CEE in the News 2018


Economia
Londres acull un debat impossible a Madrid o Barcelona/London welcomes an impossible debate in Madrid or Barcelona

Scene of the meeting, the London School of Economics, in the center of the British capital, in the third session of a cycle of debates centered on the relationship between Catalonia and Spain. In London, not in Barcelona or in Madrid, as if sitting in the same table, the economics consultant Andreu Mas-Colell and prominent economists, colleagues Jordi Galí, Ángel de la Fuente, Ramon Marimon and Antonio Cabrales in one of the Two cities of the State were impossible. Almost a metaphor for the lack of dialogue not between the five academics present at the event, but between the leading Spanish class and the one that led the Process in Catalonia.


El Pais
Direct: The economic dimension of the Catalan crisis

The London School of Economics hosts a new debate of the series that is celebrating, in collaboration with Politikon, about the future of Spain and Catalonia. On this occasion, with the moderation of Jenifer Ruiz-Valenzuela, of the LSE, Antonio Cabrales, Ángel de la Fuente, Jordi Galí, Ramon Marimon and Andreu Mas-Colell talk about the economic dimension of the Catalan crisis.


The Times
Phone home

Other studies have come to similar conclusions. In 2015 researchers at the London School of Economics studied results at 91 secondary schools in London, Birmingham, Manchester and Leicester that banned mobile phones. They found a rise in results in schools where the ban was tightly enforced, but none where it was flouted.


Centre for Cities – blog
Aberdeen’s economic slowdown highlights the dangers of being a one-sector city

Moreover, when we consider these findings in light of research published last July by Centre for Cities and the Centre for Economic Performance, which suggested that Aberdeen’s economy would be hit harder than that of any other city by either a ‘hard’ or ‘soft’ Brexit, it all adds up to a worrying picture for Aberdeen.


The Times
Children of positive mothers get better GCSE grades

Findings suggest that a mother’s personality has a big impact on the academic performance of teenagers, regardless of other factors. Academics assessed women’s “internal locus of control”, how much they believed that they controlled their own lives rather than having good or bad luck. Babies born to mothers with a strong belief in their own power did better in GCSEs, even when the family background, mother’s education and her IQ and the locus of control of the child were taken into account. The findings by the Centre for Economic Performance, at the London School of Economics, are published in The Economic Journal. The study analysed data from the Children of the 90s project, which tracks the lives of more than 10,000 people born in Bristol.

Related publications

Locus of Control and its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill Formation (pages 298-329)

The Economic Journal Volume 128, Issue 608, February 2018

Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, Francesca Cornaglia

DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12414

 


Guardian
Research every teacher should know: self-control and learning

With technology such as mobile phones in some classrooms increasing distractions, the ability to improve self-control and delayed gratification has become a particularly important skill. Perhaps it’s not surprising that recent research by the London School of Economics found that banning mobiles phones in schools can help improve students’ test scores.


The Economic Journal, Volume 128, Issue 608, February 2018
Locus of Control and its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill Formation (pages 298-329)

Related publications

Locus of Control and its Intergenerational Implications for Early Childhood Skill Formation (pages 298-329)

The Economic Journal Volume 128, Issue 608, February 2018

Warn N. Lekfuangfu, Nattavudh Powdthavee, Nele Warrinnier, Francesca Cornaglia

DOI: 10.1111/ecoj.12414


Irish Daily Mail
Teachers: get phones out of our schools

Snippet: ... to answer Facebook calls, to answer Facebook messages.' She added that the gadgets are having a negative impact on the children's ability to concentrate in class, a key finding of recent research published by the London School of Economics. 'They're not even …


Macleans (Canada)
Editorial: MPs should put down their phones and get back to governing

 

A recent British study by the Centre for Economic Performance compared student results across schools based on cellphone-use policies and concluded, "Schools that restrict access to mobile phones subsequently experience an improvement in text scores."


Kaplan Herald (USA)
Rockland: cellphones at school? The principles differ

Students scored almost seven percent higher following strict phone bans at school, according to a 2015 study published by the Center for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics.


Financial Times
More grammar schools and lower tuition fees are not the answer – the reshuffle at education could mean taking another wrong turn on social mobility

The first criticism of Ms Greening was that she was insufficiently radical in pursuing structural reform — more academies, free schools and grammar schools. Research by the LSE, the Education Policy Institute (EPI) and others has demonstrated that the early academies set up in the Blair era were notably successful in raising attainment in some of the most challenging and disadvantaged schools in the country. But analysis of recent reforms tends to support the cautious Greening approach. LSE research finds little or no significant attainment effects from the more recent academies programme, while an EPI study indicates that claims about the impacts of the free schools programme are exaggerated.


European Union News
New education secretary must focus on improving quality of early childhood education

Guildford: University of Surrey, of United Kingdom has issued the following news release: Researchers from the University of Surrey, Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Sandra McNally, and University College London, Dr Kirstine Hansen, have completed a comprehensive five-year study on ECEC, funded by the Nuffield Foundation. Using administrative data on all children in preschools and the first years of schooling they found that the policy, introduced by the Labour government in 1998, has had little impact on the educational outcomes of children who have participated


European Union News
New education secretary must focus on improving quality of early childhood education

Guildford: University of Surrey, of United Kingdom has issued the following news release: Researchers from the University of Surrey, Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Sandra McNally, and University College London, Dr Kirstine Hansen, have completed a comprehensive five-year study on ECEC, funded by the Nuffield Foundation. Using administrative data on all children in preschools and the first years of schooling they found that the policy, introduced by the Labour government in 1998, has had little impact on the educational outcomes of children who have participated.


The Times
Letter to the Editors - Suggestions for the new education secretary

A 2016 analysis by Stephen Machin and his colleagues at the London School of Economics found that the new phonics mandates were associated with only modest improvements in reading scores by the age of 5, and that those gains disappeared entirely by age 11. If Damian Hinds really wants to make a difference in schools he should instead invest money into the one activity that has been consistently proven to boost reading achievement: putting more books into the school library.

http://cep.lse.ac.uk/textonly/_NEW2014/news/Times11Jan2018_Letter.pdf


Nuffield Foundation
Early childhood education has had little impact on outcomes since the inception of the free entitlement and politicians must now focus efforts on quality

Authors of a comprehensive study on Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) funded by the Nuffield Foundation have called on the Secretary of State for Education to focus on improving the quality of the free entitlement to part time nursery care for 3-year-olds.

Researchers from the University of Surrey, Dr Jo Blanden and Professor Sandra McNally, and University College London, Dr Kirstine Hansen, have completed a comprehensive five-year study on ECEC, funded by the Nuffield Foundation. Using administrative data on all children in preschools and the first years of schooling they found that the policy, introduced by the Labour government in 1998, has had little impact on the educational outcomes of children who have participated.


BBC Radio Kent
(1/11/2018 6:50:11 AM)

Snippet... there has been a study by the London School of Economics which found where mobiles were banned test scores improved. Richard Murphy, one of the authors, is interviewed o...