015; 2016; Minford et al, 2016). He argues that Brexit will raise the UK's welfare by 4% as a result of increased trade.

This article was published online by the LSE Business Review blog on May 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Economists for Brexit: A Critique, Thomas Sampson, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.06, May 2016
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


The Telegraph
Education: Free childcare 'has made no improvement in primary school exam results', research shows

Free nursery care for three year olds has made little or no improvement in primary school exam results, a nine-year study has revealed as academics say the Labour policy has had 'no impact'. ... However, the first and largest study on how effective the policy has been has shown there has been little in the way of academic improvement for children age 7 and 11. ... Dr Jo Blanden, one of the researchers and senior lecturer in economics at the University of Surrey, said the policy was not effective because free care was of lesser quality than private one.

This article was published by The Telegraph on May 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Universal Pre-School Education: The Case of Public Funding with Private Provision, Jo Blanden, Emilia Del Bono, Sandra McNally and Birgitta Rabe, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1352, May 2015

Related links
Jo Blanden webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times of Malta Online
What's at stake in the UK's EU vote

The claim, however, that migration is a drain on the welfare state is false. EU migrants for the most part move to Britain to work, and a study by the London School of Economics has shown that they are net contribu¬tors to the economy as a result of the taxes they pay.

This article appeared in the Times of Malta Online on 23 May 2016. Link to article

Related publications
Brexit and the Impact of Immigration on the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, John Van Reenen and Jonathan Wadsworth, CEP Brexit Analysis Paper No.05, May 2016
See the complete CEP Brexit Analysis Series here

Related links
Jonathan Wadsworth webpage
Labour Markets Programme webpage

Economic and Social Research Council News
School ban on mobile phones helping pupils

Research for the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE examines the impact of mobile phone bans on pupils' academic achievement in subsequent years. The researchers, Louis Philippe Beland at Louisiana State University, and Richard Murphy at the University of Texas at Austin, surveyed schools in Birmingham, Leicester, London and Manchester about their mobile phone policies since 2001 and combined it with results data from externally marked national exams.

This article was published online by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) on May 18, 2016
Link to article here

This article was originally published in the ESRC's Britain in 2016 magazine. See here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Guardian
Students who use digital devices in class 'perform worse in exams'

Research published last year by the London School of Economics found that banning mobile phones affected school pupils according to their ability. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... and has no significant impact on high-achievers,'' it concluded.

This article was published by the Guardian on May 11, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill communication: technology, distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times Educational Supplement (TES)
'Phonics, decoding and whole-word recognition are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers'

Learning to decipher the squiggles on the page well enough to pass the key stage 1 Sats does not make you a reader, says author Susan Elkin
Teaching reading in itself is pointless. All the phonics, decoding skills and whole-word recognition in the world are a waste of time unless you then develop children as real readers. ... The trouble with learning the mechanics - of almost anything - is that if you don't immediately and continuously apply what you've learned, you lose the skills. That is probably why The Centre for Economic Performance recently reported that by the age of 11, having been exposed to phonics at an earlier age makes no difference to a child's reading. It also explains the alarming recent observation from the University of Sheffield that many undergraduates are unable to read whole books. We are failing to develop readers.

This article was published by the Times Educational Supplement (TES) on May 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


familygolive.com
Phonics not necessarily the best way to teach reading, says study

Although phonics - breaking words down into their constituent parts - has been one of the main ways in which parents and teachers teach children to read for many years, new research from the London School of Economics (LSE) has shown that the method is not demonstrably better than other ways of learning to read. ... However, the study did find that the use of phonics could help particular groups of pupils who may be more likely to be disadvantaged in learning to read, such as those from deprived backgrounds or children who have English as a second language. The study also gave phonics as a teaching method its broad approval, noting that it was a simply and cost-effective way of teaching children to read.

This article was published by familygolive.com on May 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Teacher
Teaching reading with synthetic phonics

A large-scale study tracking the progress of more than 270 000 students has concluded that teaching reading through a synthetic phonics programme has long-term benefits for children from poorer backgrounds and those who do not speak English as a first language. The analysis, from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, also found the teaching method has large initial benefits for all students at age five and age seven.

This article was published online by Teacher on May 4, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Hechinger Report
Will giving greater student access to smartphones improve learning?

Although empirical evidence about the effects of phone access on learning seems to be scarce, the findings of a recent study on student phone access and the achievement gap by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy for the London School of Economics and Political Science echoed our concerns. ''We find that mobile phone bans have very different effects on different types of students,'' the authors wrote. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... the most, and has no significant impact on high achievers.''

This article was published online by the Hechinger Report on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction & Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Atlantic
Do smartphones have a place in the classroom?

From middle schools to colleges, cellphones' adverse effects on student achievement may outweigh their potential as a learning tool.
The findings of a recent study on student phone access and the achievement gap by Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy for the London School of Economics and Political Science echoed my concerns. ''We find that mobile phone bans have very different effects on different types of students,'' the authors wrote. ''Banning mobile phones improves outcomes for the low-achieving students ... the most, and has no significant impact on high achievers.''

This article was published online by The Atlantic on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The New York Times
OECD's Gurria-No Economic Upside for UK from Brexit

The head of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development said on Wednesday that he saw no potential benefits for the British economy if voters decide to leave the European Union at a referendum in June. Angel Gurria said a new OECD report showed a hit to British economic growth under all scenarios if the country left the EU compared with a decision to stay in the bloc. ''The best outcome is still worse than remaining and the worst outcomes are very bad indeed,'' he said in a speech at the London School of Economics as the OECD published its report on the impact of a so-called Brexit.

This article was published online by The New York Times on April 27, 2016
Link to article here

CEP Event details
CEP Public Lecture on April 27, 2016: 'To Brexit or not to Brexit: a taxing question' given by Angel Gurria, Secretary-General of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). Moderator: Dr Thomas Sampson; Chair: Professor Lord Stern.
Download the speech here

Related publications
The BREXIT 2016 Policy Analysis Series from the Centre for Economic Performance can be found here

Related links
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


The Daily Telegraph
Phonics is fair to all

SIR - I noted with interest the research from the London School of Economics into the use of synthetic phonics in schools.

Phonics is a highly effective method of helping children who are behind with reading to catch up. However, I strongly believe that this teaching method should be employed for all children, not just those ''at risk of struggling''. It is great if all children end up at the same stage by the age of 11 - but waiting until disadvantaged children have been identified might put that at risk.

Furthermore, phonics should continue to be taught beyond the age of 11. When children begin secondary school it is expected that they are able to read, when in fact all they have done so far is master the primary curriculum. I worry they are often underprepared to deal with unfamiliar, academic language independently.

Advanced phonics equips children with the skills to decode these words and gain a proper understanding of language.

Katy Parkinson
Founder, Sound Training
Middlesbrough, North Yorkshire

This letter to the Editor was published in The Daily Telegraph on April 26, 2016
Link to the opinion page here

Related publications
''Teaching to Teach'' Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Children and Young People Now
Phonics - A hit or a miss?

Here are two newspaper headlines from 25 April 2016:
The Guardian: Reading boosted by phonics, study says
The Daily Telegraph: Phonics test 'does not improve reading'

If ever there was evidence needed for education in the interpretation of media messages, this coverage would be really useful!

The London School of Economics study looked at the progress of 270,000 children across 150 local authorities which introduced phonics at different times. As such, it is really powerful research - I am a fan of such large cohort studies, which in many ways are the gold standard of educational research. (Randomised Control Trials are much more difficult to implement in education - health is easier, where you can have a white pill that might be a placebo or an active medicine, and no-one knows, even the doctor administering the pill, but in education, everyone knows what method is being used.)

This article was published online by Children & Young People Now on April 26, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Daily Express
Important to trust teachers

Experienced teachers who’d been perfectly content with their old methods were forced to jettison their tried and trusted methods and embrace phonics. A new study at the London School of Economics, however, shows those taught to read by other methods achieve the same standard as synthetics phonics pupils by the age of 11.

This article appeared in the Daily Express on 26 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage

BBC Radio Ulster
Evening Extra

Sandra McNally interviewed for the drivetime show, discussing recently published research on teaching reading with 'synthetic phonics'.

This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Ulster's Evening Extra programme on April 26, 2016
Link to the broadcast here. [Segment begins at 01:24.57]

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Telegraph online
Teaching phonics does not improve children's reading skills, landmark study shows

Traditional teaching methods championed by Government do not improve children's reading skills, a landmark London School of Economics (LSE) study shows. Teaching children in a way in which words are broken down into their constituent parts, also known as phonics, does help those children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who don't have English as their first language. However, the method has had 'no measurable effect on pupils reading scores at age 11', the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) said. But the Government has defended phonics as a previous analysis of the results had shown that children taught using phonics are two years ahead of the national average.

This article was published by The Telegraph online on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Schools Week
'Inexpensive' phonics trial improves disadvantaged pupils' literacy

An ''inexpensive trial'' policy improved all pupils' literacy in the early years and had long-term effects on children who struggle with reading, a major new study has found. The ''teaching to teach'' literacy study, which sent phonics consultants to support primary school teachers and tracked 270,000 primary school children from reception to year 6, showed persistent effects on non-native English speakers and pupils eligible for free school meals. Study author Sandra McNally, Director of the Education and Skills Programme at the Centre for Economic Performance, said the ''inequality-reducing impact'' of the intervention alone justified the cost of implementation, which was ''much lower'' compared to other proven strategies such as reducing class size.

This article was published online by Schools Week on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
''Teaching to Teach'' Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Guardian
Reading boosted by phonics, study says

The study by the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics (LSE) is the first large-scale analysis of the effects of using the method, which teaches children to read by identifying and pronouncing sounds rather than individual letters.

This article appeared in The Guardian on 25 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Times
New way to teach reading is no better than the old

The phonics system used in all schools to teach children to read has no long-term benefits for the average child, a major study finds today. Government policy requires every primary school to use phonics as a way of teaching literacy to young children. They are taught the sounds made by letter groups and how to blend these together, allowing them to decode words. However, the universal benefit of the programme is called into question in a large-scale study, which tracked the progress of more than 270,000 pupils.

This article appeared in The Times on 25 April 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo, April 2016 Paper No' CEPDP1425

Related Links
Stephan Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Johns Hopkins University School of Education
Best evidence in brief: the long-term impact of phonics instruction

Welcome to the latest issue of Best Evidence in Brief, brought to you by the Johns Hopkins School of Education's Center for Research and Reform in Education and the Institute for Effective Education at The University of York. Every two weeks we provide a round-up of items of interest related to education research.
A working paper from the UK's Centre for Economic Performance considers the impact of the introduction of synthetic phonics in English schools.

This article was published online by Johns Hopkins University School of Education on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Capita
Synthetic phonics can improve reading skills, study claims

Using synthetic phonics to teach children how to read can have considerable long-term benefits for pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as a first language, according to a new study by the Centre for Economic Performance(CEP).
Researchers at the CEP, which is based at the London School of Economics (LSE), tracked the progress of more than 270,000 children in 150 local authorities. They found that children taught to read using phonics made better progress by age seven than those taught using other methods. However, those lagging behind would catch up later.

this article was published online by Capita on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
"Teaching to Teach" Literacy, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Daily Mail
Teaching children to read using phonics has 'significant benefits' in helping those from disadvantaged backgrounds or who have English as a second language

An assessment of more than 270,000 children by LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) discovered that those who were learning phonetically had developed far better by age seven than those using traditional methods.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 25, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'"Teaching to Teach" Literacy', Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally and Martina Viarengo, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1425, April 2016

Related links
Stephen Machin webpage
Sandra McNally webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Financial Times
Tim Harford: How politicians poisoned statistics

The frustrating thing is that politicians seem quite happy to ignore evidence - even when they have helped to support the researchers who produced it. For example, when the chancellor George Osborne announced in his budget last month that all English schools were to become academies, making them independent of the local government, he did so on the basis of faith alone. The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which funds numerous research projects, warned that on the question of whether academies had fulfilled their original mission of improving failing schools in poorer areas, ''our evidence suggests a mixed picture''. Researchers at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance had a blunter description of Osborne's new policy: ''a non-evidence based shot in the dark''.

This article was a published press release (online) by The Sutton Trust on April 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related articles
FT Magazine, April 14, 2016
How politicians poisoned statistics

Related publications
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
Academies 2: the New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Benefits Canada
How would Brexit impact the financial industry?

Whether Britain loses access to the single market depends on the terms of any exit. Under the optimistic scenario, Britain would join the European Economic Area as non-member countries like Norway and Switzerland have done, says Thomas Sampson, assistant professor of economics at the London School of Economics. Membership in that area provides full single-market access. Under the pessimistic scenario, Britain wouldn't join the European Economic Area. ''Then there would be bilateral negotiations between Britain and the EU over what kind of access Britain has,'' says Sampson.

This article was published online by Benefits Canada on April 15, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
The Impact of Brexit on Foreign Investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.3, April 2016
See the complete set of CEP Brexit Analysis research papers here.

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Trade Programme webpage
Growth Programme webpage


Chicago Tribune Online
Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


Chicago Tribune Online
Osborne warns of Brexit cost as leading economies raise concerns

Research for the London School of Economics Centre for Economic Performance, published on Friday, estimated that foreign direct investment in Britain could decline by 22 percent if voters choose to leave the EU, reducing incomes by about 3.4 percent. The analysis, carried out by Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, found that reduced access to the single market, complexities in coordination between headquarters and local branch offices and uncertainty over trade agreements with the EU would deter investors.

This article appeared in the Chicago Tribune on 15 April 2016. Link to article

Related publications
The impact of Brexit on foreign investment in the UK, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.03, April 2016
Life after Brexit : What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.02, February 2016
The consequences of Brexit for UK trade and living standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, March 2016

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


Times Higher Education
Cambridge college to fund disadvantaged students' living costs

Gill Wyness, lecturer in the economics of education at the UCL Institute of Education, said that St John's students would welcome the funding but warned that a move towards support coming from universities rather than the government was a ''worrying prospect''. Dr Wyness said that, since less prestigious universities had less money but more students from poorer backgrounds to support, the likely outcome was increased variation in the value of financial support, and increased income inequality in higher education.

This article was published online by the Times Higher Education on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Paying for Higher Education, Gill Wyness, CEP 2015 Election Analysis Paper No.26, March 2015

Related links
Gill Wyness webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


FT Magazine
How politicians poisoned statistics

The frustrating thing is that politicians seem quite happy to ignore evidence - even when they have helped to support the researchers who produced it. For example, when the chancellor George Osborne announced in his budget last month that all English schools were to become academies, making them independent of the local government, he did so on the basis of faith alone. The Sutton Trust, an educational charity which funds numerous research projects, warned that on the question of whether academies had fulfilled their original mission of improving failing schools in poorer areas, ''our evidence suggests a mixed picture''. Researchers at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance had a blunter description of Osborne's new policy: ''a non-evidence based shot in the dark''.

This article was published in the FT Magazine on April 14, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
Academies 2: the New Batch, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Huffington Post
Why phones don't belong in schools

There's no doubt that smartphones have remarkable capabilities which, in theory, could promote student learning. But the truth is that kids - in spite of the best efforts of parents and teachers - use their phones primarily to access digital amusements. ... It's therefore not surprising that a recent London School of Economics study found that schools which ban the use of phones experienced a substantial improvement in student test scores, with the researchers concluding that phones ''can have a negative impact on productivity through distraction''. Researchers found that phones hurt vulnerable students the most. Study co-author Dr. Richard Murphy, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Texas, reports: ''Allowing phones into schools would be the most damaging to low-achieving and low-income students, exacerbating any existing learning inequalities.''

This article was published online by The Huffington Post on April 12, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Ill communication: technology, distraction and student performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015
In brief... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

Related links
Richard Murphywebpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Mail online
The 'neglect' of Britain's young middle achievers: Government accused of ignoring needs of those who don't go to university

A generation of young, 'middle achievers' are being left behind by the Government because they do not go to university, a damning report has claimed. Most youngsters - 53% - do not go on to university or do A levels, yet their needs are often ignored by the Government, a Lords committee has concluded. This 'missing middle' of youngsters who take up jobs or vocational education are allowed to drift through life. They are often given poor career advice and locked into low paid jobs, the House of Lords committee on social mobility warned.

This article was published online by The Daily Mail on April 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility Report of Session 2015-16. 'Overlooked and Left Behind: improving the transition from school to work for the majority of young people' (PDF)
Key suggestions from oral witnesses include those from Professor Sandra McNally, Director of CVER.
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE written evidence: Response to the House of Lords Call for Evidence on ''Transitions from School to Work''

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Hilary Steedman webpage
CVER website
All CEP Responses to Government Inquiries and Consultations webpage


www.parliament.uk
Governments have failed a generation of young people, say Lords

53% of young people do not follow the 'traditional' academic route into work. This majority of young people are significantly overlooked in their transition for work by the education system and the focus on apprenticeships is not suitable for everyone, the House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility has found.

This article was published on the www.parliament.uk website on April 8, 2016
Link to the article here

Related publications
House of Lords Select Committee on Social Mobility Report of Session 2015-16. 'Overlooked and Left Behind: improving the transition from school to work for the majority of young people' (PDF)
Key suggestions from oral witnesses include those from Professor Sandra McNally, Director of CVER.
Centre for Vocational Education Research (CVER), LSE written evidence: Response to the House of Lords Call for Evidence on ''Transitions from School to Work''

Related links
Sandra McNally webpage
Claudia Hupkau webpage
Hilary Steedman webpage
CVER website
All CEP Responses to Government Inquiries and Consultations webpage


LSE Business Review
Students' university degree classification affect their pay later in life

There is a wage premium for getting a first or upper second, find Shqiponja Telhaj and colleagues
Since the early 1960s, with developments in the field of human capital research, analysis of the returns to education has established robust evidence of a strong positive association between earnings and years of schooling or level of qualification attained. But there has been little analysis of how returns vary according to the level of academic performance - for example, what US universities measure as students' 'grade point average' - conditional on the level of qualification.

This article was published by the LSE Business Review blog on April 1, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK', Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015
In brief... The rewards for getting a good degree, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 3, Winter 2015/16

Related links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Caledonian Trust PLC
Half yearly Report

In phase three, after the negotiated settlement, the economic effects are the subject of wide and varying analysis and speculation, based largely on the eventual outcome of the settlement. Put simply, there are two main variables: what will the settlement be and what are the effects of such a settlement? Most economic studies report that Brexit would damage the UK economy. Three recent reports from Centre for Economic Performance, the CBI/PWC and Oxford Economics all consider that in the worst case scenario the long-term effects would average about minus £4,000 per annum per household, while the best outcome would vary from minus £680 to plus £70. Martin Wolf, associate editor and chief economic commentator of the FT, forthright as usual, says: ''A vote for Brexit is a leap into the abyss''. UK Industry and Financial ''establishment'' figures are prominent amongst those predicting an unfavourable outcome for Brexit.

This Report was published by the Caledonian Trust PLC on March 31, 2016
Link to the Report here

Related publications
The complete series of Brexit Papers are available online here

Related links
Holger Breinlich webpage
Swati Dhingra webpage
Hanwei Huang webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
John Van Reenen webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Growth Programme webpage
Trade Programme webpage


LSE British Politics and Policy blog
Budget 2016: highly questionable whether the academisation of all schools is good policy

All schools will become academies, announced George Osborne in his 2016 Budget speech. But the impact of such mass rollout on students' performance is uncertain, explain Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin.

This article was published by the LSE British Politics and Policy blog on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
'Academies 2: the New Batch', Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1370, September 2015
'The Introduction of Academy Schools to England's Education', Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1368, August 2015
Academy schools and pupil outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2 Autumn 2015

Related links
Andrew Eyles webpage
Stephen Machin webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


The Times
We should ban smartphones from schools

Last year a London School of Economics study found that banning phones from school boosts exam results and benefits low-achieving and low-income pupils the most.

This article was published by The Times on March 16, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


WZVN-TV Online
Ban smart phones, improve student grades?

Technology certainly has its place in the classroom, but not when as a smartphone. According to a new study from the London School of Economics, banning smartphones was linked to improved test scores among students in the U.K. As researchers Richard Murphy and Louis-Philippe Beland told CNN, ''We found the impact of banning phones for these students equivalent to an additional hour a week in school, or to increasing the school year by five days.''

This interview was conducted by WZVN-TV Online on March 10, 2016
Link to story here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


theguardian.com
Fomo, stress and sleeplessness: are smartphones bad for students?

London School of Economics and Political Science recently produced a report that found that grades improved in schools that banned mobile phones. This effect was most pronounced for struggling students; however, trying to enforce this is a contentious issue for many students, parents and teachers.

This article was published online by theguardian.com on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015
Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015

Related links
Richard Murphy webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Nouse
Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


Nouse
Prosperity or equality? Neither

In an article entitled 'Be happy, pay more to the taxman', Professor Richard Layard argues that it is the income gap, rather than total wealth that is most pertinent to people's happiness. Studies show, writes Layard, that we are no happier than we were 50 years ago despite ''unparalleled economic growth''.

This article was published online by Nouse on March 8, 2016
Link to article here

Related links
Richard Layard webpage
Wellbeing Programme webpage


U.S. News and World Report
Arguments and allegations are flying as Britons grapple with how to vote in a June 23 referendum on whether to stay in the European Union or walk away

The London School of Economics' Center for Economic Policy[sic] has calculated that, even if trade barriers with other European countries do not significantly increase, per capita income in Britain will fall by between 1.1 percent and 3.1 percent after a Brexit. ''The possibility of trading more with the rest of the world can't offset the loss of trade with the EU,'' said the center's Thomas Sampson.

This article was published by U.S. News & World Report on March 5, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
Life after Brexit: What are the UK's options outside the European Union?, Swati Dhingra and Thomas Sampson, CEP Brexit Analysis No.01, February 2016
Should We Stay or Should We Go? The economic consequences of leaving the EU, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco I. P. Ottaviano and Thomas Sampson, CEP 2015 Election Analysis No.22, March 2015

Related links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Gianmarco Ottaviano webpage
Thomas Sampson webpage
Trade Programme webpage


BBC Radio Nottingham
Dr Swati Dhingra interviewed on freetrade

Dr Swati Dhingra interviewed on freetrade
This interview was broadcast by BBC Radio Nottingham on March 3, 2016
Link to broadcast here

Also on various other local BBC regional stations

Related publications
The Consequences of Brexit for UK Trade and Living Standards, Swati Dhingra, Gianmarco Ottaviano, Thomas Sampson and John Van Reenen, CEP Brexit Analysis Series Paper No.2, March 2016

Related Links
Swati Dhingra webpage
Trade Programme webpage


BBC News
Are billionaires more likely to be graduates?

And a study published this week by the Centre for Economic Performance at the LSE showed the link between degree grade and subsequent earning power in the UK.

This article was published online in BBC News on February 24, 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
In brief ... The rewards for getting a good degree, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 3, Winter 2015/16
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK, Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


Times Higher Education
Leverhulme Trust grant winners

Reference to Olma Silva from LSE winning £234,029 Leverhulme Project research grant to identify causal effect of accelerator programmes

This article appeared in Times Higher Education on 18 February 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Olmo Silva webpage
Education and Skills webpage

Student Times
Better Degrees Really Do Help You Earn More

The study shows that those who get a first or a 2:1 - earn more than those getting a 2:2 or a third. It looked at graduates who were born in 1970 and graduated in 1991, and found those with first of 2:1 degrees earned 7-9 per cent more five years after graduation. The study, published by the London School of Economics, also found that the gap between earnings according to university performance is also widening as more people opt for a university education.

This article appeared on Student Times on 16 February 2016. Link to article

Related Publications
Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith, Shqiponja Telhaj, November 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1392

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills webpage

The Observer
Why it really does pay to get a good degree: you earn more

The study, Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK, published by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, finds that, five years after university, graduates who qualified with a 2:1 or higher can expect to earn 7%-9% more than their counterparts with inferior degrees.

This article was published in The Observer on February 14 2016
Link to article here

Related Publications
'Graduate Returns, Degree Class Premia and Higher Education Expansion in the UK', Robin Naylor, Jeremy Smith and Shqiponja Telhaj, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1392, November 2015

Related Links
Shqiponja Telhaj webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage


La Reppublica
Padre licenziato? I figli vanno male a scuola

C'è un costo addizionale della disoccupazione dei padri: il crollo del rendimento scolastico dei figli. Lo sostiene un'economista spagnola, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, del Centre for Economic Performance - London School of Economics: sulla base di una lunga indagine condotta su 358 studenti che frequentavano la scuola dell'obbligo nella provincia di Barcellona, e che ha coperto cinque anni scolastici, dal 2007-2008 fino al 2011-2012, Valenzuola è arrivata alla conclusione che la perdita del lavoro del padre si traduce in una diminuzione del rendimento scolastico pari al 13% rispetto alla deviazione standard. "Quest'effetto - spiega l'economista sul sito "Nada es gratis" - varia a seconda del sottogruppo considerato: si concentra, e l'ampiezza è anche maggiore, tra gli studenti i cui genitori hanno un livello d'istruzione più basso e soffrono maggiori periodi di disoccupazione".

This article appeared in La Reppublica on 28 January 2016 Link to article

Related Publications
Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, July 2015 Paper No' CEPDP1364

Related Links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education webpage

Politikon
El impacto intergeneracional de la pérdida de trabajo parental durante la crisis, by Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela

Las noticias sobre el mercado laboral, y en particular sobre la evolución de la tasa de paro, han ocupado telediarios y no pocos artículos de prensa desde el inicio de la crisis en España. Cómo resumía en esta entrada en NEG, la evidencia empírica ha mostrado efectos desfavorables de la pérdida de trabajo para el propio trabajador (v.g., pérdidas salariales a corto plazo que parecen persistir en el largo plazo, mayor riesgo de divorcio o peor salud mental y física).

This article appeared in Politikon on 26 January 2016. Link to article

Related Links
Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education webpage

Nada es Gratis (Spain)
¿Afecta la pérdida de trabajo de los padres a las notas de los niños?

Jeni Ruiz-Valenzuela's blog article on the negative effect of fathers' unemployment on their children based on Spain's great recession.

This article was published by The Nada es Gratis blog (Spain) on January 13, 2016
Link to article here

Related publications
In brief...Parental job loss: the impact on children's school performance, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela. Article in CentrePiece, Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015
'Job Loss at Home: Children's School Performance During the Great Recession in Spain', Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1364, July 2015

Related links Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela webpage
Education and Skills Programme webpage