CEE in the News 2019


The Independent
Just believing you are trapped by a lack of opportunity can impact economic growth

If, as Aiyar and Ebeke argue, low intergenerational mobility is a good proxy for inequality of opportunity, then its steep decline in Britain has alarming implications for the economy. According to researchers at the University of Surrey and the London School of Economics, in 2005, 62 per cent of people aged between 28 and 32 earned as much or more than their fathers did at the same age. But by 2018, that share had fallen to 36 per cent.
Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

telegraph.co.uk
The £160,000 reason why your children will vote Labour in the general election

Millennials, many of whom came of age during the 2008 financial crisis, are the first generation ever to be less well-off than their parents. The reasons for this, according to a report released last week by the Institute for Fiscal Studies (IFS), are not down to excessive splurging on avocado toast and Netflix subscriptions. Rather, it's the result of fundamental changes to our economy - such as stalling earnings growth, paltry returns on savings and rises in house prices that have pushed property ownership beyond the reach of most young workers.
Research by the Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that the number of young people (those around the age of 30) who earn in real terms as much as or more than their fathers did at the same age plunged from more than a half in 2005 to just 30pc by 2018.
'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

Fort Frances Times Online
Cellphone ban in classrooms goes into effect

The Toronto District School Board used to have a cellphone ban, but reversed it after four years to let teachers dictate what works best for their classrooms.
A 2015 London School of Economics and Political Science paper found that "student performance in high-stakes exams significantly increases" with a ban on mobile phones.


The Times (London)
Young ''worse off than their parents were''

A decade of wage stagnation since the financial crisis has left young people financially worse off than their parents were at the same age, according to a report.
The Centre for Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that the fraction of young people who earn, in real terms, as much as or more than their fathers at the same age, fell by more than 20 percentage points in the decade since 2008-09. In 2005, more than half of young adults aged around 30 earned as much as or more than their fathers. By 2018, the figure had fallen to 30 per cent.
"In other words, the majority of young adults face economic decline on this measure, rather than progress," the report said.
[paywall]
'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

The Sunday Telegraph
Red alert for unions as Corbyn and Labour bid to reverse tide of decline; With the dogfight between pilots and airlines called off, overall disputes are the lowest on record amid a long-term fall in union members

Prof Stephen Machin, at the London School of Economics, says on the decline in membership: "It is not because of getting rid of unions where they are already in place, it is actually the failure to organise new workplaces".

The Telegraph
How the trade unions’ Labour stranglehold is belying their increasing irrelevance in the workplace

Prof Stephen Machin at the London School of Economics says on the decline in membership: "It is not because of getting rid of unions where they are already in place, it is actually the failure to organise new workplaces. It is the unions not being organised in the kind of new workplaces that have come about. They are in declining sectors."
Despite their waning influence in the labour market, the battle lines between unions and business remain largely unchanged.

EALE
Young Labour Economist Prize Winner 2019

2019 winner:
Sara Signorelli (Paris School of Economics)
Do skilled migrants compete with native workers? Analysis of a selective immigration policy

Die Welt
The dream of a better life for children is in danger; Not even half of the 30-year-old British reach the salary level of their parents. The phenomenon is less pronounced in Germany

Just 41 percent of all 30-year-olds earned more in 2017 than their parents did when they were the same age. Two decades earlier, the proportion had been two-thirds higher: in 1995, 69 percent of the age group were better off than the parent generation. This is confirmed by a recent study by the three economists Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahmana from the London School of Economics and the University of Surrey.

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

Forbes Online
The Mobile Phone Ban In French Schools, One Year On. Would It Work Elsewhere?

Supporters of the ban cite research undertaken by the London School of Economics which shows that limited phone use in schools directly correlates to exam success, partly because of an increase in concentration. The same study also reported that "restricting mobile phone use can be a low-cost policy to reduce educational inequalities," another key benefit for many schools. Advocates also believe that reduced screen time reduces the (sometimes negative) impact of social media which can lead to bullying. It also helps to reduce phone theft, which can be an issue in some schools.

i-Independent (Print)
How phonics took over for teaching children to read in primary schools

Last year research by academics at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found that phonics improved children's reading. Sandra McNally, one of the authors, notes that, whereas the boost faded with time for better-off children, who would have eventually learned to read well anyway, it persisted for poor readers and those without English as a first language.

Changing How Literacy Is Taught: Evidence on Synthetic Phonics, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo. AMERICAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL: ECONOMIC POLICY VOL. 10, NO. 2, MAY 2018, (pp. 217-41).

The Economist
How phonics took over English schools

Last year research by academics at the LSE's Centre for Economic Performance found that phonics improved children's reading. Sandra McNally, one of the authors, notes that, whereas the boost faded with time for better-off children, who would have eventually learned to read well anyway, it persisted for poor readers and those without English as a first language. "Other approaches rely on existing child vocabulary and life experiences," says Lydia Cuddy-Gibbs, head of early years at Ark, a charity which runs 38 state schools. "Phonics helps to put children on a level playing field."

Changing How Literacy Is Taught: Evidence on Synthetic Phonicss, Stephen Machin, Sandra McNally, Martina Viarengo. AMERICAN ECONOMIC JOURNAL: ECONOMIC POLICY VOL. 10, NO. 2, MAY 2018, (pp. 217-41).

Forbes
How Beneficial Could Apprenticeships Be In The Future Of Work?

A recent study set out to explore how effective apprenticeships were at supporting students as they both learn new skills and make their way into the workplace. The researchers assess young people who completed their GCSE exams between 2003 and 2008. Nineteen percent of this cohort then went on to do an apprenticeship, with nearly all of them educated up to a maximum of either GCSE level (level 2) or A-level (level 3). The apprenticeships were either therefore intermediate (level 2) or advanced (level 3), therefore no higher or degree apprenticeships were analyzed.

What works centre for local economic growth (blog)
Make the most of devolution: a lesson from the apprenticeships grant

Dr Chiara Cavaglia
Make Devolution is also affecting "education and skills", e.g. with the Adult Education Budget being managed locally form 2019/20. With this in mind, the All Party Parliamentary Group on Apprenticeships (@ApprenticeAPPG) organised a special session to discuss devolution, where we were invited to present findings from our recent study on the devolution of the Apprenticeship Grant for Employers (AGE). the most of devolution: a lesson from the apprenticeships grant.

BBC Radio 4 (7/8/2019 8:36:47 PM)
BBC Radio 4 PM

Snippet: ...'s virtually impossible However good the advice they get is are trying to understand the make your way through that is extremely hard and Professor Sandra McNally runs the centre for vocational education research at the London school of economics agrees that the comp...

LSE IN PARLIAMENT
Lord Layard contributes to Lords debate on Apprenticeships and refers to LSE research findings on the economics of T-levels

According to LSE research (from the Centre for Vocational Educational Research) apprentices are earning 20% more than the people who take the full-time college route, Lord Layard said in his contribution to the debate around apprenticeships, their value and the apprenticeship levy.

Mind Matters
The Smartest Phone Is Silent in Class

In a 2015 Centre for Economic Performance study in Britain, researchers found that a school smartphone ban improved the academic performance of students in the bottom quarter of the test group significantly (14%) in high stakes exams.

Prospect Magazine
Five reasons inequality is among the most pressing issues of our times

What about in the UK? Stephen Machin, Jo Blanden and friends pointed out that those born in the 1950s were more socially mobile than those born in the 1970s, who entered the labour market at the UK's peak of inequality. It seems obvious when you write it down, but new research has shown that the more there is at stake-like in highly unequal societies-then the more parents try to help their children get on in life, and it is so much easier for rich parents to provide that help than it is for those with few resources.

Social Mobility And Its Enemies Lee Elliot Major & Stephen Machin, Pelican, October 2018.

'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

The Independent
Could a smartphone ban in schools curb cyberbullying?

A 2015 study by the London School of Economics found that banning phones could give low-achieving and low-income pupils an additional hour a week in school.

The Daily Telegraph
Cambridge applicants fail to make the grades

The statistics reflect research warnings that the majority of A-level grades predicted by teachers are incorrect. A 2016 report by Dr Gill Wyness of the UCL Institute of Education found that one in six A-level grade predictions was accurate, with three quarters of actual grades turning out lower than estimated and only one in 10 higher. Data from Oxford and Cambridge showed that both universities have marginally increased numbers of black and ethnic minority students amid increasing pressure to broaden access.

LSE Business Review blog
Apprenticeships bring returns for young people with low-medium qualifications

However, pay varies among different sectors, which contributes to an earnings gap between men and women, write Chiara Cavaglia, Sandra McNally and Guglielmo Ventura.

LBC
LBC (5/19/2019 7:27:22 AM)

Snippet: ...have they can bring them into school was on was switched off and kept in lockers or somewhere safe and there's also an academic research Katie you're aware of which is linked to banning phones to better GCSE results the London School of Economics found that in 91 sch...

BBC News Channel
BBC News

Snippet: ...school? According to this group of head teachers yes, they should be. The reason they make this argument is they think mobile phones are a complete distraction in school, and there has been evidence from a study done by LSE which says if you ta...

BBC Wales Television
Breakfast

Snippet: ...school? According to this group of head teachers yes, they should be. The reason they make this argument is they think mobile phones are a complete distraction in school, and there has been evidence from a study done by LSE which says if you ta...

The Daily Telegraph
School mobile phone ban will help pupils focus

Snippet: ...nd the head teacher who bans mobile phones", adding: "Children in school should not be being distracted by their phones." Banning phones in schools delivers an average 6 per cent increase in test scores, according to an LSE study cited by Onwar...

LSE Business Review
Millennials are some of the worst hit by social mobility decline in the UK

Young people are now less likely to 'do better' than their parents. Lower wage growth is a key factor, write Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman.

This blog post is based on 'Falling Absolute Intergenerational Mobility' presented at the Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2019.

The Guardian
Poorer children ''twice as likely to be out of work in later life''

Disadvantaged children who qualify for free school meals are twice as likely to be out of work in later life than their better-off peers, and even when they get good qualifications at school the employment gap remains, according to research.[...]

Dr Stefan Speckesser from the National Institute of Economic and Social Research, which conducted the analysis, said the study showed that some local areas were more successfully tackling the negative effects of disadvantage, which are unrelated to education success, on young people’s school-to-work transitions. “From this point of view, the analysis of large data offers a great potential to see where local actors can achieve better outcomes and to learn from good practice,” he said.


The Times
Change UK offers a clean sheet to tackle injustices that have plagued our society for too long

by Heidi Allen MP, interim leader of Change UK

"I’ve had early sight of research released today that magnifies how the most disadvantaged young people in our country are held back because of recurring factors including where they were born and their parents’ income. The charity Impetus has had sight of years’ worth of Department for Education data which shows there is a lingering “opportunity gap” between children growing up on free school meals and their better-off peers.

Its analysis shows that young people who are eligible for free school meals in year 11 are twice as likely to end up out of work, full-time education or training than their wealthier peers. What’s more, there is an “employment gap” between the most disadvantaged and those who are not, at every qualification level right up to A level."

 


Finance.co.uk
GENERATION GAP: Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Phys.org
Parental influence on educational attainment much greater than previously thought, new research finds

Dr. Federico Rossi, Assistant Professor in the Department of Economics at Warwick University and Dr. Marta De Philippis of the Bank of Italy's Department of Economics and Statistics investigated the school performance of second-generation immigrants - children born and schooled in their parents' adopted country - taking account of known influences such as parental income, education level and occupational status.

GENERATION GAP
Evidence that young Brits are now less likely to ‘do better’ than their parents

Doing better financially than your parents is an important marker of success, and for much of the last half century, real earnings growth in the UK was strong enough that most young people achieved this milestone. But new research by Jo Blanden, Stephen Machin and Sumaiya Rahman shows that plummeting earnings since the Great Recession has meant that fewer young adults now are earning more than their fathers.

Daily Mail
Young people are doing WORSE than their parents: Just a THIRD of 30-year-olds are earning more than their dads

Jo Blanden, co-author of the study, said: 'Research and political debate have focused on relative social mobility - that is, whether those with higher incomes are likely to have children who are also relatively well-off'.

Toronto Star Online
Schools struggle with phone bans: ‘These devices continue to cause major problems’

A widely cited 2015 paper from the London School of Economics and Political Science found "student performance in high stake exams significantly increases" if mobile phones are banned.

DIAL podcast
Jo Blanden: How well are youngsters getting on compared with mum and dad?

In Episode 4 of the DIAL Podcast, Dr Jo Blanden from the University of Surrey talks about her research using the British Household Panel Survey and Understanding Society to look at home ownership and earnings for younger people and how the picture compares with that of their parents.

The HuffPost Canada
Cell Phones In Classrooms Are So Distracting, U.S. Teacher Shows In Viral Experiment

Bans on mobile phones significantly increases student performance in high-stakes exams, according to a 2015 London School of Economics and Political Science paper.

London Free Press
TVDSB welcomes proposed cellphone ban in Ontario classrooms

...which are designed to create positive learning environments." They note that many school boards have policies that allow students to bring their own devices into the classroom for educational purposes. A 2015 London School of Economics and Political Sciences...

Vice
Doug Ford is Banning Cell Phones in Schools

The Toronto District School Board dropped its ban in 2011, and last summer, it also lifted its ban on Snapchat, Instagram and Netflix. A 2015 London School of Economics study found that ...

Sky News (2/10/2019 8:39:03 PM) Broadcast
Mention of LSE study re banning mobile phones in schools


The Times
Ban mobile phone use in schools

Almost all schools are thought to have some controls over mobile phone use. Some ban them outright and others restrict their use in lessons or during playtime. A 2015 study by the London School of Economics found that banning them resulted in test scores rising by more than 6 per cent.

Irish Daily Mail
Studies show range of detrimental effects

Snippet: ... A new ESRI study shows smartphone ownership among children has a detrimental impact on their education. And a 2015 study by the Centre of Economic Performance at the London School of Economics found that after sch...

The Conversation
Brexit, xenophobia and international students: how to combat ''public paranoia'' over immigration

Research by London School of Economics professor Stephen Machin and Richard Murphy at The University of Texas at Austin revealed that by paying higher fees, international students in effect subsidise certain domestic students.