CEE in the News 2017


BBC News
Call for mobile phone ban in Scottish primary schools

Mobile phones should be banned from primary schools, according to the Scottish Conservatives.

Scottish Conservative MSP Michelle Ballantyne urged the government to overhaul this guidance, calling for an outright ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if head teachers deem it necessary. The South Scotland MSP highlighted research from academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning phones in high schools in England.


Scottish Daily Mail
Heads ''need to be able to ban phones''

Snippet: ...Scottish MSP Michelle Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics into the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones ‘subsequently experience an improvement in test scores’ and it ‘improves outcomes for the low-achieving students the most’.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015

 


Scotsman
MSP wants headteachers to be allowed to ban mobiles in school

Headteachers should have the power to ban mobile phones in schools, a Tory MSP has said. South Scotland MSP Michelle Ballantyne has urged the Scottish Government to overhaul its 2013 guidance on the use of mobile devices in schools. She wants a ban on phones in primary schools and the introduction of restrictions on their use in secondary schools if headteachers deem it necessary. Ms Ballantyne highlighted research by academics at the London School of Economics which explored the impact of banning mobile phones in schools. The authors concluded schools that restrict access to mobile phones “subsequently experience an improvement in test scores”.


Times Educational Supplement - TES
More autonomy turned out to be mere rhetoric

The rise of academies promised more power for schools - but, with government still clinging to the reins, heads haven't been able to raise standards as expected. However, this system may yet deliver - if ministers ring the changes, writes James Croft.

The Academies Act of 2010 purported to take school autonomy to a new level. The jury is still out on whether this could make a difference for pupil outcomes, but doubts have, justifiably, begun to emerge. While there is evidence of a positive impact in pre-2010 sponsored academies, recent research from the London School of Economics finds no trace of post-conversion improvement in previously "good", "satisfactory" or "inadequate" converters, as well as a concerning degree of heterogeneity.


RES (Royal Economic Society) Newsletter
Conference Report 2017 'Divided we fall'

Perhaps the public knew that Brexit would drain their wallets, but voted for it anyway. Sometimes it’s not the economy, stupid. But Simon Wren-Lewis, of Oxford University, rubbished this idea, pointing out that those who voted for Brexit said they were unwilling to pay to reduce immigration. Instead, people seemed misinformed. Not only did those who voted to leave the EU think that they would be no worse off as a result, they thought that lower immigration would improve their access to public services. The problem, Mr Wren-Lewis argued, was with the media. Dismissing a large fraction as producers of propoganda, he reserved most disappointment for the BBC. It failed to communicate the consensus among economists, he said, treating it as opinion rather than knowledge. Swati Dhingra, of the London School of Economics, agreed, saying that the BBC’s quest to generate balance gave the false impression that there was a meaningful debate between economists. (Depressingly, she noted that this false balance had oozed into policymaking, as select committees are being stacked with pro-Brexit voices.)

Breakfast means breakfast

Amid the pastries, the presentations and the self-flagellation, it might have been easy to forget what the point of it all. An article in The Independent, previewing the conference, and highlighted by Paul Johnson on the first day of the conference, provided a helpful reminder. ‘Economics research can really improve people’s lives’, wrote Hamish McRae. While the public associates economics with GDP and abstract equations, much of the research presented at the conference was focused on how to make people’s lives better. Examples I saw included a paper presented by Christine Farquharson of the IFS, which suggested that free school breakfasts are a cheap way to help children do better in school. A panel discussion on re-skilling the UK between Steve Machin, Kirabo Jackson, Richard Burgess and Sandra McNally tossed around tax credits for investment in skills and training, a plea for more thinking about teacher quality, and from Kirabo Jackson, to think about the education system as a whole, rather than separate, substitutable stages. Football scheduling was on the list too: boys perform worse in exams when they coincide with international football tournaments.


Le Monde (France)
Rythmes scolaires : « Le retour à la semaine de quatre jours risque de se faire aux dépens des femmes/School rythms : « The return to the four-day week may be at the expense of women

The two economists, Emma Duchini and Clémentine Van Effenterre, who speak in the "World", believe that this reform did not take into account the interest of parents, especially mothers.


The UK in a Changing Europe (Kings College London)
Brexit and the skills challenge

Article by Sandra McNally

The UK’s productivity suffered a shock in 2008 from which it has not recovered, and the ‘skills problem’ needs to be addressed. Within the context of a broader industrial strategy, improving skills is part of the solution – but Brexit may well harm these efforts if the feared negative economic effects put additional pressure on public finances. Likewise, Brexit will not help if prolonged uncertainty discourages employer investment in skills; nor if employers substitute capital for labour as a response to migration barriers. However, Brexit does do is bring the skills problem into sharper focus.


Education Policy Institute
The impact of academies on educational outcomes

The Education Policy Institute (EPI) has published a new paper examining the impact of academies on educational outcomes. The comprehensive report brings together EPI’s own analysis, along with research undertaken by the London School of Economics.

Our principal finding through this extensive study is that academies do not provide an automatic solution to school improvement. As we demonstrate throughout this report, there is significant variation in performance at both different types of academies and Multi-Academy Trusts.

Related publications

The Impact of Academies on Educational Outcomes, Jon Andrews and Natalie Perera with Andrew Eyles, Gabriel Heller Sahlgren, Stephen Machin, Matteo Sandi and Olmo Silva, Education Policy Institute and London School of Economics and Political Science Report, July 2017

https://epi.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/EPI_-Impact_of_Academies_Consolidated_Report.pdf

Primary Academies in England’, Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Sandra McNally. Article in CentrePiece Volume 21, Issue 3, Winter 2016

Academy Schools and Pupil Outcomes, Andrew Eyles and Stephen Machin. Article in CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 2, Autumn 2015

 


The Review of Economic Studies, Volume 84, Issue 3, July 2017
''High'' Achievers? Cannabis Access and Academic Performance

Olivier Marie and Ulf Zölitz


Kashmir Observer
How Mobile Phones (Mis)Use Is Affecting Our Health and Social Fabric

There are other consequences of using mobile phones as well. A research published by London School of Economics argues that banning pupils from carrying mobile phones in schools showed a sustained improvement in exam results, with the biggest advances coming from struggling students.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015


Time
The continuing urgency of the Grenfell Tower inferno

In the days since the fire, Grenfell Tower has been held up as a tragic symbol of the social ills facing Britain: a detached political class; nearly seven years of a government-led austerity program that has sliced through the country’s welfare state; rising socioeconomic disparities; and a hastening decline in living standards. The U.K. has seen the biggest drop in average real wages in OECD countries except for Greece, according to an analysis by the London School of Economics’ Centre for Economic Performance.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


UniteWorks – Unite the Union
Unite warns of deepening Tory ‘wage pain' as average wages continue to fall

Theresa May and the Tories’ ‘wage pain’ is leaving millions of people struggling to make ends meet warned Britain’s largest union, Unite as official figures out today (Wednesday 14 June) showed a deepening wage squeeze. Official labour market figures out today showed that average earnings, excluding bonuses, fell in real terms by 0.6 per cent compared to a year earlier. The figures follow an analysis by the London School of Economics of OECD data showing the UK had suffered the biggest drop in average wages between 2007 and 2015 of any developed country except austerity-ravaged Greece.

Related publications

‘Real wages and living standards in the UK’. Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. 036, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf


Geschichte der Gegenwart (Germany)
May will Regierung bilden – Brexit-Verhandlungen ab 19. Juni

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain part of the EU’s common market.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 

 


Frankfurter Rundschau (Germany)
Die schlechteste Variante

A year ago, in June 2016, the British voted on their country's EU membership. Economists and financial markets were in bright turmoil and warned of the consequences of a Brexit. Today, twelve months later, the markets are no longer afraid of the Brexit. They fear for him. Only two years are left to the EU and the United Kingdom to agree on the conditions of the withdrawal. And with each passing day there is a growing likelihood that the horror scenario will occur: there is no agreement, no deal--"for the British economy, this would be the worst of all results," warns the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP).

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                         


Berliner Zeitung (Germany)
Horrorszenario „No Deal'': Keine Brexit-Einigung wäre für die britische Wirtschaft fatal/Horror scenario „No Deal'' no Brexit agreement would be fatal for the British economy

erall, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1 900 pounds.

Also in:

Kölner Stadt-Anzeiger

Furcht vor dem Desaster; BREXIT Großbritannien droht eine schwere Rezession, wenn es keine Einigung mit der EU gibt

In total, the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) calculates, it would be best for the British economy to remain in spite of Brexit part of the EU's common market. This, too, would incur costs, but in the case of a no-deal scenario, these costs would double. The British trade with the EU would break by 40 percent over the next ten years. The overall effect amounted to just under three percent of British per capita income. Every household on the island would cost about 1900 pounds.

http://www.ksta.de/wirtschaft/brexit-furcht-vor-dem-desaster-27764024

 

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

                                         

Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp


Professional Adviser
The evidence for Brexit and other key election issues - LSE

The London School of Economics (LSE) has published a report assessing all of the party manifestos and how respective policies will affect key voter issues.

Intended to be "objective, brief and non-technical", the report by the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance looks at the evidence on the most-talked-about policies, including education, health, immigration, industrial strategy, living standards, regional policy and Brexit.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, Stephen Machin and Romesh Vaitilingam (Eds), CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 Related links

Trade Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/trade/default.asp

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

                                        


Economic Journal, Volume 127, Issue 602, June 2017
‘Adjusting Your Dreams? High School Plans and Dropout Behaviour'

Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin

 

Related publications

‘in brief… What can be done to help low-Achieving teenagers?’ Dominique Goux, Marc Gurgand and Eric Maurin.  Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 1, Spring 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/cp499.pdf


Financial Times
Manifesto economics

For the first time in years, UK voters have a real choice between economic models

The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics has published a series of election analyses, looking at wages and living standards, health and social care, education and skills, and inequality between UK regions.

Related publications

‘#GE2017Economists: The Research Evidence on Key Issues for Voters in the 2017 UK General Election’, CEP 2017 General Election Analyses Paper No. EA044, June 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea044.pdf

 

Related links

Urban and Spatial Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/urban/default.asp

 


RT (Russia)
British wages in free fall, only crisis-hit Greece is worse in OECD

According to a London School of Economics (LSE) paper, Brits were the worst off when it came to their real wages, with pay falling by more than five percent between 2007 and 2015.

Researchers for the prestigious British university also found that all types of British earners, with the exception of pensioners and minimum wage workers, were no better off today than they were in 2008.


Independent
Parents reduced to crowdfunding for whiteboards due to education cuts

Following years of government budget cuts, parents are now turning to crowdfunding websites in order to provide basic school supplies. Appeals have been launched on websites including Justgiving.com for online donations towards items such as whiteboards and computers, as well as to pay for crossing attendents. … Prime Minister has echoed this claim several times, stating in an interview with Andrew Marr: “The level of funding going into schools is at record level.”  However, Professor Sandra McNally from the School of Economics, University of Surrey, published an article​ fact-checking this “highest level on record” claim.  She explains that only the “per pupil expenditure” (the amount spent on each pupil) is relevant, rather than the total amount of money available. According to Professor McNally, current spending per pupil was “largely frozen in real terms” between 2010 and 2016.  And as onward spending is frozen in cash terms, this will likely lead to a “real terms reduction of around 6.5 per cent by 2019-2020”.

Related links

Sandra McNally CEP publications webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/publications/author.asp?author=mcnally


Independent
The chart that shows UK workers have had the worst wage performance in the OECD except Greece

The UK has suffered the biggest drop in average real wages of any OECD country except depression-wracked Greece, according to a pre-general election analysis published by the London School of Economics.

The LSE's Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) uses OECD data to show that average wages for British workers, when adjusted for inflation, fell by more than 5 per cent between 2007 and 2015..

Related publications

'Real Wages and Living Standards in the UK', Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP Election Analysis Paper No' CEPEA036: , May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea036.pdf

'The Return of Falling Real Wages' David Blanchflower, Rui Costa, Stephen Machin, CEP report, May 2017 

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf

 


Market News
UK reality check: BOE wage growth forecasts implausible: CEP

Bank of England Monetary Policy Committee claims that nominal wage growth will return close to 4% by 2019 are "rather implausible and over-optimistic", according to two respected academics at the Centre for Economic Performance. Interviewed for the latest MNI Reality Check, Professor Stephen Machin, Director of the CEP, along with Rui Costa, a fellow researcher at the body, said that existing pressures would not alleviate enough over the near-term horizon to justify the MPC's prediction laid out in the Bank's latest Inflation Report, published earlier this month.


Brighton and Hove News
Hundreds turn out for Save Our Schools rally

According to Sandra McNally, professor of economics at Surrey University, the Conservatives’ figures are misleading. This is because the “per pupil figure” was frozen from 2010 to 2011 and again from 2015 to 2016.

She argues that an increase in the core funding for schools is not the same as an increase in the amount per pupil. A freeze in cash terms is likely to result in a reduction in real terms of 6.5 per cent between 2010 and 2020. This reduction has not happened yet and school funding has doubled in the last 20 years

Related publications

CEP Election Analysis: Education and Skills: The UK Policy Agenda, Sandra McNally and Gill Wyness,June 2017 Paper No' CEPEA041. http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/ea041.pdf

Related links

CEP Election 2017 webpage: http://cep.lse.ac.uk/election2017/default.asp

 

 


ccrmagazine.com
Centre for Economic Performance report on UK pay and living standards

Higher price inflation as a result of sterling’s depreciation following the vote to leave the EU, coupled with nominal wage growth stuck at a norm of 2% a year, means that once again the UK faces falling real wages, threatening family living standards.  A new report from the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) – the first in a series of background briefings on key policy issues in the June 2017 UK general election – outlines what’s been happening to real wages and living standards, and considers relevant policies in the parties’ election manifestos.


Lkm – The Education and Youth ‘think and action-tank' – The LKMco Podcast
#002 – Research Round Up: Social segregation and white Working Class boys

In episode #002  Dr Sam Baars talks to George Duoblys. They ask do faith schools perpetuate social social segregation? Is focusing on white working class boys helpful? Do Ofsted’s gradings for nurseries really measure the right things?  Centre for Economic Performance research by Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally mentioned in the video.

Related publications

‘Quality in Early Years Settings and Children’s School Achievement’, Jo Blanden, Kirstine Hansen and Sandra McNally, Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1468, February 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/dp1468.pdf


NIESR Blog
Britain's skills problem

Article by Sandra McNally

It is well known and acknowledged in the government’s Industrial Strategy that Britain has a skills problem: ‘We have a shortage of technical-level skills and rank 16th out of 20 countries for the proportion of people with technical qualifications’. As the Green Paper also says, ‘a bewildering complex array of qualifications, some of which are poor quality, makes the system hard to use for students and employers’. This shortage of ‘technical level skills’ is important because it impacts on economic growth, inequality and social mobility. It also affects a lot of people. Well over half of young people do not do A-levels each year. Furthermore, only about 35-40% of a typical cohort finishing their GCSEs can expect to go to university. The shortage of ‘technical skills’ mainly needs to be supplied by those who choose non-academic pathways. This is a major educational issue and all parties should be addressing it in their manifestos.

Related publications

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002795011724000113

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


The Debrief
New report suggests there's bad news on the horizon for the UK job market

David Blanchflower, a former Bank of England policymaker and a London School of Economics professor, is saying that wages are likely to remain low for several years. He’s particularly critical of how the Bank of England is handling the situation, as their forecasting for wage growth consistently expects it to revert to around 4% within 18 months which, at least for the last 10 forecasts, just hasn’t happened.

 

Related publications

‘The Return of Falling Real Wages’, David Blanchflower, Rui Costa and Stephen Machin, Real Wages Update blog No.6, May 2017

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/pubs/download/rwu006.pdf


Fiscal Studies
‘Academies 2: The New Batch - The Changing Nature of Academy Schools in England'

Andrew Eyles, Stephen Machin and Olmo Silva

Accepted manuscript online: 27 May 2017

DOI: 10.1111/j.1475-5890.2017.12146


National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017
‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

Related publications

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


SurreyBaby
‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Attending a nursery with an outstanding Ofsted rating has ‘limited benefits’ for children’s education, says new research from the University of Surrey. The report, published last month, showed that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if they had been taught by a qualified teacher or attended an outstanding nursery. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), looked at the information of 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.


Yahoo! News
Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

Research has shown that phonics can boost children’s reading age by an average of 28 months by the time they turn seven. Boys benefit the most from the back-to-basics system and actually overtake girls after just two years of school, according to a study by Dr Marlynne Grant, an educational psychologist, who analysed the performance of pupils taught to read using synthetic phonics from the reception year upwards. The school had high levels of special educational needs. However, a study by London School of Economics last year found that while phonics help children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as their first language, it has had "no measurable effect on pupils’ reading scores at age 11".

 

Related links

Martina Viarengo webpage:  http://personal.lse.ac.uk/viarengo/


CEP Engagement/In politics
CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


FE Week
Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

The government is refusing to say whether more funding will be given to two “pioneering” FE research centres after their start-up grants end shortly.

Meanwhile, the Centre for Vocational Education Research is beginning to publish its own projects after being given a £3 million government grant in May 2015. Dr Sandra McNally leads the centre, and said that in the two years it has been running, her team has focused on “huge administrative data”, such as individual learner records, the national pupil database and longitudinal education outcomes data, in an attempt to process, code and apply it to their research.


Europe 1
Should we ban cell phones in school?

A brake to the concentration. Still, according to a study of 2015 to the United Kingdom by the London School of Economics, the use of the current mobile phone impair concentration. The study, which looked at the school results of 130,000 students 91 institutions of the country, shows that students enrolled in schools that have banned mobile phone have better results than those enrolled in institutions where the smartphone is not banned. And the students the less comfortable at the school who in would suffer the most, explain the researchers.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Repubblica.it
Irrinunciabile smartphone. ''Ma i divieti non servono''/Essential smartphone. ''But the bans are not needed''

Research by the London School of Economics in 2015 calculated that at maturity, in schools where the mobile phone is banned, the boys get ratings of 6.4% higher.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Le Huffington Post (France)
Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

According to a study published in the journal of the London School of Economics in may 2015, the ban on mobiles in schools would be beneficial for the academic performance of students. Researchers have shown that in schools that forbid it, results improved by 6.4 percent compared to other schools. In the United Kingdom, more and more schools ban their speakers mobile: they were 50% in 2012 and 98% in 2012 to prohibit them or collect them earlier today, according to the Guardian.

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015.


Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk
LSE research mentioned in Parliamentary Question on graduate nursery teachers

The question was tabled on 22 February by Lord Blencathra (Con):

"What is their response to the conclusions of a recent report by LSE and Surrey University that graduate nursery teachers for three- to five-year-olds make a small impact on children's attainment compared to non=graduates; and whether they have any plans to review their policy regarding requirements for nursery staff to be graduates."


Gulf News
6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

A majority six of ten Gulf News poll respondents think children should be banned from using social media sites altogether. Their opinion is in line with the findings of a study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, in the UK. Researchers found that banning mobile phones from school premises caused test scores of students to improve by 6.4 per cent — the equivalent of adding five days to the school year.


Get Surrey
Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

University of Surrey's economics senior lecturer, Dr Jo Blanden, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief these are important for children's learning. "Our research finding that having a graduate working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us. "It is possible it is driven by the types of qualifications held by those working in private nurseries, they are not generally equivalent to the qualifications of teachers in nursery classes in schools."  The study was conducted by researchers at the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London.

 


BBC Radio Shropshire
Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

…and there's a good piece on the BBC news website if you have a look at it so the couple of days so it is very current and it says gradual nursery staff have little effect on children OK having a graduate teacher industry only has a limited impact on children's attainment this is new research from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London school of economics.


Day Nurseries
Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Save the Children has disputed research which found nurseries with a qualified nursery teacher have only a “tiny effect” on children’s attainment.

Earlier this week, researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, found that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate had an Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP) score that was only around a third of a point higher than those whose nurseries did not employ a graduate. The total number of points available is 117. Lead author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at Surrey University, said: “Our research finding that having a member of staff qualified to graduate level working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us, given existing research that finds well-qualified staff have higher quality interactions with children.” However, Save the Children has claimed that children without an early years teacher are almost 10 per cent less likely to meet the expected levels of development when they start school compared to children who do have a teacher. This comes from its ‘Untapped Potential’ report last November.


Manchester Evening News
What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

A university study says that inspectors are failing to spot the best and worst nursery schools by using 'traditional methods'

Parents have defended a pre-school rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted as a report shows the watchdog’s inspections don’t always reveal the best nurseries. The report published this week shows that sending children to an ‘outstanding’ nursery makes barely any difference to how well they develop in their early years. Researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Sussex and University College London, discovered that traditional measures used to evaluate nursery schools by inspectors failed to spot the best or worst schools.


Day Nurseries
'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

The report titled 'Nursery Quality: New evidence of the impact on children’s outcomes', found that staff qualifications and Ofsted ratings cannot predict the quality of early years education, arguing that conventional methods of testing quality do not have a significant influence on educational outcomes. Co-author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at the University of Surrey, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief that these are important for children’s learning.


Phys.Org
New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

A report published today reveals that a child's educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, matches data on children's outcomes at the end of reception with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.

 


BBC News - Education
Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Having a graduate teacher in a nursery has only a limited impact on children's attainment, new research suggests.

In England the government wants more graduate staff in nurseries in a bid to boost children's literacy and numeracy. But a study published by the London School of Economics (LSE) claims highly qualified staff had only a "tiny" effect on attainment. One early years group said the the report challenged "many of the assumptions" around current policy. The researchers, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, Surrey University and University College London, looked at figures, drawn from the National Pupil Database, on about 1.8 million five-year-olds who started school in England between 2008 and 2011.


The Daily Telegraph (Print edition)
Pulling rank Top nurseries fail to raise prospects

Sending children to a nursery school rated “outstanding” by Ofsted makes barely any difference to how well they develop, researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London discovered.

[Link unavailable.]


BT.com
Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, Surrey University and University College London, compared data on children's results with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million youngsters born in England between September 2003 and August 2006. The findings showed that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate have a teacher assessment score around a third of a point higher, where the total number of points available was 117.


Nursery World
Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

New research finds that attending an outstanding nursery, or one with graduate staff, has a limited benefit to children's educational attainment.

The study of 1.8 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006, reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only ‘slightly’ higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or Early Years Professional (EYP).

It also found that attending a nursery rated outstanding by Ofsted had limited benefits.


TES
Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Children with graduate nursery teachers achieve only slightly more by the end of Reception than children with unqualified teachers

Children who have access to a qualified teacher at nursery school do only slightly better at age 5 than those who do not, research suggests.

A new study concludes that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their Reception year is only very slightly higher if they have been taught in a nursery with a teacher trained to graduate level.

There was also little difference between those attending a nursery rated "outstanding" by Ofsted and others.

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, compared data on children's results with information about the nurseries they attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million people born in England between September 2003 and August 2006.


BBC Radio 4
The Today Programme

Dr Hilary Steedman discusses IFS report criticising huge investment into apprenticeships.

0725
Is the way in which the Government will fund new apprenticeships a monumental waste of money? Dr Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow at LSE specialising in apprenticeships.

 


Personnel Today
Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at The London School of Economics, speaking on the BBC’s Today programme, said: “I think the IFS has really overstated their case here. We have a really serious skills problem in this country and we need to raise skills through apprenticeships in order to promote economic growth and improve our productivity levels, which are dire compared to Europe.”


20 Minutos blog
Perder el empleo baja la nota media de los hijos

La inestabilidad de los contratos y el desempleo de los padres tienen efectos negativos en el rendimiento educativo de sus hijos. Es una de las principales conclusiones de un estudio elaborado por la investigadra catalana Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, del Centre for Economic Performance, de la London School of Economics.

Read pdf of the article here


Gainsborough Standard
Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

However another study from the London School of Economics suggests a ban on phones has the effect of an extra week of classes over a pupil’s school year.

 

Also in:

Retford Today

Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

 


BBC Radio Leeds
Snippet...

A recent study found a ban on phones generally helps classroom performance research by the London school of economics found that after schools outlawed mobiles test scores of pupils aged 16 improved by 6.4 %.