CEE in the News 2017


NIESR Blog
Britain's skills problem

Article by Sandra McNally

It is well known and acknowledged in the government’s Industrial Strategy that Britain has a skills problem: ‘We have a shortage of technical-level skills and rank 16th out of 20 countries for the proportion of people with technical qualifications’. As the Green Paper also says, ‘a bewildering complex array of qualifications, some of which are poor quality, makes the system hard to use for students and employers’. This shortage of ‘technical level skills’ is important because it impacts on economic growth, inequality and social mobility. It also affects a lot of people. Well over half of young people do not do A-levels each year. Furthermore, only about 35-40% of a typical cohort finishing their GCSEs can expect to go to university. The shortage of ‘technical skills’ mainly needs to be supplied by those who choose non-academic pathways. This is a major educational issue and all parties should be addressing it in their manifestos.

Related publications

‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

http://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1177/002795011724000113

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


National Institute Economic Review, 240(1), May 2017
‘Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications'

Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura

DOI: 10.1177/002795011724000113

Related publications

Post-Compulsory Education in England: Choices and Implications Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura, CVER Discussion Paper No.1, July 2016

Post-16 educational choices in England’, Claudia Hupkau, Sandra McNally, Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela and Guglielmo Ventura. Article in CentrePiece Volume 22, Issue 2, Autumn 2016


SurreyBaby
‘Outstanding' nurseries may not be the best, says new research

Attending a nursery with an outstanding Ofsted rating has ‘limited benefits’ for children’s education, says new research from the University of Surrey. The report, published last month, showed that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if they had been taught by a qualified teacher or attended an outstanding nursery. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP), looked at the information of 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.


Yahoo! News
Phonics were being taught 350 years ago, one of world's oldest children's book reveals

Research has shown that phonics can boost children’s reading age by an average of 28 months by the time they turn seven. Boys benefit the most from the back-to-basics system and actually overtake girls after just two years of school, according to a study by Dr Marlynne Grant, an educational psychologist, who analysed the performance of pupils taught to read using synthetic phonics from the reception year upwards. The school had high levels of special educational needs. However, a study by London School of Economics last year found that while phonics help children from disadvantaged backgrounds and those who do not have English as their first language, it has had "no measurable effect on pupils’ reading scores at age 11".

 

Related links

Martina Viarengo webpage:  http://personal.lse.ac.uk/viarengo/


CEP Engagement/In politics
CEP and its research had a broad reach in Parliament during the month of February.

During the passage of the European Union (Notification of Withdrawal) Bill in the Lords, research on the benefits from immigration at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) was mentioned.

Also, LSE research was picked up during debates on building more homes (Professor Cheshire)

pre-school education: teachers (Dr Jo Blanden, Professor Sandra McNally).

LSE has been particularly involved in the debate on Brexit through its submissions of written evidence in Parliament and academics appearing before select committees. LSE has responded to the Impact of Brexit on Higher Education and the Immigration inquiries.

Swati Dhingra and Professor Niamh Moloney gave their insights on UK Trade Options Beyond 2019

Professor Alan Manning and Philippe Legrain informed the Lords on Brexit and the Labour Market.

Related links

Community Programme webpage:  http://cep.lse.ac.uk/_new/research/Community/default.asp

 

 


FE Week
Government silent on adult skills behavioural research centre funding

The government is refusing to say whether more funding will be given to two “pioneering” FE research centres after their start-up grants end shortly.

Meanwhile, the Centre for Vocational Education Research is beginning to publish its own projects after being given a £3 million government grant in May 2015. Dr Sandra McNally leads the centre, and said that in the two years it has been running, her team has focused on “huge administrative data”, such as individual learner records, the national pupil database and longitudinal education outcomes data, in an attempt to process, code and apply it to their research.


Europe 1
Should we ban cell phones in school?

A brake to the concentration. Still, according to a study of 2015 to the United Kingdom by the London School of Economics, the use of the current mobile phone impair concentration. The study, which looked at the school results of 130,000 students 91 institutions of the country, shows that students enrolled in schools that have banned mobile phone have better results than those enrolled in institutions where the smartphone is not banned. And the students the less comfortable at the school who in would suffer the most, explain the researchers.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Repubblica.it
Irrinunciabile smartphone. ''Ma i divieti non servono''/Essential smartphone. ''But the bans are not needed''

Research by the London School of Economics in 2015 calculated that at maturity, in schools where the mobile phone is banned, the boys get ratings of 6.4% higher.

Related Publications

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy.


Le Huffington Post (France)
Macron veut durcir la loi qui encadre l'usage du portable à l'école, mais qu'en est-il aujourd'hui?/ Macron wants to tighten the law that oversees the use of the laptop to school, but what about today?

According to a study published in the journal of the London School of Economics in may 2015, the ban on mobiles in schools would be beneficial for the academic performance of students. Researchers have shown that in schools that forbid it, results improved by 6.4 percent compared to other schools. In the United Kingdom, more and more schools ban their speakers mobile: they were 50% in 2012 and 98% in 2012 to prohibit them or collect them earlier today, according to the Guardian.

In brief ... Phone home: should mobiles be banned in schools?, Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy, CentrePiece Volume 20, Issue 1, Summer 2015 'Ill Communication: Technology, Distraction and Student Performance', Louis-Philippe Beland and Richard Murphy Centre for Economic Performance Discussion Paper No.1350, May 2015.


Parliamentary Business – www.parliament.uk
LSE research mentioned in Parliamentary Question on graduate nursery teachers

The question was tabled on 22 February by Lord Blencathra (Con):

"What is their response to the conclusions of a recent report by LSE and Surrey University that graduate nursery teachers for three- to five-year-olds make a small impact on children's attainment compared to non=graduates; and whether they have any plans to review their policy regarding requirements for nursery staff to be graduates."


Gulf News
6 in 10 say ban children from social networks

A majority six of ten Gulf News poll respondents think children should be banned from using social media sites altogether. Their opinion is in line with the findings of a study by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, in the UK. Researchers found that banning mobile phones from school premises caused test scores of students to improve by 6.4 per cent — the equivalent of adding five days to the school year.


Get Surrey
Attending ‘outstanding' nursery has limited benefit for children, university research reveals

University of Surrey's economics senior lecturer, Dr Jo Blanden, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief these are important for children's learning. "Our research finding that having a graduate working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us. "It is possible it is driven by the types of qualifications held by those working in private nurseries, they are not generally equivalent to the qualifications of teachers in nursery classes in schools."  The study was conducted by researchers at the Centre of Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London.

 


BBC Radio Shropshire
Research from LSE says graduate nursery staff have little effect on children's attainment.

…and there's a good piece on the BBC news website if you have a look at it so the couple of days so it is very current and it says gradual nursery staff have little effect on children OK having a graduate teacher industry only has a limited impact on children's attainment this is new research from the Centre of Economic Performance at the London school of economics.


Day Nurseries
Charity disputes research which claims qualified nursery teachers have ‘tiny effect' on children's learning

Save the Children has disputed research which found nurseries with a qualified nursery teacher have only a “tiny effect” on children’s attainment.

Earlier this week, researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, found that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate had an Early Years Foundation Stage Profile (EYFSP) score that was only around a third of a point higher than those whose nurseries did not employ a graduate. The total number of points available is 117. Lead author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at Surrey University, said: “Our research finding that having a member of staff qualified to graduate level working in the nursery has only a tiny effect on children's outcomes surprised us, given existing research that finds well-qualified staff have higher quality interactions with children.” However, Save the Children has claimed that children without an early years teacher are almost 10 per cent less likely to meet the expected levels of development when they start school compared to children who do have a teacher. This comes from its ‘Untapped Potential’ report last November.


Manchester Evening News
What do Ofsted know about three-year-olds? Parents at this ‘inadequate' nursery say it's nonsense

A university study says that inspectors are failing to spot the best and worst nursery schools by using 'traditional methods'

Parents have defended a pre-school rated ‘inadequate’ by Ofsted as a report shows the watchdog’s inspections don’t always reveal the best nurseries. The report published this week shows that sending children to an ‘outstanding’ nursery makes barely any difference to how well they develop in their early years. Researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Sussex and University College London, discovered that traditional measures used to evaluate nursery schools by inspectors failed to spot the best or worst schools.


Day Nurseries
'Outstanding' nurseries have 'tiny effect' on children's attainment

The report titled 'Nursery Quality: New evidence of the impact on children’s outcomes', found that staff qualifications and Ofsted ratings cannot predict the quality of early years education, arguing that conventional methods of testing quality do not have a significant influence on educational outcomes. Co-author Dr Jo Blanden, senior lecturer in Economics at the University of Surrey, said: "Successive governments have focused on improving staff qualifications, based on the belief that these are important for children’s learning.


Phys.Org
New evidence of the impact of quality nurseries on children's outcomes

A report published today reveals that a child's educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only very slightly higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or early years professional. Attending a nursery rated as 'outstanding' by Ofsted, the regulator of educational quality in England, also has limited benefits. The study, conducted by researchers at the Centre for Economic Performance (CEP) at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, matches data on children's outcomes at the end of reception with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for 1.6 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006.

 


BBC News - Education
Graduate nursery staff have 'little effect' on children

Having a graduate teacher in a nursery has only a limited impact on children's attainment, new research suggests.

In England the government wants more graduate staff in nurseries in a bid to boost children's literacy and numeracy. But a study published by the London School of Economics (LSE) claims highly qualified staff had only a "tiny" effect on attainment. One early years group said the the report challenged "many of the assumptions" around current policy. The researchers, from the Centre for Economic Performance at LSE, Surrey University and University College London, looked at figures, drawn from the National Pupil Database, on about 1.8 million five-year-olds who started school in England between 2008 and 2011.


The Daily Telegraph (Print edition)
Pulling rank Top nurseries fail to raise prospects

Sending children to a nursery school rated “outstanding” by Ofsted makes barely any difference to how well they develop, researchers at the London School of Economics, University of Surrey and University College London discovered.

[Link unavailable.]


BT.com
Nursery staff qualifications have little effect on pupils' achievement – study

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, Surrey University and University College London, compared data on children's results with information on nurseries attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million youngsters born in England between September 2003 and August 2006. The findings showed that children who attended a nursery that employed a graduate have a teacher assessment score around a third of a point higher, where the total number of points available was 117.


Nursery World
Graduate settings have little impact on children's outcomes

New research finds that attending an outstanding nursery, or one with graduate staff, has a limited benefit to children's educational attainment.

The study of 1.8 million children born between September 2003 and August 2006, reveals that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their reception year is only ‘slightly’ higher if he or she has been taught in nursery by a qualified teacher or Early Years Professional (EYP).

It also found that attending a nursery rated outstanding by Ofsted had limited benefits.


TES
Qualified nursery teachers make little difference to attainment, study finds

Children with graduate nursery teachers achieve only slightly more by the end of Reception than children with unqualified teachers

Children who have access to a qualified teacher at nursery school do only slightly better at age 5 than those who do not, research suggests.

A new study concludes that a child’s educational achievement at the end of their Reception year is only very slightly higher if they have been taught in a nursery with a teacher trained to graduate level.

There was also little difference between those attending a nursery rated "outstanding" by Ofsted and others.

Researchers from the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics, the University of Surrey and University College London, compared data on children's results with information about the nurseries they attended in the year before starting school for around 1.8 million people born in England between September 2003 and August 2006.


BBC Radio 4
The Today Programme

Dr Hilary Steedman discusses IFS report criticising huge investment into apprenticeships.

0725
Is the way in which the Government will fund new apprenticeships a monumental waste of money? Dr Hilary Steedman is a senior research fellow at LSE specialising in apprenticeships.

 


Personnel Today
Apprenticeship levy and targets risk being poor value for money

Dr Hilary Steedman, senior research fellow at The London School of Economics, speaking on the BBC’s Today programme, said: “I think the IFS has really overstated their case here. We have a really serious skills problem in this country and we need to raise skills through apprenticeships in order to promote economic growth and improve our productivity levels, which are dire compared to Europe.”


20 Minutos blog
Perder el empleo baja la nota media de los hijos

La inestabilidad de los contratos y el desempleo de los padres tienen efectos negativos en el rendimiento educativo de sus hijos. Es una de las principales conclusiones de un estudio elaborado por la investigadra catalana Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, del Centre for Economic Performance, de la London School of Economics.

Read pdf of the article here


Gainsborough Standard
Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

However another study from the London School of Economics suggests a ban on phones has the effect of an extra week of classes over a pupil’s school year.

 

Also in:

Retford Today

Should schools ban mobile phones in class?

 


BBC Radio Leeds
Snippet...

A recent study found a ban on phones generally helps classroom performance research by the London school of economics found that after schools outlawed mobiles test scores of pupils aged 16 improved by 6.4 %.