London School of Economics Centre for the Economics of Education LSE
Centre for the Economics of Education  (CEE)

CEE in the News 2019


LSE Business Review
Millennials are some of the worst hit by social mobility decline in the UK

Young people are now less likely to 'do better' than their parents. Lower wage growth is a key factor, write Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman.

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

The Guardian
Poorer children ''twice as likely to be out of work in later life''

Disadvantaged children who qualify for free school meals are twice as likely to be out of work in later life than their better-off peers, and even when they get good qualifications at school the employment gap remains, according to research.[...]

Dr Stefan Speckesser from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, which conducted the analysis, said the study showed that some local areas were more successfully tackling the negative effects of disadvantage, which are unrelated to education success, on young people’s school-to-work transitions. “From this point of view, the analysis of large data offers a great potential to see where local actors can achieve better outcomes and to learn from good practice,” he said.


The Times
Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long

by Heidi Allen MP, interim leader of Change UK

"I’ve had early sight of research released today that magnifies how the most disadvantaged young people in our country are held back because of recurring factors including where they were born and their parents’ income. The charity Impetus has had sight of years’ worth of Department for Education data which shows there is a lingering “opportunity gap” between children growing up on free school meals and their better-off peers.

Its analysis shows that young people who are eligible for free school meals in year 11 are twice as likely to end up out of work, full-time education or training than their wealthier peers. What’s more, there is an “employment gap” between the most disadvantaged and those who are not, at every qualification level right up to A level."

 


Finance.co.uk
GENERATION GAP: Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Phys.org
Parental influence on educational attainment much greater than previously thought, new research finds

Dr. Federico Rossi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Warwick University and Dr. Marta De Philippis of the Bank of Italy's Department of Economics and Statistics investigated the school performance of second-generation immigrants - children born and schooled in their parents' adopted country - taking account of known influences such as parental income, education level and occupational status.

GENERATION GAP
Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Daily Mail
Young people are doing WORSE than their parents: Just a THIRD of 30-year-olds are earning more than their dads

Jo Blanden, co-author of the study, said: 'Research and political debate have focused on relative social mobility - that is, whether those with higher incomes are likely to have children who are also relatively well-off'.

Toronto Star Online
Schools struggle with phone bans: ‘These devices continue to cause major problems’

A widely cited 2015 paper from the London School of Economics and Political Science found "student performance in high stake exams significantly increases" if mobile phones are banned.

DIAL podcast
Jo Blanden: How well are youngsters getting on compared with mum and dad?

In Episode 4 of the DIAL Podcast, Dr Jo Blanden from the University of Surrey talks about her research using the British Household Panel Survey and Understanding Society to look at home ownership and earnings for younger people and how the picture compares with that of their parents.

The HuffPost Canada
Cell Phones In Classrooms Are So Distracting, U.S. Teacher Shows In Viral Experiment

Bans on mobile phones significantly increases student performance in high-stakes exams, according to a 2015 London School of Economics and Political Science paper.

London Free Press
TVDSB welcomes proposed cellphone ban in Ontario classrooms

...which are designed to create positive learning environments." They note that many school boards have policies that allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom for educational purposes. A 2015 London School of Economics and Political Sciences...

Vice
Doug Ford is Banning Cell Phones in Schools

The Toronto District School Board dropped its ban in 2011, and last summer, it also lifted its ban on Snapchat, Instagram and Netflix. A 2015 London School of Economics study found that ...


The Times
Ban mobile phone use in schools

Almost all schools are thought to have some controls over mobile phone use. Some ban them outright and others restrict their use in lessons or during playtime. A 2015 study by the London School of Economics found that banning them resulted in test scores rising by more than 6 per cent.

Irish Daily Mail
Studies show range of detrimental effects

Snippet: ... A new ESRI study shows smartphone ownership among children has a detrimental impact on their education. And a 2015 study by the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that after sch...

The Conversation
Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat ''public paranoia'' over immigration

Research by London School of Economics professor Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy at The University of Texas at Austin revealed that by paying higher fees, international students in effect subsidise certain domestic students.